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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Howdy folks,

Got some shocking news on one of the email groups I'm on. A gal I had taken two does to in 2011 for breeding (they only stayed for a month) had had issues with one of her older girls (just that one). When she finally lost her, she had her necropsied and the doe was diagnosed with scrapies. So the USDA is coming in to sweep her property and eradicate the herd, which is horribly tragic because I know how much she loved her goats. I recall she had some sheep out in the pasture with them and I wonder if maybe it had come from them? Don't know.

She said she would have told me if I had anything to worry about, and the USDA would have been in touch with me if they thought it was a hazard, but I'm still left to wonder if I'm alright on those does; I sold them shortly after because I wanted to take the herd in a new direction, and I didn't retain the kids. Everyone was healthy and went to great little homes, but Lord knows where they are now.

From what I have been researching, transmission is mainly via ewe-to-lamb/doe-to-kid via birthing fluids/blood/milk, and then (obviously) the soil. It's been theorized that urine might contain prions, but it hasn't been found in seminal fluid and so bucks are thought to not be able to transmit it. It's a slow-moving thing, 2-4 years after exposure to crop up.

Could go for putting my mind at ease here; the buck pen the girls went into was very, very clean, everyone looked great. I have had no signs of illness in the herd. But it has been two years. What do you all think? I want to say I don't have much to worry about, but I'm a worrywart at heart...
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Found resolution on my own with some more convo with the gal (bless her) - so posting here for anyone looking/wondering!

The USDA was not concerned about the stud service; she never put the bucks out to pasture or on the same ground as the rest of the herd, the breeding pens were separate, were never on the same soil as the does/kids, and breeding is considered really low risk; it's not considered a route of transmission. And so they never even asked her about the visiting does. Whew!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Me too on both accounts; she's such a sweet lady and she really loves her animals. I had wondered if she'd find trouble with the sheep she had, though :( I still wonder if they were the source of the scrapies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
From what I had been reading, it almost sounded like goats aren't as prone to the disease as sheep are. So far, all research for making a live test for the disease is even geared towards sheep specifically.

Sheep certainly do seem to have a lot going against them =/
 
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