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What do you folks carry for protection for you and your goats? It seems like in most posts it's other peoples dogs not wild critters that are the biggest issue.
 

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Dido to what he said. In addition be very alert to how your goats react when startled. If you walk your goat off lead have them rigged up for a quick catch handle. Train the goats to stay in sight and relatively close to you when off lead. This works well for me and even though I have 2 hands and 3 goats I can grab them quickly. I've never met a domestic dog that will take on my noisy screaming rage when I want them to back off. I have taken on 2 at a time circling my goats and I. Walking sticks make great weapons if needed. My mouth is the best weapon for domestic dogs but you have to have your goats under control and not giving the dog something to chase.
Good luck.
 

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My goats seem to know when dogs are coming up on us on the trail. They walk behind me on the trail but when a dog is coming from behind they get in front of me. That is when I put them on a lead and talk to the dog people as they approach. I have not had to use the dog dazer (although I have tested it on various dogs most of which react to it, only one large pit bull seemed unaffected by it). The goats this winter also display the same behavior when there are coyotes or cougars in the area based on the tracks I eventually found in the snow. I always carry a large can of bear spray and have not had to use it the two times I was close to grizzles (this was before I had goats). This summer my plan is to high line the goats close to my tent and bell one of them, which should be a good alarm system for any night time bears.
 

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Some people carry beer spray. When there is trouble a quick spray of beer to the mouth doesn't make the trouble go away, but it makes you not care about it.

I call my goats to my side if I know there are dogs approaching. And I sneeze as a warning to them to be alert. I carry a shepherd staff which helps me catch if I need to, or bop a dog if I need to. Most often pointing it at the dog is sufficient warning that the owner calls it off. I also carry a dog dazer which works 90% of the time if you wait until the dog is within 10-12 feet to maximize the startle effect. The other 10% is a real pain having waited until they are nearly upon you ;-)

The absolute best protection is two angels with fiery swords by your side. These come with every visit to the cross. They might not fend off a dog, but whatever they do will be for your good.
 

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I've had several close calls with other peoples' dogs. In each case the dogs were intent on attacking my goats and no amount of yelling was going to stop them. Two were discouraged with whacks from my walking stick. One got a kick. Some others were discouraged with rocks and warnings to their owners. I've played with a Dog Dazer a bit and found that not all dogs are affected by it. To me it's just one more piece of gear to keep track of and be able to get into action quickly. So my walking stick is my best anti-dog defense.

I have never had a wild animal even come close. But there are certainly some around here. The mountain lions and wolves are the most worrisome to me. Just hiking around I don't think they are much of a threat, but when camped out at night I think things could be different. I keep bells on a couple of goats just so I can hear where they are and if something is chasing them. They bed down right near my hammock and don't venture far. So far no trouble.

I carry a .38 revolver just in case all else fails.
 

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I carry a .38 revolver just in case all else fails
Me too a small S&W 5 shot revolver and a plan to place some shots into the bear's brain through it's ear, mouth, or nose.

The point is always have bear spray and be prepared to use it first, since I am sure a 44 mag. will kill a bear but I fear he will not always die before killing or maiming me.

Here is a short link to what the experienced experts say about Bear Spray vs. Bullets.

http://www.udap.com/bearnews.pdf

enjoy and protect the wilderness
Joe
 

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I also carry a Dazer from Northwest Packgoats. I have used it on a couple of occasions with off-lead dogs that were a little too assertive. It worked very well and each time sent the dogs scampering back to their owners.
 

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The point is always have bear spray and be prepared to use it first, since I am sure a 44 mag. will kill a bear but I fear he will not always die before killing or maiming me.
Bear spray has the additional advantage that if it doesn't work on the bear, you can always spray yourself real good with it. You will be happy to have the bear put you out of your misery. It may, however, violate the safe practices codes since it habituates the bear to like spicy meals. ;-)
 

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Counter Assault Bear Spray is manufactured here in Kalispell Montana where I have lived since 1979.
They have shown actual testing done on Alaskan Brown bears and after seeing them I was convinced to use spray as my first line of defense, (after packing a large and heavy 44 mag. for years)

What Bob said is actually true in that some people have been reported actually spraying themselves with it. Many of these same types of people are probably against pack goats too.
you can always spray yourself real good with it
Personally maybe I have been lucky but all my bear encounters have ended in the bear running the other way.
I often break one of the rules in bear safety in that I enjoy being quiet while traveling through the woods which has led to being close to bears on a number of occasions...and finding bear bells in piles of spicy smelling bear scat has led me to believe they don't work either.

Here is a link to some actual stories by people who have used the spray and lived to tell about it.
http://counterassault.com/
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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Hey Mt.goatguy. I grew up a few years in Kalispell. You ever take a knee at the Moose lodge there in town? My step mom Sharrie used to run that places a few years ago till they moved to Plains. My dad Bob is over here in Washington State in Dayton now.
 

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They actually don't poop as much as you might think. They eat very little for their size & since I feed them raw, their stool is tiny, just a bit larger than coyote stool, & similar in composition, being mostly hair & processed bone. And they tend to go waaaay off trail to poop. If they go close to the trail, I bury it or pack it out (depending on where we are), but it's rare I can even find it, despite seeing them make their deposits.
 

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CASDOG1 said:
I use these for protection on the trail:

https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/20690_570657659626867_1815739446_n.jpg

https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/563600_570071939685439_1307222061_n.jpg

They work against wild predators, loose dogs, & dangerous humans (I hike where that serial killer stalked for almost 20 years). They never need to be reloaded, they won't misfire or spray back into my face, & they have the added bonus of helping me keep warm if I need it. :cool:
First one looks like an Anatolian or a Kangal? Not sure on the second pic., what breed is this? Good looking dogs. I have an Anatolian who guards the goats and goes with us on the trail.
 

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CASDOG1 said:
They're both Central Asian Shepherds. The fawn is a rough coat & the brindle is a smooth coat. They're livestock guardians & personal protection dogs. :cool:
Great looking LGD's!
 
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