Scared it's CAE!

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by goatmama2, Oct 13, 2008.

  1. goatmama2

    goatmama2 New Member

    178
    Oct 20, 2007
    Upstate New York
    We are awaiting test results, but I'm pretty sure Lily has it. Years ago we bought 2 goats and one went down on her knees and eventually had to be put down. The other we sold as a pet, as she was showing symptoms and the buyers were not going to breed her. Last year our buck, Thistle, went on his knees and we tried everything but eventually had to put him down, too. Now Lily has a bad back leg, swelling around the hoof and "knee" area. I've done compresses, aspirin, antibiotics...she is still limping and now her front knees look puffy. I guess my question is this...if it's CAE, what do we do? I have 3 other goats, too...do I need to get rid of all of them and start over? It would break my heart! But we don't keep kids, and I can't sell them if the herd is infected. Please advise, o wise ones! I know test results aren't always accurate, but I can't think of anything else this could be. Lily's been favoring that leg going on 3 months now. Thanks for your help. Brooke
     
  2. Sonrise Farm

    Sonrise Farm Guest

    Sep 18, 2008
    I don't know anything about CAE but you can read an article about it on Goat Library .com under diseases. hope that helps. :(
     

  3. goathappy

    goathappy New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Illinois
    Well I had a buck Caesar that came down with something that was like CAE, he lost weight, both his front knees swelled up and contracted, his back legs contracted, he was basically a cripple when we decided to put him down.

    We tried everything for him and nothing seemed to work. He tested negative for CAE, which I don't believe the results because there seems to be no way he couldn't have had it. We have never had another goat show up with signs. A couple of breeders suggested mycoplasma arthritis, they say that mimics CAE, but we never got the right stuff from Caesar to test him for that so we'll never know.

    CAE seems to be a really tricky disease to figure out. The main ways it is spread is milk, blood and birthing fluid, it hasn't been proven that it can be spread by saliva.

    When you test for CAE, it is really important that you send to a lab that is certified to do CAE testing, Washington State, Colorado and Texas A&M are a few that are certified for the test. Labs that aren't certified cannot be trusted for accurate results.

    Caesar started favoring his one front leg, then his knee started to swell, then the other knee, then they started to contract and it all went downhill from there. CAE affects two or four joints, not just one. In the end it was all four for Caesar.

    This is one thing I didn't try, I would try it if I were you. Check out this herbalist's site: http://www.firmeadow.com We've been working with her for about 5 months now and she is really knowledgeable about goats and may be able to help you.

    Good luck.
     
  4. SDK

    SDK New Member

    Jun 26, 2008
    Yucaipa ca
    i had a goat like that once, but he was a baby, he got so crippled he couldn't stand at all so we put him down
    but the autopsy showed a bacterial infection in his joint fluid, but it was reallly similar to CAE

    i hope for you it isnt CAE
     
  5. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    Oh I am so sorry that you are having to go through this. I sure hope that it is not. Do you know where the blood was sent to for analysis? Goathappy is exactly right - make sure that it is a certified lab running the tests so that you receive very accurate results.

    If it is CAE you can keep them and breed but you must pull immediately at birth and bottle raise - then you will not be 100% clear on the kids, but you have a pretty good chance of them not being infected. If this is not an option, then I would look at pet homes and "start" over. Now I am not an expert of CAE, but I would also look into what cleaning preventatives you could do if you need to bring in new goaties and what not.

    I personally will not allow any animals onto the ranch without CAE, CL and Johnes testing. (Johnes is an added bonus - but the others are a must!) Reason being is I get mentally attached and there is money attached to what we do.

    I hope everything comes back negative for CAE - maybe run a CBC/Chem blood test and see if you might have some vitamin deficiency going on or mineral??
     
  6. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    going down in their knees is also a sign of foundering.

    CAE isnt and end all but it can be frustrating to deal with if the goats are showing signs and are your only breeding animals
     
  7. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I pray it isn't CAE .......... hope the results will say,,, negitive........... :pray:

    GOOD LUCK~!
     
