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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all
I'm a first time goat owner and I have two Nigora does. They are sisters and are just over a year old. Last week I noticed one of them had a suspiciously large udder. She has never kidded, so I got worried. At first a reddish brown liquid came out, so I got antibiotics from our vet. Now (it's been a few days since we gave her the last dosage) actual milk is coming out. I did the at-home mastitis test (dish soap and warm water) and it looks okay, but I don't know how to care for her. Some people say milk her, other say let her dry up. Any ideas?
 

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Something I was not really aware of when we first got our does, who also had a precocious udder, is that it is ESSENTIAL to clean the teats before and after milking... after more than before... that includes just doing treatment and milking out for mastitis.

What type of antiobotics did the vet give you? Was it ToDay or ToMorrow which goes in the udder via infusion?

If you have an agricultural extension office near you, most of them have an animal lab that you can take a sample to.

If it's clear/milky, that's a good sign... firm, but no lumps, is also good. I would take a sample of what you can get to a lab or send it off to make sure the antibiotics worked, clean the teats, and leave her be until you get the results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Something I was not really aware of when we first got our does, who also had a precocious udder, is that it is ESSENTIAL to clean the teats before and after milking... after more than before... that includes just doing treatment and milking out for mastitis.

What type of antiobotics did the vet give you? Was it ToDay or ToMorrow which goes in the udder via infusion?

If you have an agricultural extension office near you, most of them have an animal lab that you can take a sample to.

If it's clear/milky, that's a good sign... firm, but no lumps, is also good. I would take a sample of what you can get to a lab or send it off to make sure the antibiotics worked, clean the teats, and leave her be until you get the results.
I can't remember the name of the antibiotics but it was a sub-q shot. I think it started with an "N"? Are you suggesting just letting her dry up? We plan to breed her this October so if milking her would upset her breeding schedule i don't want to do that.
 

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I can't remember the name of the antibiotics but it was a sub-q shot. I think it started with an "N"? Are you suggesting just letting her dry up? We plan to breed her this October so if milking her would upset her breeding schedule i don't want to do that.
That's interesting... subq antibiotics don't work with mastitis, they can't get where they need to be. Did he do a test to confirm it was mastitis? If so, it would have been a bacterial test positive for staph.

What I recommend if possible is getting a sample of what you are milking out and having it tested for mastitis. Not knowing always increases the risk of you treating with an antibiotic, when you don't really need it, which can increase the chance of resistance in the future.

Assuming its positive for mastitis, and IF there is no swelling/pain/lumps, I would get a container of ToMorrow from a farm store and infuse it in the teat . Watch a youtube video on it ; You have to be careful not to damage the teat when doing this. ToMorrow is a long lasting antibiotic used for precocious udders, or when you are drying a doe up. ToDay is shorter lasting and is best used when you are actively in milk.

For reference, my girl had a precocious udder that my husband "milked" without cleaning, and she got several lumps which we believed to be mastitis. We had it tested, it was positive for staph... we did weeks of massage/essential oils/ ToDay/toMorrow... the ToMorrow seemed to work the best. After weeks of massage and antibiotic therapy, we settled on just infusing ToMorrow and letting it be... she still has the lumps (mastitis scar tissue) but she's our best milker and the infection is gone.

Hope this helps!
 
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