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Hi i bought a goat when it was a little baby (lulu) , it was my first goat and i wasn't really experienced with goats, so when she grew up she got mastitis and i had no idea what was happening to her so i left to heal up and it did.(Now she's alright) she now only has 1 teat!

So now i got 2 doe babies from a goat and i am scared that they might get mastitis or any other sickness.

So please, i would like to know do i have to give them any medications, injections or anything for them not to have mastitis or any other sickness. Please!!!

Thankyou
 

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Sorry about your girl with only one teat, how long ago did it happen?
Your doelings will be fine, no need to give them anything.
Unless they start developing a hard lumpy hot udder.
 

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When they freshen and after they kid, watch their udders.
If they get tight, milk them(relieve them). That is were mastitis may start.

Also keep them in a clean area, bacteria can also start it getting into there orifices.

Sorry about your 1 teated Doe. :(
 

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Goat Girl
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You can vaccinate with Lysigin before they kid which will help prevent staph mastitis and you can vaccinate with J-Vac for E. Coli. Most people who use these will vaccinate the doe the fall before she is bred, follow up with the second dose (however many days it says on the bottle) then give another shot about 3 weeks before she kids. Both are made for cattle but I know several herds who use them in there goats. It isn't a sure way to prevent mastitis but can help against two of the more common causes. The best way is if you are milking the doe is to wash her udder before milking with an udder wash (I use chlorhexidine diluted down to a 1:10 with water in a spray bottle) then dip or spray the teats after milking with a teat dip/spray. Keep their barn clean and try to keep them from laying down within 30 minutes after being milked (takes about 30 minutes for the orifices to close back up after being milked) this can be accomplished by feeding them right after you milk so they stay occupied for a little while. If you notice any heat, swelling or tightness in the udder check it out. Wash the udder and your hands and get a clean vial and get a sample of milk and send to the vet is you suspect mastitis. Get a California Mastitis Kit (CMT) or just use some dish soap (like dawn) and regularly check a little bit of milk from each side for mastitis (Once a week or every other week) so you can monitor the doe and know what is normal for each one. At dry off, when I quit milking I always infuse each side of the udder with ToMorrow which is a mastitis product. This is just as a preventative in case the doe gets any bacteria in her udder during the dry period so she doesn't get mastitis. When you do quit milking, check the udder daily and if it is too full (to where the skin has no give) relieve her a little bit, spray or dip her teats and let her go and keep watching her until she starts to dry up (when her body begins to reabsorb the milk in the udder, the udder will soften and shrink up).

Most goats that are nursing kids should be ok, but a heavy milker should be relieved until the kids are taking enough of the milk to keep her milked out. If the kids can't keep up, just keep milking her out once a day so she doesn't get over full. Kids saliva is one of the best teat dips there is. If you keep an eye on their udders and the kids bellies and if you notice one side being fuller than the other, red or a kid that is not very full, check her udder as she may have mastitis. Most goats don't get mastitis, but some do. Some seem to be more prone to it especially if they have more open orifices which allow more bacteria in if they don't close properly.

If you do milk your does, clean your hands between each doe. If one gets mastitis milk her last so there is no chance of transferring it from the doe to your hands to the next doe as it can transfer that way when the bacteria from the infected milk gets on your hands and then gets on the next does' teats and makes it's way to her orifice.

Don't beat yourself up over it too much, even the top herds in the country will end up with a doe with mastitis once in a while.
 

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Mastitis isn't trasferrable. You should only be concerned if they start showing signs of mastitis. No need to do anything if there isn't a problem.
I have a tendency to want to disagree here, however I'm not quite sure if you were meaning physically? Not through direct contact, but transferable via bedding, water, or milkers (hands too!).
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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^^^ Agree mjs. The bacteria thats in the mastitis is transferable as you said, through things like bedding if the udder isnt cleaned after milking or leaks its contents. Its a pretty good idea to separate a doe with mastitis (at least one with a bad case) for just this reason.
 
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