The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Member
Joined
·
1,147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm interested in hearing everyone's own experiences with this process...
I don't just want the bad (Yes, I am aware that they are MANY bad ones), but I would also like to hear the good (since I know there are good experiences out there as well!).

Would be nice to know what to expect from this experience...

We decided to band the horns on our 4 and 1/2 year old doe, because she is the Alpha doe in my tiny herd of 4, and was getting a too aggressive with the 3 smaller doelings (2 being her own daughters, although they were bottle fed).
Chloe's horns resemble 'sheep' horns, in a way that they curl down and around her neck, instead of up and out at a soft curve (like normal goats)... ****photo below****
The horn on the other side (not pictured) curves around even more than that...
Because of the shape of her horns, she managed to get another goats leg caught in her horn on more than one occasion, and I had to restrain her to get the leg out... With one twist of her neck, she would have broken the leg!

So we made the tough decision to band her horns...

The bands have been on for about a month (they were put on on October 9th). About a week later, you could see that the bands were starting to "sink" in.
Now it is about 5 weeks later, and it appears that they have eaten about half way thru the horns, and the horns are starting to feel a bit looser (although are not 'loose' yet).

I have patience, and I'm aware that it can take a long time, especially in colder weather.... And since we are in Alaska, and it's mid-November now, well, let's just say that it's COLD...

She DOES show some discomfort, and isn't using her horns like she used to (but that was kind of the point).

I just hope the whole thing goes smoothly, and that everything 'falls' off as it should.... But what worries me, is that the bands are cutting thru the back of the horn, and there really isn't much going on in front...

Any advice with regard to the "Banding of Horns" would be much appreciated. (especially with respect to adult goats)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
First off I want to say I have Absolutely NO experience with this. What I do have is info that a 4-H Judge told me. She said to take one of those flexable metal hand held horn saw and just etch in at the base of the horn closest you can get all the way around about 1/8 th inch depth then put the band on, this helps on 2 levels, guides your band while holding it in place so it doesn't slip off that way the pressure starts to cut in all the way around. Once thew they "should" just fall off when finished, but that's of course as you are aware not always the case so to make sure you have blood stop powder or Cayenne powder on hand as well as a disbudding iron handy incase it breaks off early and you need to sear it.
Reading what you said and thinking about what she told me, you might be able to take a horn saw and maybe knitch the area its not cutting into to give it a better start. Just a thought but I am sure someone else is much more knowledgeable about this will chime in. :confused::scratch:

Please let me know how it goes, I am seriously thinking about doing the same thing with our Alpine doeling as she is the only one with horns and she will use them to her advantage. The vets around here say they "think" they can do it, but that they would be putting her under (which I have found Goats don't do well on) and literally cut INTO there sinuses and there will be a open wound that allows things straight into the wound if she manages to get it off. That includes drowning to death in a heavy rain if she doesn't go inside soon enough (including soaking threw the bandages) While right now Im not so worried about rain, it is winter here and we have been getting snow, so if for some reason she would get it off during the night while we are asleep and she was outside when it snowed it could melt into there OR if she is in th barn with everyone else and gets it off, something could happen who knows. THis is just what the vet here told me, so the Banding while may cause some discomfort is something I may end up doing. I would rather have my girl deal with some discomfort then die. My boer girls came from a home where everyone else had horns, so is used to it, but my other girls are not and I can see how they cant defend them self safely the way the Boer girls do. She has used her horns on my milking does bag a couple times, and on her gut, I am talking the points here. SO dehorning her is not an option it is a must for the safety of my heard as well as my grandchildren.

Also the vet did say there was still no guarantee that they wont grow back or that the removel of the horns wont cause death (not the anesthesia) durning the surgery. So far I haven't heard of that happening from banding, not that there isn't the risk, just haven't heard of it "yet"
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
59,892 Posts
You need to replace the bands monthly. Put 2 on.

I did an adult female with very mature horns and full size goat. It took over 8 months for her. But time depends on the horns.

I would do it again if I had to but will just stay away from horned goats.

I followed the instructions from Helmstead Minis.

If you do a search on here you will find a couple threads on it.
 

·
Goat Girl
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
I did two does one time. They were about a year old, so their horns weren't very long. I shaved the hair at the base of the horns and then put the band on all the way at the bottom. I actually got mine just below the hair line to where it kind of went underneath the horn. I put duct tape over the bands to keep them from rubbing off and turned them loose. I think it took about 3 months for them to come off but they came off pretty nice. One doe did have one she knocked off early and she was bleeding a lot, but I just threw a whole bunch of flower on it and it stopped bleeding.

With horns that are slanted back like that they probably will be harder to do because you can't get the band on as far down in the back as you can when the horns stand more upright.
 

·
Look for me in the barn...
Joined
·
1,054 Posts
I did it this past winter/spring on two of mine who had been disbudded but still grew sizable scurs... I'm glad that I did it because I like that they don't have horns anymore but the process wasn't fun. Watch for signs of illness and check temps (both of my girls wound up with infections) and they all broke off too early and there was quite a bit of blood, so have blood stop powder, flour, or cayenne powder handy. Doing it in the winter is a good idea because there aren't flies or other bugs to worry about.

I don't like doing it and I hope I never have to do it again. But I'm glad it's done.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
1,147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Is that an abscess on her neck?
Nope, just the way she turned her head I guess. :)

Thanks guys. It's a bit late to turn back now, but I am glad (as of now) that we won't have horns to worry about soon. I also agree that winter is a good time to do it. No bugs! LOL The only thing is that I hear it takes a bit longer during the winter...

Chloe has been up and down in her moods during this whole thing. It is 5 weeks today since she had the bands put on, and so far, so good.
First 2 days were tough. She was NOT a happy camper.
I don't want to replace the bands, because she looks like she is going to die if I try to mess with her, so we added a couple spares over the top of the ones that have already sunken in... (Lucky, because one broke!)
I think as time passes, I am just going to add another band to tighten the 'squeeze'....

I DID manage to find a nice website that talks about banding, and is the reason I went ahead and did it.

http://www.goatworld.com/articles/disbudding/dehorning.shtml

They make it sound so easy there! LOL
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top