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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, following up on one of my previous posts, we had a little one who had a massive lump that turned into two lumps (in one?). We rushed him to the vet and the vet lanced the two lumps, freeing a rather large amount of pus that had no foul odor. The vet had us isolate the mother, the little one, and his brother until we had test results back. I have been attempting to help Dean, the infected one, by keeping gauze wrapped around his neck after a hot compress and a betadine soak to the open wound. Its been just over a week, and we have yet to get the test results. I'm almost positive it's CL, even though the swelling and inflammation have gone down significantly. We were fortunate that the abscess didn't burst on it's own, but now I'm noticing another little one with a smaller lump in the same place. The vet said that if it is CL, we'll do blood tests on the others to see if they're positive too. What has to be done if they are? I've heard the term "culling" being passed around, but I'm not 100% sure what that entails.
Also, how did this one get CL if not from pus from someone else? Is it genetic? I have no idea what I'm doing and my boss (the owner) is clueless as of what's going on. Help.
 

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Culling usually means death. You can take them to an auction that is for meat if you don't want to put them in your freezer.
 

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7 does - 2 bucks - 1 wether
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Culling usually means to harvest, but some use it as a term that they won't use the goat as breeding stock. CL is not genetic, it is a disease and is transferred through direct contact with the pus.

I would wait to get results back. There are a lot of good threads on CL management ... and a lot of options for you. :hug:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, the vet finally called. The abscess was not CL, it was just an abscess (which is really weird). This is good, but now I need to catch the other little one who is developing a lump in the same place and take him to the vet.
ProTip: when taking little ones to the vet, we found that a 40 gallon trash can is marvelous since they can't jump out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm not sure where he sent it to. But I have attached a photo of Dean before he went to the vet and had it lanced. The hair over it was beginning to fall off and the skin was flaking, so it was getting ready to pop on its own (which would have been awful). He's a month old, and was born with a smallish lump that grew over the past month. I also included a photo of the other goat with a lump in the same place, but he's roughly the same age and I don't think his was there since birth. He's going to the vet soon too, but his isn't quite as large as Dean's. Both goats are very energetic and putting on weight normally. Dean was actually 20lbs when we took him in.
 

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