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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finally got decent pix of Stumpy's teeth and how they stick out. I know this is a fault but I am not sure what it is called.
Anyway, this disqualifies her from breeding. I am trying to find a pet only home.
The zoo won't take her, they only want polled for the Kidzoo (they have 4 of my goats there now.)
I really don't want to keep her all winter but at 21 pounds she's not really worth dressing out. She's 8 months old.
It will be a pain to keep her separate here.
I am pretty sure if I put her on CL, FB or through the sale, she'll just get bred anyway, which is what I am trying to avoid. (Ethical problem?)
I imagine those teeth, being totally unopposed, will need floating regularly.
Any ideas on what to do with her?
Goat Working animal Grass Groundcover Terrestrial animal


Eye Goat Grass Goat-antelope Terrestrial animal
Organism Gesture Finger Thumb Dog breed
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's just called an underbite?
Oh yeah, now I am wondering if I should cull that whole family line.
Her twin is normal mouthed. This was her mom's 2nd freshening, last year she had a normal single.
Both her mom & twin (and last year's kid) are taller,leggier goats.
Stumpy is built more like a tiny pygmy. She acts like a little bulldozer with the rest of the herd.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
She's currently separated out with 2 too young to breed does. I pulled them from the herd when I pulled Tick's buck apron on Nov.1.
He'll be put up for sale after breeding season, then I'll go back to one big happy until I get a new buck or get ready for a new breeding season.
I try to keep my herd around 10 does + one buck, mostly on pasture/field growth.
She doesn't seem to have eating issues right now, her back teeth are normal and she's chubby. She seems to grow wider, not taller!
She'd be smaller than a turkey if dressed out now.
You can see how tiny her horns are, one of the other youngsters is about the same age and has twice the horns. Her sister is polled.
I think she may have issues eating in a couple of years because I think those teeth will keep growing/sticking out further and further.
I have been dosing her weekly with replamin, you can see the weird long back hairs sticking up from the crest of her back so she had some mineral issues.
Her newer winter coat is lush and plush and puffy. She's the knot-head of the bunch, but normal behavior.
As a baby she had some serious Cocci issues which is not usually a thing here. She can still be difficult to catch - fear of drenching, I think. I treated her 3 different times.
The last fecal was sort of a group fecal amongst the 3 girls and it was okay, nothing that warranted further testing.
I need to get a side shot of her face, she kind of looks like a pug dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I know a lady you can Gmail. She takes in deformed, hurt, sick, etc goats. She takes them in from all over the US. If your interested I could tell you how to get in touch? She has a "goat sanctuary". She takes very good care of all her goaties. I think she has like 105 goats?.... Probably more by now.
Where is her ranch?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I watched some of their websites but she's not that handicapped...
It's an impressive operation.
Over and over they stated that they are slowing/stopping intakes.
All the various prostheses are really impressive.
I would like to know more about the young goat with the helmet, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I am not rushing off to shoot her in the head but I also have a real knowledge of just how long it can take to place an animal. The best thing is for me to get the word out to as many as possible. Usually, eventually, something often turns up, (even for excess roosters).
Moving her is not critical at the moment and her health is actually the best it has ever been. Cuter is more now when she's little so it should be easier. I have the luxury of some time to find her a home. I am pretty sure her teeth can be safely maintained for years with a little extra care. But she cannot stay here. I keep a buck & accidents happen. I do not want the chance of Stumpy popping out weird babies.
I have a deep respect for animal sanctuaries and prefer to see their efforts go to more endangered animals, especially in these times & this economy. I have grown a deep distrust of what goat buyers promise, I do not want to put effort into this only to run into her next year, knocked up and scabby, at the sale barn. But I also have a practical side, am an omnivore and have been doing this goat thing a long time. Stumpy is the first I have ever had born with a severe but very survivable conformational defect. I don't want it passed on but she is an engaging little stinker and I will try to find her a home. So far the worst thing she's ever known is Corid drenching. It would be nice to keep it that way.
As a senior citizen who is about to retire, I can not let her become a running care & vet bill. There are local "sanctuaries" that expect you to contribute constantly to them if you place an animal with them. We also have "sanctuaries" that "rescue"animals and place/rehome them at a profit. As her breeder/owner, I will try to find her a home. As a farmer, sometimes animals go to God's Little Dinner party....Freezer Camp....
I also want Stumpy to be educational for y'all. You can read/study conformation guides all day long but nothing beats seeing a fault in real life. To see her unfortunate grin, to see her constantly licking her teeth because they dry out and hang up on her top lip, to see the angle and sharpness of the unopposed edges (the front edges have cut me several times while Replamining her), that gives you an understanding of why it is a fault and how it can progress to affect the animals future health.
Sorry for the epistle, just woke up after night shift -- it's good coffee!
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I'm glad that you are considering all options with her. I personally would butcher because it would be dangerous and expense to sterilize her. It would be different if she was a he and could be banded. I don't sell culls because it is all too often that a "pet home" one day becomes a backyard breeder. It can be as simple as someone deciding that after having a couple pet goats for a few years they want to get into breeding and they don't want to give up their pets so they get bred too, by accident or on purpose.
That being said, I agree with you that it could be a very management solution if you could find a sanctuary that would take her without having to pay for vet bills all the time. I wish you luck in finding a place for her!
That's also a very real fear - about people changing their minds later!
 
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