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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A little back story: It started with the nanny being stand offish from the rest of the herd. She would eat as long as you brought feed to her. So that's what we did. Low grade fever. We had another nanny that just got over a respiratory infection possibly contagious so we gave her a shot of LA 300. Took her to vet the next day after no improvement. She did in fact have the infection. They treated her for it, it's gone.

Now: They tested her keytones when we dropped her off, and they were only slightly elevated. Since then she has stopped eating, even though the infection is gone. She is currently on a catheter (IV drip) to keep her keytones level. They have tried to remove it a few times and when they do her keytones spike. (There is another goat that was dropped off with her who was brought because of her keytone levels, so she wasn't alone. We think she was getting pushed out of the feeding area. The other 24 are fine.) They have been unsuccessful with getting their keytones under control without an IV and we can't continue to leave them down there. We are 15 days out until their due dates. It was recomended that her companion have an abortion to save her life, so that is why we are waiting to pick them up until tomorrow. The goat in question, Storm, keytone level hasn't spiked as high as her companion. She is carrying tripplets though but she still has really good condition... for now.

We are bringing her home tomorrow. We have glucote and propylene glycol and we will be drenching her. I said two, but husband says 3x's a day. Can you drench them too much? My main question is what can we do to make her eat? She might start eating as soon as she gets home or the drenching might bring her appetite back but I want to be prepared if those things alone do not work.
 

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Oh I am swearing by that dyne after this last doe. The doe I had wasn’t down and totally off feed but she was not eating even half of what she should have been and I was having to help her get up. I decided to try the dyne and I saw a huge improvement after the first day. She was able to get up and down with ease and then back 100% the day after that. Although I kept going with it for a few more days to play it safe.
I mixed the magic and took out what I needed for that day and added 60cc of the dyne to it.
Be careful with the propylene glycol, it can burn the throat and is a appetite suppressant. It is used for does that are already off feed, which she is, but it might mess with her wanting to eat on her own again.
 

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Newbie question......what is dyne?
It a high calorie supplement that has a lot of amino acids and vitamins and dense omega 3 fats. It helps boost energy and gives a lot of bang in a small amount of liquid when you have to drench.
You find it in either the livestock or dog sections of feedstores.
 

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I had a doe who was a ff - pregnant with triplets who tetered on ketosis. Call me crazy, but a breeder recommended giving her creamed corn 3 x a day. The vet gave me propolyne glycol but I hate how it burns and suppresses appetite. This doe loved her creamed corn, delivered at first with a large empty syringe with the end cut off. She started looking forward to her special treat. We did this for 3 weeks and she successfully delivered her triplets by herself with no more issues. I gave her about 1/2 can each time. She would also eat her hay and nibble her grain. It really helped her, and I would try it again if I had another start to have a problem.
 

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I just read in the goat magazine that a way to help prevent ketosis is to top dress feed the last month with brown sugar. The author said they have not has any ketosis (they did before) since they started the brown sugar.

That said, maybe disolve it in water and administer if you don't care for the propylene glycol.

Good luck with the does. I hope they can hang on a few more days to kid successfully. Do you have Dexamethasone on hand to help the kids lung developments in the event they are viable when born?
 

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Have the vet teach you how to tube before leaving with her just in case it comes to that. If you can't get her appetite back, tube alfalfa pellets soaked to mash in warm water. Tube it fairly warm so as not to drop the body temp. You could includes molasses, magic, or creamed corn in this mash for additional calories and sugar energy.

Wishing the best for both does. I'm sorry they had to abort one.
 

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Go with the dog! Kinda stupid but it’s the same exact thing but for dogs it’s much cheaper.
Creamed corn is a good idea too. I tried that on this doe but was not having luck getting it down her with my drench gun, guess I should have talked to goatsblessing about how to give it ;)
I also second asking the vet about tubing. It will be a life saver if it does come to that and it is skill that you might need one day.
 

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I am so sorry about your does. I hope the doe that is terminating pregnancy survives and recovers. Toxemia is just awful, we have dealt with it over the years, and IMO it is probably the leading cause of death in Boer goat does, and generally the culprit is triplets or large twins.
Every time we've had a goat with toxemia that has been the case.

