Pregnant Doe

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by moday, Feb 15, 2010.

  1. moday

    moday Member

    160
    Oct 10, 2007
    Our doe has begun to bag up, so we are finally confident that she is pregnant. Anyhow, the question I have is when I should confine her to prep for the event?

    She could have conceived as early as Oct 4, so that puts an early March delivery possible. The birthing stall is currently filled with hay and straw, so I have some modifications to perform.

    How early can a kid(s) come? I think right now is about 133 days from this past Oct 4th. I think that she probably was bred a couple days into her stay at this farm, but I don't have alot to go on.

    Please advise what would be suggested. We are in Michigan, so it is getting cold still at night (mid 20's farenheit).

    Thanks, moday
     
  2. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    Day 140 is about the earliest kids can be born and survive without complications...but kids are hardly ever born before day 145--even does with multiple kids usually hang on that long.

    I would just keep an eye on her and check her ligaments and tail head every day and keep and eye out for pre-birthing goo.

    The kids should be fine...even with these colder temps. If the doe has not kidded before it is good to try to be there if possible to help get the kids dried off quickly. It might also be a good idea to keep sweaters on the kids for the first couple days or so untill they are a bit stronger and better able to regulate their body temps.
     

  3. Goat Crazy

    Goat Crazy New Member

    616
    Feb 8, 2010
    NE Ohio
    I have a doe due around the same time and we have about the same temperatures. I asked a lady on allexperts when is it to cold for kids. She said if it is below 32 F then it would be to cold and we should bottle feed.
    Has any body else had baby goats when temps. were in the 20s F and do just fine?
     
  4. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    coldest i've had them born outside was 37F. this was last summer. I keep mine in a heated barn at a constant 45F. at a month or so they can stay outside.
     
  5. nancy d

    nancy d Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    near Seattle
    Cold is not the real enemy with new kids. It is drafts & not being in nice dry deep bedding.
    You can help momma doe dry off the kids.
    If I can catch em ready to pop they go to birthing area a day or two before.
     
  6. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    I've had a doe deliver on day 142 with triplets when it was 6*F.....I do not use heat lamps and my girls have nice, draft free kidding stalls. What I do is to be there when the babies arrive, I thoroughly dry them, get them nursing and let mom bond with them...I also use puppy sweaters once they are totally dry, I take the sweaters off of them after the 1st day or 2. Never lost a kid yet to the cold.
     
  7. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    yeah liz and nancy have a great point. draft is whats kills kids for sure.
     
  8. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    Like Liz, I have had kids born in single digits and they were just fine. I don't use heat lamps either. I know breeders in my area that have most of their kiddings in January and February when temps are in the 20's and below everyday. Goat kids are tough creatures and I have found that kids born during the winter are actually more hardy than spring and summer kids.
     
  9. Goat Crazy

    Goat Crazy New Member

    616
    Feb 8, 2010
    NE Ohio
    Great!!! Now I don't have to bottle feed due to cold temps.
     
  10. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    The usual reasons for bottlefeeding are either a sick mom, weak kid or for CAE prevention....I've never heard of bottle feeding because the weather is cold :?

    Besides making sure the kids are dry and fluffy and in a draft free area, it is important to make sure they are nursing, colostrum is VERY important to newborns and they need to nurse within an hour to an hour and a half of birth.
     
  11. Goat Crazy

    Goat Crazy New Member

    616
    Feb 8, 2010
    NE Ohio
    Well, the lady I asked said it would be to cold for them if temps below 32F. So I would have to bring them in the house for day or two then I could keep them in the garage. She bottle feeds all her baby goats so maybe she just didn't know that they could handle cold temps.
     
  12. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Ohhhhhh, I see. LOL, raising goats is like raising kids...theres more than one way to do it.