*Questions and Help!!!!*

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by RowdyKidz, May 16, 2009.

  1. RowdyKidz

    RowdyKidz Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2009
    NW Ohio
    I have to give a demo for 4-H on like June 2nd and I know what I want to do it on. I just need a little help from you all.
    It is about "what to look for in breeds of goats" And I need help with:
    - Alpine
    -Saanen
    -Nubian
    -Oberhasli
    - Lamancha
    -Toggenburg
    - Boers/Boer Crosses
    -Angora
    - Fainting

    And I just checked, we don't have NDs at our fair.These are the breeds permitted at our fair.
    Thanks everyone!!! :hug: :hi5: :D
     
  2. Crissa

    Crissa New Member

    Oct 7, 2007
    Cashion, Oklahoma
    So what is it exactly that you need help on? Do you need pictures or just information?
     

  3. Cinder

    Cinder New Member

    736
    Mar 2, 2008
    Nubians: Loud, bawls ALL THE TIME for attention, finishes feed on the milk stand and starts a Flamenco Dance... oh wait... that's probably not what you meant! :ROFL:

    I'd suggest googling each breed and you should get tons of great info.

    Have fun.
     
  4. RowdyKidz

    RowdyKidz Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2009
    NW Ohio
    Both would be a HUGE help, but I don't want to sound lazy or anything...I am just grateful for what help I get! :)
     
  5. Crissa

    Crissa New Member

    Oct 7, 2007
    Cashion, Oklahoma
    I copied this off of the ADGA website.


    "Nubian

    The Nubian is a relatively large, proud, and graceful dairy goat of mixed Asian, African, and European origin, known for high quality, high butterfat, milk production.

    The head is the distinctive breed characteristic, with the facial profile between the eyes and the muzzle being strongly convex (Roman nose). The ears are long (extending at least one inch [2.54 cm] beyond the muzzle when held flat along the face), wide and pendulous. They lie close to the head at the temple and flare slightly out and well forward at the rounded tip, forming a "bell" shape. The ears are not thick, with the cartilage well defined. The hair is short, fine and glossy.

    Any color or colors, solid or patterned, is acceptable."

    I'll post a picture of a good roman nose. Although she could use longer ears, Lyric has a GREAT nose. lol

    [​IMG]

    And Orion has nice long ears.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. RowdyKidz

    RowdyKidz Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2009
    NW Ohio
    Thanks! You don't mind if I use your pics do you?
     
  7. Crissa

    Crissa New Member

    Oct 7, 2007
    Cashion, Oklahoma
    Nope I don't mind. :thumbup:
     
  8. K-Ro

    K-Ro New Member

    371
    Oct 13, 2007
    Texas
    Here is Alpine information:

    The Alpine Dairy Goat is also referred to as the French Alpine and registration papers for this dairy goat use both designations and they are synonymous. The Alpine dairy goat is a medium to large size animal, alertly graceful, with erect ears, offering all colors and combinations of colors with distinction and individuality of appearance. They are hardy, adaptable animals that thrive in any climate while maintaining good health and excellent production. The hair is medium to short. The face is straight. A Roman nose, Toggenburg color and markings, or all-white is discriminated against.

    There are some pics on my website of French Alpines.
     
  9. FourSnyders

    FourSnyders New Member

    134
    Mar 28, 2009
    Ohio
    If you want harness goat information as well I can help you out there. I even did a power point on how to train your goat to drive (pull a cart). Let me know if you are interested at all.
     
  10. RowdyKidz

    RowdyKidz Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2009
    NW Ohio
    Thanks K-Ro!!
    And FourSnyders, I would love info!! ;)

    All I need is Boer, Angora, and Fainting Goat info and I'm good. :)
     
  11. FourSnyders

    FourSnyders New Member

    134
    Mar 28, 2009
    Ohio
    Do you want to whole power point or just the info?
     
  12. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    For dairy you might want to talk about what things you should look for in all of the breeds EG dairy charecter, a nice long neck good depth and width plible skin good flat bone. straight legs toeing ahead, a globular well attached mammery system. You can talk about each breeds breed charecteristics.
    I dont know much about meat goats.
    beth
     
  13. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    The Boer goat was developed in South Africa in the early 1900s for meat production. Their name is derived from the Dutch word "Boer" meaning farmer. The Boer goat was probably bred from the indigenous goats of the Namaqua Bushmen and the Fooku tribes, with some crossing of Indian and European bloodlines being possible. They were selected for meat rather than milk production; due to selective breeding and improvement, the Boer goat has a fast growth rate and excellent carcass qualities, making it one of the most popular breeds of meat goat in the world. Boer goats have a high resistance to disease and adapt well to hot, dry semi-deserts. U.S. production is centered in west-central Texas, particularly in and around San Angelo. The original US breeding stock came from herds located in New Zealand. Only later were they imported directly from South Africa.

    Boer goats commonly have white bodies and distinctive brown heads. Like the Nubian goat, they possess long, pendulous ears. They are noted for being docile, fast growing, and having high fertility rates. Does are reported to have superior mothering skills as compared to other goats. Mature Boer bucks weigh between 110-135 kg (240-300 lb), and mature does between 90-100 kg (200-220 lb). Some do get heavier in pounds than the typical weight.....and
    they do come in different colors as well..
     
  14. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    pam. stop ! your making me jealous!!! :drool:
     
  15. keren

    keren owned by goats

    Oct 26, 2008
    Australia
    First and foremost in any breed you should look for conformation - structural soundness. This includes correct angulation in the legs (no cow hocks, weak pasterns, post legs etc) as well as a good strong, straight back (not roached or dippy). Long and deep bodies with well sprung ribs.

    Second should be reproductive traits, which includes a host of things. Well laid in shoulders, feminine head and neck in does, masculine in bucks. Large pelvic capacity. Neat and tidy udders in females (adhering to the breed standard for number of teats), well formed testicles in bucks.

    Thirdly should come your breed character traits - dairy character if it is a dairy breed plus the specifics of each breed. Meat character if its a meat breed plus the specifics of each breed.

    I'll give you some info on the angora.

    Firstly, the angora should be a structurally correct goat with good reproductive ability.

    The angora should carry a fleece which is even in length and type from front to back; fleece should be assessed on the neck, rib, and rump and in these three places it should look the same. Thicker locks on the neck and rump are penalised against (though not a fault). Locks should be long (1 inch growth per month). The fleece should be lustrous; it should be very soft to handle. Examine the fleece on the topline and top of neck where the natural part falls - look for medullated fibres (fault) which appear as a coarse, bright white hair similar to the hair on a dairy or boer goat. The fleece should be dense. The face should be neither too muffled or too bare. There should be even coverage of mohair over the entire body including the belly and tail. The angora should have a straight or slightly dished nose, never roman nosed. The ears are pendulous. Horns may be any shape but allow for a shearing handpiece to fit under easily. The angora should be a large framed goat in order to carry a large amount of fleece.

    This doe is a very good example. She is a large doe with a strong, straight back. She carries a lot of mohair which is long, even from front to back, and soft handling. Her biggest fault is she is slightly too muffled (covered on the face) which means she needs to be wigged (face trimmed) frequently to prevent blindness.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    :wink: :hug: LOL ...thanks Katrina... :D
     
  17. RowdyKidz

    RowdyKidz Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2009
    NW Ohio
    Just the info is fone. I don't have the equipment to do a power point. :)

    Thanks everyone! All this info really helps! I owe you guys big time! :D
     
  18. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    your so welcome.....RowdyKidz..... :wink: good luck on your project..... :greengrin: :thumbup: