The Goat Spot Forum banner

1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have been raising and breeding goats for a number of years now. We have mostly Saanens and local Ecuadorian mutt goats crossed with Saanen.

We have noticed that bucks with split scrotums seem to make does with long, pendulous udders. Our purebred Saanen bucks both have no split whatsoever in their sacks and all their daughters have round udders, decent attachment and smaller teats.

Is this coincidence? Has anyone else noticed this? I have a very handsome Snubian buckling right now who has a slight split and I'm wondering if that will have any bearing on his future daughters' udders.

The photos aren't my goats, just for illustrative purposes.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,990 Posts
Interesting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
yes, split scrodums do cause udder problems, in the US splits are a major disqualification in shows
Does the degree of the split correlate with the badness of the udder? We don't raise show goats so we're not looking for perfect conformation, but we also don't want teats that are so long and large that babies can't nurse from them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here in Ecuador people hold many strange beliefs about how to select a good milk goat. One of the most common things we hear is that you should look for very long ears. Another we have heard is to look for the split scrotum on bucks and very long teats on does. When we got our first saanens our biggest concern was how they would adjust to the warm, sunny weather. Our neighbors told us we had made a mistake buying them because... their ears were so small!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,120 Posts
I have never before seen a scrotum like that. Is it bound to certain breeds?

If the Ecuadorian beliefe is that a goat with long teats milk better, of course the phenomenon will occur more in that country.

Here, the traditional "milk signs" are bells, big veins in front of the udder - and polledness! But most people, when buying a milk goat, ask for the year production of both mother and grandmothers, as well as, when available, the individual's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have never before seen a scrotum like that. Is it bound to certain breeds?

If the Ecuadorian beliefe is that a goat with long teats milk better, of course the phenomenon will occur more in that country.

Here, the traditional "milk signs" are bells, big veins in front of the udder - and polledness! But most people, when buying a milk goat, ask for the year production of both mother and grandmothers, as well as, when available, the individual's.
interesting! I see youtube videos of goats in Brasil and various African countries and I see that long teats and split scrotums are common there, too.

purebred dogs have become very common here in the last 5-10 years, even in the countryside. So I can hope that maybe better goat genetics are on the way?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,590 Posts
long ears do help with heat dispersion, thats all, a long eard goat will do much better in hot arid climates than a short eard goat, all Alpine breeds have short ears, I am not very familiar with why the LaMancha has such tiny ears I do know they where created in the US. here, the best milkers have round, well fitted, tight, high udders (they can be as big as a melon, but still tight to the doe, kind of like my LaMancha doe, she is by no means perfect, but a good visual, here she was producing 1 1/2 gallons a day)
unnamed (15).jpg
unnamed (17).jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,120 Posts
interesting! I see youtube videos of goats in Brasil and various African countries and I see that long teats and split scrotums are common there, too.

purebred dogs have become very common here in the last 5-10 years, even in the countryside. So I can hope that maybe better goat genetics are on the way?
Yes, indeed very interesting! Here, maybe people traditionally were used to hand milking, and refused to buy a goat with unmanageable teats?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
931 Posts
@spidy1 that is a lovely udder!!

@Trollmor I remember but ex's does, some of the Nubians had the long pendulous teats and they were like leather. In his mind they were excellent milking does. One of the does had a scar on her teat from when it got snagged on something out in the paddock :( very sad. These were my first experiences with goats so I wasn't too freaked out. now had I see those does for the first time I would have scolded him and told him to just retire those does to being pasture buddies to live out their days or sell for meat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
long ears do help with heat dispersion, thats all, a long eard goat will do much better in hot arid climates than a short eard goat, all Alpine breeds have short ears, I am not very familiar with why the LaMancha has such tiny ears I do know they where created in the US. here, the best milkers have round, well fitted, tight, high udders (they can be as big as a melon, but still tight to the doe, kind of like my LaMancha doe, she is by no means perfect, but a good visual, here she was producing 1 1/2 gallons a day) View attachment 149847 View attachment 149849
I never thought about the ears, I'd always heard that horns help with heat dispersion. Around here there are no udders as nice as that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
@spidy1 that is a lovely udder!!

@Trollmor I remember but ex's does, some of the Nubians had the long pendulous teats and they were like leather. In his mind they were excellent milking does. One of the does had a scar on her teat from when it got snagged on something out in the paddock :( very sad. These were my first experiences with goats so I wasn't too freaked out. now had I see those does for the first time I would have scolded him and told him to just retire those does to being pasture buddies to live out their days or sell for meat.
If all the goats with pendulous teats were culled here, there would be almost no goats left. Udder injuries are very common. Most goats here are raised for meat... even though they are not very meaty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
That is very interesting. I just discovered my 3 week old doe has four teats. From what I am reading that’s a bad quality (at least I think that’s what I’m finding) and that she will probably have teats that don’t function. Maybe confusing her babies one day? I don’t show my goats so it’s no biggie but very interesting. Her mom has a nipple that has a double barrel so I guess it’s in her genes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Four teats... so that would be from a buck that has 4 testes, right? haha. Many goats here have extra teats, or teats with two orifices. I've heard you can snip extra ones off when they are very small. I assume you use a numbing agent of some kind?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
931 Posts
That is very interesting. I just discovered my 3 week old doe has four teats. From what I am reading that's a bad quality (at least I think that's what I'm finding) and that she will probably have teats that don't function. Maybe confusing her babies one day? I don't show my goats so it's no biggie but very interesting. Her mom has a nipple that has a double barrel so I guess it's in her genes
So from what I have read if the doe and doeling are meat bred and not dair it is not as important that the teat structure is perfect. They have diamgrams of what is acceptable for boers for sure. I used to have a couple Boer does and none of them had just 2 teats, it was bizarre.

I don't think snipping them off is a good idea, I cringed just now thinking about it. Thekids usually figure out what teats give them milk pretty fast.
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top