Polled X Polled

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by DebMc, Sep 26, 2010.

  1. DebMc

    DebMc Member

    845
    Dec 10, 2009
    Will breeding polled to polled produce all polled offspring? :whatgoat: If not, what is the estimated percentage? Anyone know? Or is it pretty much luck of the draw?

    Deb Mc
     
  2. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    Jess (myfainters) had a good chart on this. Let me see if I cant find where she posted it

    the discussion was on polledXpolled offspring being hermaphrodites or not


     

  3. milkmaid

    milkmaid I'm not addicted - I'm in love!

  4. DebMc

    DebMc Member

    845
    Dec 10, 2009
    Thanks for the info, Stacy. Hermaphrodites - forgot about that risk, however small.

    Milkmaid - I have two polled and MGR-registered doelings, Mini Silky X Fainters. I've been thinking about breeding them but don't want to mess w/disbudding kids. I used to have a couple polled Navajo Angora does. Both kidded, had nice utters, so neither of those was a hermaphrodite either.

    1 in 8 from a polled to polled isn't that great of a risk. But then if something bad is 'gonna happen, it always happens to me. So I think I'll play it safe and pass.

    Deb Mc
     
  5. milkmaid

    milkmaid I'm not addicted - I'm in love!

    Neat! I don't like disbudding at all, one reason I was thinking polled might be better...also, I had heard somewhere that polled goats tend to give more milk. Don't know how true that is though.
     
  6. myfainters

    myfainters New Member

    Oct 29, 2009
    Lancaster, CA
    Deb, I've been breeding polled X polled for years..... Mitsy and Angel are out of a Polled X Polled breeding. Usually I get a 50/50 polled to horned ratio though regardless of Polled X Polled or Horned X Polled. :)

    If you want to breed the girls let me know..... I've got lots of boys to choose from! LOL
     
  7. DebMc

    DebMc Member

    845
    Dec 10, 2009
    I don't think I could debud the horned kids. Do you do it yourself?

    Know of any suitable boys here in AZ? Preferably a Mini Silky.

    Deb Mc
     
  8. PznIvyFarm

    PznIvyFarm New Member

    939
    Jul 25, 2010
    Deb, I didn't think i could disbud my kids either. I had 7 kids though, and i knew they needed it (and didn't want to pay the vet $18 per kid) Yahoo's (the daddy) owner came and showed me how, said she had been shown how by an aunt who had goats for 40 years. It was not as horrible as i thought. I had spent all this time building a disbudding box, and we ended up holding them on our laps. I tuned out the babies, and just did it. She did the first three, that i had let go a bit longer than i should have, i did the next three, and she did my tiny girl (who probably could have waited another week, but i wanted to get them all done and over with) Everyone is recovering nicely, and they stopped fussing as soon as they were back with mom (just like i had read, but seeing is believing)

    Just fyi, we sat side by side on a bench (she said she usually uses a hay bale, but i only had a half bale left at the time) The person doing the disbudding puts the baby across their lap, facing the side of the person's dominant hand (so my friend, who is lefthanded, sat on my left, and the baby faced left) She put the baby's front legs between her legs, and said depending on the size of the baby, you can either put the rear legs between the legs of the other person, or between the legs of one person and the other (for a short body length) The helper makes sure the baby doesn't go anywhere. The person doing the disbudding uses their dominant hand with the iron, and the other hand holds back the ears and pins the head down on their leg. She said the advantage if they do manage to get loose, or are not securely held for a bit, that you just lift the iron away. I think the babies were a little happier that they were being held, rather than shoved in a box.
     
  9. DebMc

    DebMc Member

    845
    Dec 10, 2009
    Thanks for the descriptive reply, PznIvyFarm. My reservation about disbudding is more physical than emotional. I have a metabolic myopathy and a CT disorder that amongst other things, limit mobility and use of my hands. I had to sell off my Angoras because I could no longer afford to pay to have someone come in and provide needed services (e.g. shearing, hoof care, etc.). The two minis I kept are more affordable to feed and keep. I can trim their hooves myself w/the help of an assistant and they don't need shearing. Not sure I want to breed them; am just looking into what all's involved i.e. cost, care, etc.

    Deb Mc
     
  10. myfainters

    myfainters New Member

    Oct 29, 2009
    Lancaster, CA
    Well, if you decide to breed... you can always breed the girls to my MCH silky buck Triton..... those kids would have a TON of coat. :)
    Disbudding is not difficult.... we use a disbudding box though.... too afraid of them moving and getting an ear or something.

    I don't know of any silkies in AZ (besides a wether and the girls sister! LOL).... there are some NICE fainters in AZ though.
     
  11. PznIvyFarm

    PznIvyFarm New Member

    939
    Jul 25, 2010
    We held the ears back with our hand, so we would be more likely to get burned - also she said if they start struggling too much and you think they might escape, just lift off the dehorner.

    I had more trouble giving cd/t shots today. Three of them started freaking out and my daughter lost her grip, so i had to pull out the needle - fun fun fun. I was so stressed by the end i was shaking. I am definitely getting DH to hold them tomorrow for the wethering -don't want any accidents there!
     
  12. peggy

    peggy Senior Member

    Aug 10, 2010
    B.C. Canada
    I have 3 new girls coming this month. All polled. I'd love to get a polled buck and hope for all polled kids. It is a dreadful job to dehorn those babies. Sounds like it might not be so bad to breed poll to poll.