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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We purchased a baby and I had it at the vet two days later for a health check, vaccines and a fecal done. It showed it had coccidi and needed treatment because it had diarrhea. I returned the baby the next day. I feel bad returning it but at the same time I didn't feel it was my responsibility to pay for treatment when I paid top dollar for a healthy baby. I am out the vet check, fecal and vaccination cost but more concerned that I could have infected my herd. I noticed wet under his tail when I purchased him but was assured it was just because of a diet change to rich ground. I hope he is able to recover but I am more nervous than ever buying another baby. Do you ever relax when owing goats?!
 

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Hi there. Don't feel bad about returning an animal you bought because of health problems. In my opinion, it is important for a seller to give the buyer full discloser for any health issues an animal is having.

That being said, some goats don't take the stress of moving very well. The stress can cause health issues to pop up that the seller would have had no way of knowing were there.

In the future there are some things you can do to ease your mind. First of all, buy from a herd that is tested for Johnes, CL, and CAE. This way you know there is nothing permanent the new goat can infect your herd with. Quarantining new goats for thirty days is important as well in order to not risk infecting your herd.

I like to give goats that I purchase a dose of probiotic even right before they leave their farm as well as the days following their purchase, due to diet change and stress. Offering a bucket of electrolytes is a good idea as well.

A fecal soon after purchasing is not a bad idea since parasites often take advantage of the goat's heightened stress level. However, sending a sample to Meadow Mist labs is very inexpensive ($6) likely a lot cheaper than your vet. 馃槈 Although I see that you are in Canada, and I don't know if they accept samples from there.
 

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Good advice 鈽濃槤鈽

We always give toltrazuril for coccidia prevention before babies leave because we know stress can cause a bloom. On top of what was shared above..always ask if babies were on coccidia prevention and what was given and last dose. Be prepared to treat preventive when baby gets home because coccidia needs prevention until 3 to 4 months old.


Best wishes
 

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Always know that even if the breeder gives cocci prevention and is healthy at the time of purchase, the stress of the move can cause a "bloom" in parasites and worms. To me - this is just a part of getting kids who can stress easily. Do ask before purchase what prevention has been given - but even with the best breeder management this can happen.
 

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I agree, stress can do a lot in such a short amount of time.

If you took the goat to the vet after purchase, that was a good thing to do and caught things early.
The cost would be on you thereafter for health care.
 

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I usually treat new kids coming in with toltrazuril as a preventative. I find especially with kids that I've had to travel a few hours to get, they usually have a coccidia bloom just from the stress. Even from top herds. If someone is picking up a kid from me and I know they're not local, I'll give the kid a preventative dose of toltrazuril before pickup too. Probiotics too whenever possible.

Good for you for being vigilant, but it's a pretty typical occurrence as other posters have said ;) All goats have some level of coccidia so it's not going to infect your herd. Usually it only becomes a problem when a stressful event like weaning or travel causes a coccidia bloom.
 

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Your herd already has coccidia. You personally probably even have coccidia. It is everywhere. Most people and animals can handle the load and have a good immunity to handle it. Kids even from the best of herds don't have the immunity yet to handle coccidia, especially when being taken from their current environment and going to a new one.

That is fine that you decided you didn't want to deal with it and maybe there is more to the story that we don't understand. But keep in mind for the next purchase no matter how expensive that the kid can end up with a coccidia bloom. Maybe ask the seller to automatically start the kid on coccidia treatment before you pick up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you for all the great information. I will be more careful where I buy from and any sign of diarrhea I won't purchase, I took their word and didn't go with my gut. I'm sure it wasn't intentional on the sellers part though.
 

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Any new goat of any age, that I purchase is quarantined for 30 days. Some are transported, some I drive home. I dont disagree with what you did. Thats fine. But I like to keep all new away from my herd. The environmental change, and stress can bring out all kinds of changes in the goat. And for me its alot less expensive, and worry free to treat 1 goat, other than my 32 goats.
 

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Yes unless the goat is 100% healthy don鈥檛 risk it. There is a good possibility that it was a diet change to start with and between being stressed of the diet change and the move it turned into a overload of cocci. Some breeders will not take a animal back because they don鈥檛 want to risk their herd, I don鈥檛 because I don鈥檛 with most of my buyers because I鈥檓 not 100% sure they have healthy goats. But I also won鈥檛 let a animal leave to their new home unless totally sound and healthy, even if it鈥檚 something stupid that I know will be fixed easily and won鈥檛 risk the buyers herd.
And Moers Kiko boer is absolutely correct! That quarantine time is so very important for the safety of your herd. If you don鈥檛 have a quarantine pen I would go ahead and set one up ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
He was kept separate except for travelling in the same vehicle to the vets with all my others but he was in a carrier. My other goats have no parasites and I will be more cautious if I decide to purchase another in the future. I am just glad I did the vet check so quick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes my animals are healthy as am I and I plan on keeping it that way, I am sorry you have parasites on your farm and personally. That is terrible and must be a scary thing.
 

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She is saying that every goat, every livestock, every animal, and human has parasites. It's not a scary thing, they always have them at low levels unless there is a stressful situation or environmental/management issue that makes it bloom into a heavier load. Coccidia is in the ground everywhere, all animals have it.

It's your right to take the kid back. But kids stress when they leave, they usually have a cocci bloom after moving to a new farm. That's why most breeders tend to give a dose of cocci meds or treatment when they get the kid. Picking up a kid, driving with it, taking it to the vet, can all cause a bloom no matter how healthy the kid was to begin with. Chances are you could see that in the fecal if you took every kid you picked up right away to the vet. However, I wouldn't buy one that actively was scouring at the time of picking up. I plan our pickups and give our kids cocci prevention and other stuff to help with stress...if they are scouring, we reschedule pick up until it's diagnosed and cleared up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I don't know what you want me to say, I'm not bragging that my herd doesn't have it and I am not bashing people that have it in their herd. My fecals are clear and the two other babies I purchased from a different farm are clear as well. This breeder wanted the kid back to treat it herself so I returned him. To me it does sound scary because goats can die from it and not fully recover from having it and it can spread through a herd. We just have different views on it, I am just thankful I don't have it here.
 

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We are just trying to let you know that it is impossible for animals (and even humans) to be 100% parasite free. Even if your goats have clean fecals, they still have a small number of parasites, that for whatever reason are not showing up in the fecal. So it's not like your herd could get infected with parasites from another goat because they didn't have them before. They still could, but not because they didn't have them before. Make sense? 馃槒 They do have them now, that's what we are trying to say. They are just at a level that they don't show up.

We know you are not bragging.馃槈 And I'm hopeful that I'm not coming across as augmentative, I'm just trying to explain the situation. 馃檪
 

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I agree with Mellon friend. Not trying to be argumentative but getting that point across.

That is fantastic that you haven't had to deal with them and likely due to your hard work preventing and possibly maybe even where you live, rgeat job and I'm sure it makes having a herd most enjoyable! We have some wet and humid seasons here and it can cause some overloads (even with lots of prevention), but we've never had loss of life or long term effects of having them as we catch it very early if it happens. But climate does have an effect on various herds as well. I wish we lived in a much drier climate, we'd probably deal with it a little less!
 
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