Rejected Kids

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by 7acreranch, Mar 18, 2010.

  1. 7acreranch

    7acreranch New Member

    140
    Mar 8, 2010
    Eastern OK
    Some of you may remember that I had a doe kid out and totally reject the kids. We were milking and feeding the kids, but felt that they needed to be with the other goats. We have an area that we had set up as a kid safe place.to put them when we cant watch them. We slowly put them out to get accustomed and forced them on their dam They have no problem problem feeding on her but she does not like it and if she is alone with the kids she is dangerous (she flipped on in the air with her horn for no reason my son caught him before he hit the ground. My main question is how often should they feed off of her, for the last 4 days we have been head staling her 3 x a day and let them suckle to she is dry. They are 19 days old seem healthy and playful. They are not alone at night our wether is their friend and he has been real good playing with them in their area and also in the main area.They are beginning to nibble on hay and a bit of feed.
     
  2. DebMc

    DebMc Member

    845
    Dec 10, 2009
    Is there a reason why you can't switch over to bottle feeding them formula? It sounds like the feedings off mom are stresssful and hazardous for all. If so, I'd start bottle feeding them. And it'd probably be less work than forcing your uncooperative doe to let the babies nurse off her.

    Deb Mc
     

  3. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    really every 2-3 hours they should be nursing.

    To me it would be easier to bottle feed but I guess if you dont mind holding the mom and it isnt to much effort that works too.
     
  4. 7acreranch

    7acreranch New Member

    140
    Mar 8, 2010
    Eastern OK
    We had a scour problem with the milk replacer. They have no problem with mommas milk. We were hoping we could get her to bond with the kids. We try not to stress her.
     
  5. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    at this point they are not going to bond as mom and kids -- but they can bond as a herd but dont expect mom to care for them ad let them nurse on their own
     
  6. keren

    keren owned by goats

    Oct 26, 2008
    Australia
    at this point they are not going to bond with their mum. especially since you had them on bottles for a little while.

    yes, you are stressing the mum. yes, you are stressing the kids. I'm sorry I dont mean to be blunt but I just dont see this as a good situation for any involved.

    honestly I would just put the kids back on to bottles - you mentioned a problem with the replacer, so if you cant get goats milk (and milking mum is too much of a pain), just buy cows milk from the supermarket. the normal stuff people drink. I've raised babies on it before no problems. or if you are near to a dairy (cow or goat) ask to buy some milk from them.

    otherwise, if you want to continue holding mum for them to feed, really at 19 days if they were on the bottle they could get away with 2 feeds a day. So its the same with feeding off mum. My preference would be 3 times a day but as I say, they would survive on 2.

    If you are dead set on them being with other goats, I would isolate them with the wether - as you say he is good with them. I would not leave them in the main herd with the mum as she is being malicious to them

    good luck with them, whatever you decide :)
     
  7. goatnutty

    goatnutty Active Member

    Oct 9, 2007
    South East,IN
    I too would just pull them and put them on bottles....we typically don't use replacer either goats milk is more expensive so we typically use whole cows milk.
     
  8. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    you could milk out the dam and bottle feed them the milk, I've grafted kids and its not that difficult, but it sounds like even after 19 days shes not going to take them ...
     
  9. dvfreelancer

    dvfreelancer New Member

    192
    Aug 15, 2009
    Just understand one thing if you go that route...you're momma. And that's a responsibility you're going to own until they can eat solid food.

    Leaving them out with the herd in between feedings might help. Our bottle baby never would associate with the other goats. We had to rehome her as a pet.

    The adults are tough on babies. They horn hook them, toss them around, pound them into the ground. I've had a couple injured, one has a permanent limp. I was hoof trimming one of the younger ones and the older nannies all took the opportunity to come over and try to head butt her while I was holding her.

    It's a rough world for a little goat. :sigh:
     
  10. goatnutty

    goatnutty Active Member

    Oct 9, 2007
    South East,IN
    Just understand one thing if you go that route...you're momma. And that's a responsibility you're going to own until they can eat solid food.

    Leaving them out with the herd in between feedings might help. Our bottle baby never would associate with the other goats. We had to rehome her as a pet.

    The adults are tough on babies. They horn hook them, toss them around, pound them into the ground. I've had a couple injured, one has a permanent limp. I was hoof trimming one of the younger ones and the older nannies all took the opportunity to come over and try to head butt her while I was holding her.

    It's a rough world for a little goat. :sigh:[/quote]
    That is very true and a good point...it is a lot of work..
     
  11. 7acreranch

    7acreranch New Member

    140
    Mar 8, 2010
    Eastern OK
    We have decided that we will milk their mom and feed them by the bottle. Next question is how much should they be getting a day. If we are a short we can mix it with re placer that didn't seem to bother them much when we did it before. I have some unmedicated kid feed being delivered to my feed store tomorrow so we will we see how it goes.Thanks for all the help. Its odd the rest of out little herd has accepted them but momma is the only problem. Our other doe who is due any day is not super happy when they try to nurse off of her.
     
  12. goatnutty

    goatnutty Active Member

    Oct 9, 2007
    South East,IN
    What breed are they? The larger breed he more they eat...lol I have a schedule that pur vets wife and he came up with and use at their farm...it works very well. They raise full sized dairies and it works ok with the boers too.
     
  13. 7acreranch

    7acreranch New Member

    140
    Mar 8, 2010
    Eastern OK
    They sire was 100% boer dam was 75 kiko 25 boer
     
  14. Haviris

    Haviris Member

    430
    Oct 7, 2007
    Personally I feed bottle kids as much as they want to eat (my current kids are eating 4 times aday), if they've been limited at all you'd have to take it slow (they tend to want to over eat when they think it's going to be taken away).
     
  15. goatnutty

    goatnutty Active Member

    Oct 9, 2007
    South East,IN
    With the boer buckling I just bottle raised he ate 4 times a day for the first few days then 3 times a day...eating as much as they wanted at the time but maxing out at 20 ounces per feeding. This is the schedule he came on so I didn't want to change it and he is currently around 50 pounds and under 3 months and is looking great.
     
  16. keren

    keren owned by goats

    Oct 26, 2008
    Australia
    each kid is individual in how much milk they take

    the easiest way to do it is to watch their sides (flanks) when they drink. after a bottle you want their sides to be straight, not hugely bulging out (a little tiny bulge is ok) and not sunken in.

    but if you want a rough rule of thumb I would feed these kids about 1L (33 - 34 ounces) broken into 2 - 3 feeds a day. watch their sides and adjust accordingly. watch for scours and bloat.
     
  17. Jekka_Lynn

    Jekka_Lynn Member

    55
    Mar 19, 2010
    My father-in-law has raise billy's for meat on two feedings a day of whole cow milk mixed about half and half with water and as much as they wanted to eat at a time. When I raised mine I put them on whole cow milk mixed 2/3 milk 1/3 water and the milk we got from our goat thrown in and as much as they wanted to drink at first it was 5 times a day, then 4, then 3 until they lost interest. They were a month old when I got them and I managed to get the nanny to feed one of them and when I got a second nanny about a month later I got her to except the two month old baby. Neither nanny had enough milk so I still fed them three times a day as much as they wanted. They both grew to be normal sizes. I got the nannies to accept them by milking each nanny a bit and rubbing it all over the kid I wanted that nanny to accept, make sure to leave some for the kids to try to drink. Once they where good and covered I let the nanny sniff them then put them onto the nanny with their bum towards the nanny's head so she could sniff them as they drank. It worked both times. Make sure to keep a hold of the nanny until she is good and relaxed about them drinking.