Pygmy's as meat goats ?

Discussion in 'Meat Market' started by halvey, Feb 25, 2008.

  1. halvey

    halvey New Member

    7
    Oct 8, 2007
    Minnesota
    We have 2 pygmys that are about 10-11 months old. I know it's not typically done, but can these be butchered? How much meat can I expect from a 40 lb live weight goat? What's a fair price to process? I'd be sending these to a processor and probably just get sausage made.

    Any help is appreciated.
     
  2. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    pygmies are a meat goat so butchering them isnt' unheard of.

    Now as to how much - that I dont know, sorry :(

    Are you selling them live or are you selling the processed meat? That makes a difference in price.
     

  3. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    Yep, Stacey said all.
    Really any goat can and is a meat goat. It is just the fact that you do not her a lot of meat off of a Pygmy or a Nigi.
     
  4. alyssa_romine

    alyssa_romine Breaking Dawn Ranch

    Oct 4, 2007
    arkansas
    I am not sure how much you should sell the goat for....live weight, I was told no more than $1 per pound but I am not sure how much they are going for now.
     
  5. enjoytheride

    enjoytheride New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Humboldt Co Ca
    I get about 45 % meat to live weight on my boer bucklings. I pay $35 just to bring them in and the total cost for processing is about $75. They are usually sent at about 80-90 lbs.
    If the goats are healthy, you'd probably do better selling them as pets.
     
  6. Duchesse

    Duchesse New Member

    78
    Oct 31, 2007
    The Pygmy or Cameroon Dwarf goat originated on the west coast of Africa where there the meat is considered choice :yum: . Although I haven't done it myself they are well muscled and they are reported to process out to a little over half of the live body weight.

    As for the cost of processing you'd have to check locally, the price may be to high because of the small amount of meat. You may have to consider doing it yourself.
     
  7. halvey

    halvey New Member

    7
    Oct 8, 2007
    Minnesota
    Thanks to all for their responses! Duchesse, you kind of made me take the last leap and to go for it based on your "choice meat" comment! :wink:

    The earliest I can get these in is March 4th, as the processor just takes them on Tuesdays and Wednesdays weekly. So, any tips before I take them in? Not sure if I should just get them in ASAP or wait a bit? I hear the term "fatten up", but is there really anything between now and then I should do? I know of one guy who takes his goats to the live auction, and feeds them just grain the last few days. Not sure that'd work in my situation though.

    And any idea on the cuts I should get? Or maybe a mix with pork or beef or ? I've had a few Indian goat dishes before, and honestly, I couldn't tell much of a difference in taste between the meats, so I'm kind of thinking something kind of "safe", like a sausage or something like that. I'll probably get some stew meat, but beyond that, I don't know...
     
  8. enjoytheride

    enjoytheride New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Humboldt Co Ca
    My favorite pieces are the chops, shoulder steaks and ribs. The legs are a little toguher for me.
    Goats don't marble fat throughout the meat much if at all. So if they are fat, you just get lots of fat around the meat- which I personally don't like.
    I have never done sausages. Stew meat for me is a little tougher as this is basically the leftovers after the chops and steaks.
    i never grained after the first time- that goat got too fat for my taste.
     
  9. Duchesse

    Duchesse New Member

    78
    Oct 31, 2007
    I'm with Enjoytheride, I've never had chops, shoulder steaks, or ribs from a goat. Stew cuts and whole legs are all you can buy at the supermarket. Most of this goat is old and tough.

    Since you are blessed :angel2: to have a live young goat whose health status you are aware of partake of all the cuts. Chops, steaks, loin, ribs, stew and sausage.