  8. goatmama2

    goatmama2 New Member

    178
    Oct 20, 2007
    Upstate New York
    Thanks everyone; sorry I couldn't get back to y'all sooner. The vet called today and the tests were totally positive for CAE. I'm just sick. I'm lucky to have such a small herd at the moment, but our Daisy we've had for a long time and was our first ever baby, we have her daughter Sage and a new buckling we just bought in the spring. This disease must be spreadable because Lily is unrelated to any of the goats who had it before. However, she was bred to Thistle, who came from the same farm as the first goats who had it. Their breeder was lovely and wonderful, and I know she didn't realize anyone had CAE.
    Goathappy, I had the sample sent to Cornell University here in NY, they are totally about agriculture, animal husbandry, etc. and I'm pretty sure they're qualified to test. This is where all veterinary testing is done.
    I am going to visit the websites you all suggested, but I have to face facts that this disease will take our Lily and maybe Daisy and Sage as well. We will not breed her, but let her live as long as she isn't suffering...she's earned it. I won't be able to keep any of Daisy's kids, either, but will try to find them homes where people don't want to breed. I have to do what I can to keep this from continuing should I get new goats eventually. My heart is breaking!!! :cry:
     
  9. Sonrise Farm

    Sonrise Farm Guest

    Sep 18, 2008
    You poor thing :( what a nightmare. . . :hug:
     
  10. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    Oh hun - I am so sorry that this is happening. Have you contacted the people that you got your Daisie from? Was she there when your other goats were there with CAE?

    :hug: I am so sorry! :hug:
     
  11. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    that is devastating news.:tears: ...I am so sorry..............that has to be very hard on you......... :pray: :worried:
     
  12. goatmama2

    goatmama2 New Member

    178
    Oct 20, 2007
    Upstate New York
    Yes, it's tough. Our Daisy was born here. We got all of our original goats from the same person many years ago, including Daisy's mama, our buck, several others and the two that eventually were the first to come down with CAE. This woman stopped doing goats a few years ago when her husband died suddenly, so she's no longer farming.
    I need to find out now how to clean properly...my fear is that even if we do eventually have to get rid of our girls, the CAE will somehow linger in the barn. I'm worried now, too, that our new boy Cohosh may have gotten infected by breeding with Daisy. I've only had him a few months and he's only 7 months old. If anyone has any advice, I'll gladly take it!
    Thanks for all your good thoughts. It's nice to know we're not in this alone. Brooke
     
  13. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    from all I hear CAE is not transmitted through breeding in anyway :shrug:

    CAE isnt like CL that stays in the soil.
     
  14. goatmama2

    goatmama2 New Member

    178
    Oct 20, 2007
    Upstate New York
    Good to know, thanks Stacey. This is killing me because we are down to only 2 milk goats as it is, and I won't re-breed her because I don't think she could carry the weight. I'm also worried about the kids we've sold to other people over the years without knowing they may be carrying this.
     
  15. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I agree with stacey..............I have heard ....it is not transmitted in that manner.............


    If you have a doe that is positive and you also have a doe that is negitive........if they have babies and they are in the same field............ the kid from the negative doe ............nurses by chance or accident..............can get CAE.............. :(

    I've seen babies nurse off of different moms .............before they are caught........... :cry:
     
  16. FarmGirl18

    FarmGirl18 New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Oklahoma
    Stacey is right, CAE doesn't stay in the soil like CL does. CAE is definitely not fun to deal with, but it's not the end of the world either. You can still breed your girls, you will just have to pull the kids and bottle raise, and it's fine to drink the milk yourself...no worries there. And I think it's very unlikely for it to transmit through breeding...really only birthing fluids and milk. Sorry you are having to deal with this, but it sounds like you are dealing with it in the best way you can.
     
  17. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    I know of alot of people that keep seperate herds when CAE is discovered. And from what I have been told - you can still breed with a negative buck and the chances are VERY rare that anything would be transfered to the buck.... like one in a million.

    As far as the milk and what not - as long as it is pasturized I think that you can still consume it - but I am not positive - someone else might know more on that.

    And don't ever feel like you are alone - we are all a fmaily here! :grouphug:
     
  18. FarmGirl18

    FarmGirl18 New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Oklahoma
    As far as I know it's fine to drink the milk raw...unless you prefer to pasteurize.
     
  19. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    we drank raw milk for years from a CAE positive doe...........we are all alive :wink:
     
  20. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    So sorry you and your goaties are dealing with this. Do your best to research the disease, it helps alot when you know what you are dealing with and you may even find ways to relieve their pain so they have the best quality of life any well loved goatie could have :hug: