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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my does sire, grandsire, and great grandsire have been polled. My doe herself is not polled but I'm wondering if she can still throw a polled kid because of her families past.. The buck I'm using isn't polled so I'm sure that decreases the odds but still?

Also is it only if you breed a polled to a polled that you can possibly end up with a hermie? There's no other sort of polled mix breeding that would bring that out? Kinda just curious. :p
 

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No, the polled gene is dominant. In order for her to throw polled kids she'd have to be polled herself or be bred to a homozygous polled goat to insure polled kids. For instance, let's use "P" as polled and "p" as horned, the genetics would be as followed:
PpxPp would mean that both sire and dam are polled and could throw 50% polled kids and 50% horned. Now, if you have a breeding of Ppxpp you would have a 25% chance of polled kids and a 75% chance of horned kids. You can also have a homozygous goat which would be represented as PP and all of their offspring would be polled no matter what they were bred to. There is no way to tell if a goat is homozygous for the polled gene just by looking at it, though. Hope that helps!
 

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And there is no proof that polled to polled throws hermies more often. They occur just as often from horned breedings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Huh very interesting and cleared things up for me! Thanks, I had been wondering about polled genes and how they work. I know they're a little different than blue eyes.
 

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I had a hermie born to 2 horned animals who were in no way related. (2 completely different breeds with entirely different backrounds).
 

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I have one polled doe who's dam is polled and sire horned, when bred with a horned buck she never produced polled kids. She was bred with my polled buck whos sire was polled and dam horned and together they produced polled triplets.
The same polled buck was bred with a horned doe and produced quads...2 polled and 2 horned kids.
The trait has to be "seen" or dominant in order to be passed onto kids....same concept as blue eyes, if one parent has blue eyes, kids can also have blue eyes... not a possibility if it's not seen :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have one polled doe who's dam is polled and sire horned, when bred with a horned buck she never produced polled kids. She was bred with my polled buck whos sire was polled and dam horned and together they produced polled triplets.
The same polled buck was bred with a horned doe and produced quads...2 polled and 2 horned kids.
The trait has to be "seen" or dominant in order to be passed onto kids....same concept as blue eyes, if one parent has blue eyes, kids can also have blue eyes... not a possibility if it's not seen :)
That does make a lot of sense. Thanks for the example :)
 

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Ditto information above. Polled can't skip a generation, although I have seen plenty of false advertisements to the contrary. There is a Yahoo group about polled genetics that I belong to. Some good info on there, as well as records of intersexes being born to polled-polled breeding. I have read their data and I believe that the truth is that intersex does happen a little more often with polled-polled but not such a high incidence as to discourage any and all polled-polled breeding. Another possible outcome is homozygous for polled meaning that polled animal can only have polled babies (I would love one of those!)
 
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