Pregnant doe vomiting cud, then white foam, every 4-5 days

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Granolamom, Jan 14, 2010.

  1. Granolamom

    Granolamom New Member

    20
    Feb 21, 2009
    Aisa is about 2 years old, and was bred to a buck 12 weeks ago (we're fairly sure she's pregnant). She has never had any issues, but suddenly started bloating on Dec.25th in the evening. When we got to her, she was vomiting white foam all over the goat shed. We treated with vegetable oil, then massaged and walked her, and she was better. We took her off grain for a few days (Noble Goat, which I recently switched to from Dumor Goat Pellets, because it was recommended to me for my other goat who has UC issues). She gets free-choice fescue hay, Golden Blend Minerals, Baking Soda, cut brush, and fresh water daily. Since that day, she has bloated every 4 to 5 days, always in the early evening. We've treated her with vegetable oil, milk of magnesia, probiotics.
    She flicks her tongue a lot, and the noises from her abdomen are extremely loud. Her droppings are normal. She does chew cud, but not as often as normal, and she seems to swallow it back down after she brings it up, instead of chewing. What could this be???
     
  2. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    welcome :wave:

    I would check your hay -- is there anything different in it? did you recently get a new batch? If you got if from your feed store did they recently get a new batch?

    The switch of grains could be causing issues -- I would pull her totally off grain and see if that makes a difference. Slowly introduce the grain back to her in small amounts.

    INstead of oil - which does work - try baking soda, mix a little water with it so it forms like a ball and then stuff that into her mouth.
     

  3. Granolamom

    Granolamom New Member

    20
    Feb 21, 2009
    I did get the hay at the feed store, and it did occur to me that it could be the cause of it. I only have 2 goats, though, and the other one is perfectly fine, eating the same hay. Which brings up a question I've had for a while: what kind of hay is best for 2 does, if one of them tends to get urinary calculi? My feed store has orchard alfalfa, bermuda, and fescue. Which do you recommend? Do you think that the medicated feed (which she's never been on before) could be causing her issues? I did switch them very gradually, but could it perhaps be the added medications for UC and Cocci, that are making her sick?
     
  4. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    can you switch her back to the Dumor? I know does can get UC but you dont hear of it often thats interesting that she has had more then one case of it I am gathering.

    YOu want a diet that is a ratio of 2-1 calcium to phosperous to keep UC away. To much phosperous will cause the stones. As well as to much calcium.
     
  5. I am newer with goats, but noticed you wrote you were giving fescue hay.
    I have been told NOT to give my goats fescue hay, also been told that fescue can cause miscarriage.

    Just a thought as I was reading your post, Like I said, I am pretty new with goats.
    Can anyone verify this, please ????
     
  6. Granolamom

    Granolamom New Member

    20
    Feb 21, 2009
    My younger doe's brother had to be put down, because he had a bad case of UC, and we could not afford an operation at the time. He was wethered at a very young age (by the person we bought him from), and I assume that was a contributing factor. His sister started having trouble urinating a few months later, though, and continued to have recurring issues, until we started adding AC to her feed. That seemed to put an end to it (knock on wood).
    I could switch them back to Dumor, but will then have to feed them separately (so that I can still add AC to the younger one's feed).
    I've never heard about not feeding pregnant does fescue hay. Please let me know if there's anything to that. I'm somewhat new to goat ownership, too, and try really hard to do everything right for them, despite all the conflicting information out there.
     
  7. Renegade

    Renegade New Member

    17
    Mar 1, 2008
    Georgia
  8. crocee

    crocee New Member

    Jul 25, 2008
    Northeast Arkansas
    If the Noble Goat pellets contain monensin for cocci, that could be the problem.
     
  9. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    good point


    you might want to consider just getting a bag of Ammonium Chloride from Hoeggers Goat Supply and adding to their loose minerals or top dressing the goats food with it. THis way they get the AC but dont have to have the harmful chemical for the coccida which is not needed.
     
  10. Granolamom

    Granolamom New Member

    20
    Feb 21, 2009
    I had a creepy feeling, that it could be the Noble Goat medicated feed. I was advised by a friend I trust with all my goat questions, that I needed to switch to a medicated feed, because cocci apparently runs rampant here in Georgia. Feeding them this massive amount of chemicals felt totally wrong to me from the start, but I really trust my friend's expertise, and went with it anyway. I'm going to switch them back to the Dumor pellets, which worked great for me in the future, and give AC as a top dressing. We'll see where that takes us. Thank you all!
     
  11. crocee

    crocee New Member

    Jul 25, 2008
    Northeast Arkansas
    The medicated feeds are fine, its just the ones with Monensin that seem to cause problems.
     
  12. ENC

    ENC New Member

    83
    Jan 2, 2010
    NE OK
    I know the purina Noble goat chow I feed had Decoquinate in it, not monensin.

    Evan
     
  13. crocee

    crocee New Member

    Jul 25, 2008
    Northeast Arkansas
    Purina uses both meds.