quest womer

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by countryboy, Nov 18, 2009.

  1. countryboy

    countryboy New Member

    167
    Dec 7, 2008
    Can ya'll tell me ya'll toughts on wormer a 2 1/2 month old with quest? On the tube it says not to use it on ponies less thqn six months. Thank ya'll.
     
  2. RunAround

    RunAround New Member

    Feb 17, 2008
    Massachusetts
    I personally will never use quest on any of my animals. It is a very very strong dewormer and can cause death if overdosed. I would definitely not use it on a young goat.

    Some people have used it with success, but I wont touch the stuff. lol
     

  3. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    if you do a search there was mention of the dosage for goats with Quest not to long ago. Search button is to the left of the members button.

    When I spoke with a rep for the company who makes Quest she said to not give it to goats or sheep because the dosage is so small you could overdose them easily. Granted this was probably 10 years ago and they may have come up with a dosage amount.

    I did give quest to a very sick goat (was dying) and he survived -- had a different issue then just worms but maybe the quest was helpful to him......I was out of options so I just tried the quest. I probably wouldnt ever use it again though.
     
  4. countryboy

    countryboy New Member

    167
    Dec 7, 2008
    This is what I'm using on my adult does and just had to ask before I went out and brought something else.
     
  5. MysticHollowGoats

    MysticHollowGoats Guest

    101
    Sep 10, 2008
    Quest is the same meds as cydectin only stronger...the dose for goats is 1 cc per 100lbs
    To measure out the dose use a needle-less syringe and pull out the plunger and squirt in the gel...put the plunger back in and be sure you have you correct amount in it. Easy peasy!

    This is what I do since it it way more cost efficent for my small herd compaired to cydectin.
     
  6. kids-n-peeps

    kids-n-peeps New Member

    477
    Aug 24, 2009
    Virginia
    I have heard that this is a wormer of last resort for any age of goat . . . in that's it powerful and dosing must be specific. However, I've also read that if people start using this as a regular wormer, then eventually worm resistance will develop and then there will no longer be a powerful wormer that works (similar to antibiotic resistance in humans). I don't know if that is all 100% accurate, but my plan is to use other wormers & do fecal checks to make sure they are working. So long as the less potent ones are working, I hope to avoid quest.
     
  7. countryboy

    countryboy New Member

    167
    Dec 7, 2008
  8. Ariel301

    Ariel301 Guest

    101
    Oct 12, 2009
    I never used it on goats, but it was always very effective on my horse, even with a bit of an overdose...the syringes are labeled for something like a 1100 pound horse, and I had an 800 pound horse, so I would just give her the whole thing rather than have to throw out the leftover stuff or keep partly used tubes laying around. It never seemed to bother her. I heard about it being 'fatal if overdosed' and asked my vet about it...she said that the problem was really mainly in miniature horses being given a dose big enough for a full sized horse...I don't know why anyone would do that, but apparently it was happening!
     
  9. MysticHollowGoats

    MysticHollowGoats Guest

    101
    Sep 10, 2008

    Moxidectin is Moxidectin....either you use more of the purple stuff (Cydectin) or less of the clear gel (Quest) they r exactly the same wormer in different strenths. Either way you will get the same amount of the wormer if you dose it accurately.
    If you use any one wormer long enough it will become ineffective and this is what causes resistance. I agree with doing fecals before (to be sure it's needed) and after worming (to be sure it still working).
     
  10. kids-n-peeps

    kids-n-peeps New Member

    477
    Aug 24, 2009
    Virginia
    Absolutely right about resistance from what I've read and heard :wink:

    I just thought that currently the cydectin class of wormers was the most potent available . . . IF that's true, that wouldn't be the wormer you would want to start with . . . it would be the wormer you would graduate to if/when the others stopped working for you. But my reasoning could easily be faulty - it wouldn't be the first time :shrug: Perhaps I'm just comparing it to human antibiotics too much . . . doctors prescribe the less powerful ones first and reserve the most potent to use only when absolutely necessary so that your body won't have built up any resistance to that antibiotic when you desperately need it.

    I have been reading some articles on wormers and resistance lately and I'll be the first to admit that I've read contradictory info!
     
  11. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    kids-n-peeps I agree -- start with something less strong and see if that works.

    FOr the health of the animal plus your pocketbook its always good.

    Reserving a more powerful wormer for like once a year worming is something I do as well. It helps to keep the wormer effective and you dont run out of options if the "strong" wormer becomes something the worms are resistant to.