I may write a book, so please bare with me!
When you bring her home, keep her and the other doe together - put out a buffet of food for them! A feeder with their regular feed, if you feed pellets get some sweet feed - might look into a very sweet horse feed - something to get them interested and keep them interested in eating. Alfalfa hay, protein/molasses tub, dry electrolytes (Blue Lite, or the Goat electrolytes from TSC are what we use), offer regular water and a bucket of electrolyte water.

Tube feeding really is best! I learned back in March when our last doe to kid had toxemia and was horrible trying to drench with a drench gun. I was able to tube feed her by myself.
If you are on Facebook this video is excellent!

Recipe ideas...
There are a lot of different recipes out there.

Magic is the one most recommended as stated in posts above.

**A really good drench recipe is Lauren Green's - here's an article with drench recipe and info!
http://abga.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Pregnancy-Toxemia-Lauren-Green.pdf

Scroll down to read about Dexamethasone and inducing. IMO it is a huge life saver for kids especially when you need to induce. We had triplets born 7-8 days early back in March from a toxemia doe, and they survived. As soon as they come out, we give about 1/4cc Dex orally, and 1/4 to 1/2cc SQ if they are weak/struggling. Amazing stuff IMO.

Our last doe that had toxemia I tube fed Land o'Lakes Does Match milk replacer! Directions are:
5oz milk replacer (by weight) to 17oz of warm water 2x a day.

Make sure she is getting probiotics - you might look into jump start probiotics or the Goats prefer brand at TSC.

B-Complex daily.

I've also combined some of the drenches to make my own, but what works for one doe may not work for another. Just remember whatever you do use, if she is not eating well, I was told to add pureed Pumpkin or even pureed sweet potato (can be from a can) to the drench to help give fiber and nutrition.

Offer her pieces of cut up apples, celery, carrots w/tops on them if she likes those. You can also add some blended cream corn to many drenches = corn = carbs = energy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So two does of 24 became ketotic? Would you consider those two under or overweight? Related?

I didn't notice anything that would cause an alarm. Here is a picture I took around Dec 18th give or take a few days. The first picture Ruby who was induced is circled on the left and Storm is on the right. Second and third picture is from a different angle with Storm on the left and Ruby on the right. If you see something I should be looking for, please let me know. Ruby is the one whose keytone levels spiked. Storm is the one who got the infection and didn't stop eating until at the vets where her keytone levels rose, but have been being managed. They do have a protein tube away from their lofting area, and their feed is dressed with molasses and mineral. (Edited to add: The buck was removed two days after I took these pictures)
121_3859_LI.jpg 121_3859_LI.jpg 121_3862 (2)_LI.jpg

Update: Ruby gave birth to quads this morning. One was already dead. As of right now they are trying to keep the three others alive, but they are definitely preemie. Seeing Ruby's babies has put Storm in good spirits. She keeps trying to claim Ruby's kids. They think the change in her demeanor will be enough to get her to eat. Since the vets are working to keep Ruby's kids alive and she'll be there a few more days, Storm will be staying down there with her for now. Thank you for all the info, we will begin getting prepared for her return.
 

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Fingers crossed for Ruby's three kids.

Your herd is very beautiful and I envy them!
About how many pounds of grain are the does getting per day? Is that all the way through pregnancy? Year round?

I would say, if anything, they might be *slightly* overweight but it's nearly impossible to say without getting hands on them. Plus toxemia can come on regardless of being a healthy weight! I'm hoping this is just a fluke year for you of two cases and you never encounter Toxemia again.

Do they get exercise/allowed out to winter pasture areas while pregnant or kept fairly confined?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
@SalteyLove Thank you! I'm unsure about the amount of grain. My husband does the rations. Besides feed they have access to a large brome bale, and are given alfalfa hay every day. They do have access to a large area they can go roam and forage, but since removing the buck they no longer roam very far.

I dropped more feed off at the vet's today. They told me both nannies are eating leaves. I also dropped off some pumpkin puree and Glu-coat since we already had that on hand. I got to see the kids and they are tiny! So precious. It is amazing they are alive. We have been told that their lungs are underdeveloped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Here is a better picture of their lofting area. I just didn't include it because it didn't have both goats. These were taken when the buck was in the pen, but since he has been removed and they aren't foraging as much- the big round brome feeder was added just behind the kid's feeder you see. Their protein tube you can see just through the gate opening in the far back right corner that leads to their foraging area. Their foraging area stretches past their lofting fence to the right quite a bit. Other goats have access to the left.
 

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