Safe-guard horse dewormer need help

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by WalnutGroveFarm, Sep 29, 2008.

  1. WalnutGroveFarm

    WalnutGroveFarm Senior Member

    Sep 27, 2008
    Southern Ohio
    Ok running a little bit short on cash this week bought a goat so threw me alittle short this week. How do you dose this to goats. I would say my goat only weighs probably 25 lbs. what would be the dosage for that. This is the paste dewormer it goes like 0 than 250 then 500 then 750 then 1000, how would I know how much to give them. Going to try to get some Valbazen in the next week or so but wanted to go ahead and get her wormed with something. Thanks
     
  2. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    what wormer are we talking about?

    Most horse wormers you need to triple or quadruple your goats weight and then give the dosage according to that weight.

    so figure your goat is 75-100lbs and dose accordingly. On horse paste wormers it is best to give more then not enough and you cant OD them on it (like ivermectin or safeguard)

    Do not follow the above instructions if you are using Quest!!!!!! If using Quest then follow the directions as written
     

  3. WalnutGroveFarm

    WalnutGroveFarm Senior Member

    Sep 27, 2008
    Southern Ohio
    Here is what is says on the box intervet safe-guard equine dewomer, 25 gram paste 10% 9100 mg/g)
     
  4. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    sometimes I wonder if my brain is attached to myhead!!!! you posted safeguard in the title! :hammer:


    yah triple your goats weight and dose her accordingly
     
  5. WalnutGroveFarm

    WalnutGroveFarm Senior Member

    Sep 27, 2008
    Southern Ohio
    Thanks ok now I was wondering if you give some today and then the next five days are just do it again in 10 days.
     
  6. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    That's OK Stacey ............. we have all felt like that one time or another.......:doh:
     
  7. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    10 days later.........................
     
  8. Julie

    Julie New Member

    464
    Oct 5, 2007
    Southern PA
    HOW TO FIGURE SAFEGUARD DOSEAGE
    Safeguard paste- 25gram paste 10% (100mg/1g) 22cc syringe.
    1 syringe worms 1100lbat2.3mg/lb 1cc=50lbs
    So 4.6mg/lb=550lbs 1cc=25lbs
    6.9mg/lb=257lbs=12.5lbs/1cc
    So for three times the dose here is some basic conversions
    12lbs=1cc
    15lbs=1.2cc
    20lbs=1.6cc
    25lbs=2cc
    30lbs=2.4cc
    35lbs=2.8cc
    40lbs=3.2cc
    45lbs=3.6cc
    50lbs=4cc
    60lbs=4.8cc
    70lbs=5.6cc
    75lbs=6cc
    80lbs=6.4cc
    90lbs=7.2cc
    100lbs=8cc
    125lbs=10cc
    150lbs=12cc
    175lbs=14cc
    200lbs=16cc
    250lbs=20cc

    Instead of following up with Safeguard ... perhaps you should follow up with Ivermectin or something stronger for the next dosage ... what do you guys think ? Or are you planning on following up with Safeguard, THEN after the follow up of Safe Guard giving a different brand (ivermectin for instanct) ?
     
  9. Julie

    Julie New Member

    464
    Oct 5, 2007
    Southern PA
    btw - have you checked the goat's eye lids ?? The color will tell you if there's an overload of worms.
     
  10. LatigoLiz

    LatigoLiz Boise Creek Boers

    55
    Sep 25, 2008
    Enumclaw, WA
    Huh? Please elaborate for a newbie.
     
  11. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    If the eyelids are a healthy pink color...there would be no worm/parasite load therefore...healthy goaty and no need to worm at that time.

    Hold the goats head with one hand and pull down gently on the bottom lid, you'll see the color...pink is healthy and pale to white needs attention immediately...wether it be a worming or a thorough check for lice and mites...these are blood suckers and can make a goat anemic when they are overloaded.

    Remember though that no goat is parasite free internally, it's only when the numbers get too high that they will cause a problem.
     
  12. LatigoLiz

    LatigoLiz Boise Creek Boers

    55
    Sep 25, 2008
    Enumclaw, WA
    OK, that all sounds good...but what if a goat is just plain dehydrated? I mean, that is one of the sign we lok for in horses, but not for worm load, just for capillary refill and dehydration and we check gums instead of eyelids. I am just trying to understand the science behind it. Or is this a purely old school kind of diagnosis method?
     
  13. Julie

    Julie New Member

    464
    Oct 5, 2007
    Southern PA
    Well hopefully you don't have to check regularly for dehydration in goats. I mean, hopefully there's no need for concern of dehydration. I could understand if there's a sickly goat, then it's a different story. But why would normal goats be at risk of dehydration if there's ample water supply, etc.(their needs are being met).

    To me, if I go down to my barn (where water is available to my animals 24/7) and check my goat's eye lids and they're pale ... it's due to worms. Not because they're dehydrated. Unless like I said, it's a sick goat who simply isn't doing well and isn't drinking. But just to go down and check eye lids on my normal goats - if their eye lids are pale, I feel it's obvious they have a worm overload.
    Then I know they need dewormed. Preferrably I cath it in time before the eye lids are horribly pale, maybe just a little slightish lighter pink ... so I could deworm THEN instead of letting it go till it is bad (pale).

    Here's some info on FAMACHA (checking the eye lid color for worm overload status)
    (unfortanately this chart is not in color ... sigh)

    http://adams.extension.psu.edu/FAMACHA.pdf (this form gives you the option of purchasing the chart)

    Here's a good page that explains it, plus has the chart in color :
    http://www.theikga.org/famacha_evaluation.htm
     
  14. Julie

    Julie New Member

    464
    Oct 5, 2007
    Southern PA
  15. Muddy Creek Farm

    Muddy Creek Farm New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Keokuk, Iowa
    I went to a clinic about FAMACHA. The way you are supposed to check eyelids is take the goat into the sun (very important for correct coloration) then you stradle the goat, so you are facing the same way as the goat is, then push in slightly on the top eyelid and the eyeball and pull the bottom lid down. The actual rim of the eyelid will be a paler pink but there will be more fleshy stuff that will be the "true" color. I need to get a photo sometime, I am no good at describing stuff!!!
     
  16. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ

    thats a very good point, and should be remembered when dealing with any animal with pale lids