Question about electric fencing/netting & fencing in general

Discussion in 'Barnyard Bananza' started by tararuns, Feb 21, 2010.

  1. tararuns

    tararuns Guest

    17
    Feb 12, 2010
    Someone reccomended to me that if I can't afford to fence in our entire acre, that I create a space for goats that could easily be moved around depending on the rate that they deplete the natural resources. Specifically, temporary electric netting was suggested because it's easy to move around.

    My kinda silly question, being new to all of this, is how would I get into an enclosure like that? :oops: I'm imagining creating this goat space and surround, but do I then need to buy and move around some kind of gate? I'm looking at products like this: http://www.premier1supplies.com/fencing.php?mode=detail&fence_id=85

    In looking at the list of everything you'd need to set up something like that though, it doesn't necessarily seem all that cost effective, when you factor in a battery system, needing batteries constantly, etc...

    What kind of fencing systems do you all reccomend? I've mentioned in another thread being curious about an invisible electric fence with collars. I could create a more permanent space on the land, hopefully, without electric fencing, but what happens when goats forage all the greenery? I don't mean feed wise, as I plan on supplementing with hay/possibly grain, but will 2 goats running around on 1/4-1/2 an acre just ruin the land? I'm asking this anticipating a potential landlady question...

    Thanks so much!
     
  2. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    you unplug it before you go into the enclosure.

    I have to use a battery due to the distance from the electrical outlet. There are clamps you use from the wire to the battery. I have yet to use this or get it all put together but I can let you know come spring
     

  3. kids-n-peeps

    kids-n-peeps New Member

    477
    Aug 24, 2009
    Virginia
    We have electronetting from Premier1, the one designed for poultry so that we wouldn't have any issues with kids getting entangled, etc. We really like ours, but I do want to point out that if it is the only type of fencing you have, you could run into problems if you get a lot of snow in your area. We have had two snowstorms this year of 20+ inches, which has put the electronetting out of commission for weeks at at time. If you don't have snow or it only snows a few inches where you live, I think you would be fine.

    Ours is connected to permanent fencing so we enter through our permanent fencing, but Stacey is right in that you just need to turn off the power and lift up an end pole to enter. We know someone who uses it this way, but he did buy the permanet - permanet poles are much sturdier for this type of entry use and if using it as your sole source of fencing.

    Our fencing is too far from an electrical sources, so we bought the solar charging unit. We love it when there isn't snow on the ground :)
     
  4. kids-n-peeps

    kids-n-peeps New Member

    477
    Aug 24, 2009
    Virginia
    In terms of ruining the land, I think this depends on a lot of factors - size/number of goats, rainfall/weather, condition of land, etc. Our permanent fenced-in area stays pretty lush throughout the spring/summer/early Fall, it's pretty icky during winter (muddy, beaten-down looking).
     
  5. tararuns

    tararuns Guest

    17
    Feb 12, 2010
    I'm in N. California about a mile from the ocean, so I think it's safe to say that we don't get much snow :wink:

    Ahhh...thanks, that's helpful. Someone in my area is actually selling a solar electric fence charger; I'll have to e-mail her.

    The land is interesting. About 1/2 the acre (where our houses are, the veggie garden and the "backyards" are all lush grass with apple trees. The back portion of the acre is heavily wooded with redwoods, ferns, etc. I'd be tempted to make the back portion of the acreage for goats, but I don't know how much of the forage back there they could eat, or rather how much could be dangerous to them!