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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking into testing my 3 does and I have a few questions.

1: Is Johnes accurate? Should I even bother with having it done? One lab says that it is recommended that your goat is 18 months old, so I guess I can’t do Racheal.

2: What labs are the best and reasonably priced?

3: Is it risky drawing blood yourself?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1. At least 2-ish years old for Johnes testing.
2. I know of this lab, other than that, there are a ton so I can't tell you which is the best and cheapest! http://ubrl.universalbiopharma.org/how-to-send-to-lab/livestock-diagnostics-collection-kits.html
3. It is risky, but of course people do it, you can watch videos and read about how to do it and certainly try it yourself if you feel comfortable, or you can have a vet do it, your choice!!
Okay, thanks! I don't know if I will test them for Johnes. It seems CAE and CL are the two most important. Do y'all test for it? And should I?
 

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We do the bio security panel as it’s about the same cost as just CL and CAE and doesn’t require any more blood. We used SageAg Labs, and she was very helpful. However it cost us a ton of money to overnight the samples to her since she is located in the middle of nowhere according to FedEx.

We drew our own samples. It’s not complicated but takes a few tries to get the technique down. Watching some videos helped, and a goat friend came to help show us how to do it the first time. Bucks are harder to draw on for me, their skin is so much thicker. I definitely recommend having someone help you hold their neck at the correct angle. It’s a useful skill to have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
We do the bio security panel as it's about the same cost as just CL and CAE and doesn't require any more blood. We used SageAg Labs, and she was very helpful. However it cost us a ton of money to overnight the samples to her since she is located in the middle of nowhere according to FedEx.

We drew our own samples. It's not complicated but takes a few tries to get the technique down. Watching some videos helped, and a goat friend came to help show us how to do it the first time. Bucks are harder to draw on for me, their skin is so much thicker. I definitely recommend having someone help you hold their neck at the correct angle. It's a useful skill to have.
Do you have to use overnight shipping? I think I read that you can use priority mail.
 

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I am looking into testing my 3 does and I have a few questions.

1: Is Johnes accurate? Should I even bother with having it done? One lab says that it is recommended that your goat is 18 months old, so I guess I can't do Racheal.

2: What labs are the best and reasonably priced?

3: Is it risky drawing blood yourself?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Most blood tests are not accurate under six months of age.
You will not kill your goat drawing blood no matter how many times you stick them.
 

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Is this true that Johnes is only accurate for 2 years and above? I tested my herd and it came up with 2 goats positive. A buck and I think he caught it from an old goat that died unexpectedly that I’m guessing now may have had it and a young doe that is about 21 months old. But I just can’t figure out how she could have caught it or where and she doesn’t look sick in any way. Thinking of retesting her. I just dont know what to do about her, she is so young, and pregnant. She is separated for now but I don’t want to expose the rest of the herd. Any ideas??
 

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I just went through disease testing my whole herd for the first time, and it does feel like a lot! Hang in there! As far as the Johnes testing, I believe you can do a test on a fecal sample that is considered to be more accurate, though, if I'm remembering correctly, it is more expensive than the blood test. I'm sure others will chime in with more information, but you should be able to look it up online, too. Johnes disease is definitely not something that you want in your herd, so I would recommend retesting the animals that came back positive with the more accurate test, even if they are not showing symptoms.
 

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Is this true that Johnes is only accurate for 2 years and above? I tested my herd and it came up with 2 goats positive. A buck and I think he caught it from an old goat that died unexpectedly that I'm guessing now may have had it and a young doe that is about 21 months old. But I just can't figure out how she could have caught it or where and she doesn't look sick in any way. Thinking of retesting her. I just dont know what to do about her, she is so young, and pregnant. She is separated for now but I don't want to expose the rest of the herd. Any ideas??
The doe.. when testing a pregnant doe or a goat under stress or illness you can absolutely get wonky test results.we actually got three this year. One was on my bred doe and two on bucks that had been penned all day and they are not usually penned so it was quite stressful for the guys. The lab told us to retest in six months. We did and everything was fine... but i also knew that there really was no way these goats were positive too. My bucks have been here for two years and clean tests and clean tests before here then the doe came from a herd that tests and has not had anything positive in their herd either. So ask the lab when they suggest you retest and redo it then.

I would at least wait a month after she kids to retest her. That way she is used to being a mama and is in the swing of that. So less stress.

Did your doe come from a tested herd and you saw results? Or was she not tested at all before? If you are worried it may be a true positive you may want to think about keeping her in a "throw away" space.... one that you can leave empty for a year if it is a true positive. Maybe a wether friend for her to live with. The wether can be processed for meat if she is a true positive. That way you do not lose breeding stock.

I am not sure if the fecal test would show a wonky inaccurate result on a bred doe but you can call the lab and explain the situation and ask if they think it would be a true result or not because she is bred.
 
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