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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our herd gets 2c each per day alfalfa pellets (spread out to 2 feedings) and free access to orchard hay and a mix of local grasses. Also free access to Redmond Salt, Redmond salt blocks and Sweetlix Meat market minerals.

Lilly is the lowest in the social order, always a little bit under where I want her to be in terms of body condition and FAMACHA and the first to get clumpy poos. My partner told me this morning that she hasn’t been finishing her alfalfa pellets. Like, of the 2 cups she gets throughout the day (am feeding of .5c, pm feeding of 1.5c) she is nibbling at it and only eating half (partner is measuring what she is leaving) and instead eat hay.

I’m wondering if this sounds like off her feed, or if she just doesn’t need all that extra protein. One of the doelings didn’t finish her breakfast the other day either, but that was the day I but herbal worming tea in it and they all seem to prefer that I don’t do that, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Oh, I forgot to say: there are no other signs that she is “off”. She is, in general, the Eeyore of the bunch and often alone and kind of depressed looking, so she’s doing her normal mopey thing.
 

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I'm not sure what size animal this is, but finishing two cups of alfalfa pellets in a day should be no problem for most goats. Has she always found them unpalatable? I definitely have some goats that like them much less than others. She may feel too threatened in the current eating area to take the time to finish. Is she flinching when other goats rustle around? Nervous that one will hit her away from her dish?

It may boost her confidence to give her a designated feeding spot - often jumping up on a short platform away from the others can help them feel comfortable that they can't be hit hard.

But ultimately, if you want your herd to be productive or if they are not pets only, then these are not the temperament you want to breed & populate the herd yet. Timid does often raised timid young that will also not thrive in the tough herd setting.

Providing more placing for her to hide under/jump on or even just a couple short walls in the loafing area can make them feel more comfortable. I began using two steel t-posts driven in to the gravel barn floor with a wood pallet slid over to provide a visual and physical barrier against bullying.
 

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Get a temp on her first, before doing anything. If normal or sub temp, build her rumen, with fortified vit B complex SQ 6 cc's per 100 lbs for 3 days minimum, and probiotic paste. Both, 1 x a day.

If it is high, she most likely is beginning pneumonia start antibiotics. Normal temp is 101.5 to 103.5.
Make sure she hasn't been running or in direct sun, before taking her temp. It can make it a bit higher than normal

If she is smaller than everyone, make a creep feeder for her, so she can go to it anytime without being pushed off.

If she is anemic, she most likely has worms, cocci, lice or mites or a combination of.
A fecal will let you know. Then treat her, for anything it may show.
Look her over well, for parasites.

If she is really anemic, white or pale pink, give horse red cell.
6 cc's per 100 lbs daily for 1 week, then 1 x a week thereafter.
Check her color daily, in the evening is best, if at any time, her color goes to borderline famancha safe color, stop at that time.
 

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I agree with doing an allover check up. Being normally mopey may hide things when she doesn't feel well since you are used to her looking sad. Better to rule things out just in case.
I but herbal worming tea in it and they all seem to prefer that I don't do that,
With herbs you really need to be sure they are getting their portion or things may not be addressed.
 
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