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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is my Boer doe (Annie) who is almost 9 months old. This is my first Boer so I have no idea how to set her up! :eek: She is very fussy and stubborn and spends the whole time trying to scruntch her body up and keep her head down while I am setting her up. I am working with her every day and she is getting a little better :) I have some pictures of her so I can get some suggestions and tips on what to do with her, and how to get her to relax.
Also, as a percentage, does she have enough pigmentation?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Here is one where she is not set up and she is relaxed-ish.
 

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If you just bought her she is new to your farm.. My goats act like that for about 1 week then finally feel relaxed.. Spend time with the goat...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
She has been here for 3-4 weeks.. She is definitely relaxed around us and the goats.
 

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Even though its frowned upon to pet them while setting them up, try it anyway.
Here's what I would do:
Take her out if the pen, and just pet her and play with her for a while. After 5-10 minutes, try to set her up. If she puts her head down, tap your finger on her chin to get her to put her head up. If she doesn't, push it up with some force with your hand. If she's still not relaxed, feed her some grain or treats while she is set up. She should relax a little while eating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have tried petting her, taping her chin, and pushing her chin. Being forceful with her head makes her tense up more and scrunch up more. It has the oposite effect you would think it would have, lol. I will try setting her up while she gets her grain, though.
 

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Yep, definitely try the grain. Don't worry about her head first and just worry about her relaxing. Another method you could try is firmly but gently "smoothing" her muscles out. Not sure how well this will work but worth a try. Once you start getting her to relax, try moving her head where it needs to be and hold it there for a minute or two.
 

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Do you work with her by herself? Is so, does that seem to be an issue for her? If your not working her with another goat, see if someone can just walk another goat in front of her, stop the goat in front of her while you teach her to set up, etc.
We've got one that was like that when my daughter showed her last year, oh my...she was sooooo stubborn!
Now that she isn't shown anymore, she walks much better on a lead, and I bet we could even get her to set up lol

Sadly, some goats are much more stubborn than others.

Good Luck! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Do you work with her by herself? Is so, does that seem to be an issue for her? If your not working her with another goat, see if someone can just walk another goat in front of her, stop the goat in front of her while you teach her to set up, etc.
We've got one that was like that when my daughter showed her last year, oh my...she was sooooo stubborn!
Now that she isn't shown anymore, she walks much better on a lead, and I bet we could even get her to set up lol

Sadly, some goats are much more stubborn than others.

Good Luck! :)
I work with her while she is in the pen with the other goats. I haven't tried working with her out of the pen.. I'll have to give that a try.
 

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Definitely try getting her out of the own to work with her. This way she's away from the hustle and bustle of the other goats, not worrying about getting run into and such.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well I got her to start relaxing and to start stoping fighting the lead/collar! :) I went into the barn and dug up the show chain.. Figured that would help get her attention a little more than the nylon barn collar. Also, I found that if I gently cup her nose with my hand a push back a little tiny bit, she'll get her head up and look all pretty :) And this was in the pen. Tomorrow when I work with her I will take her out of the pen. Her worst problem now is fighting with the lead while I am walking her. She wants to look at me the whole time. But I have until the begging of June before her first show, so I have plenty of time. I will work with her for a few more days and get some set up pictures of her this weekend. Any tips on how to set her up?
 

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That's great! I have a stubborn one too... Since I take her to the fair unfortunately I have to walk her *ehem, drag her* through the ring. She is a stubborn little girl, but every time I get super mad at her she turns her puppy dog eyes to me and apologizes with her eyes and I melt and end up saying I'm sorry about a hundred times...

I'm thinking next year I'm going to put treats in my pocket before showing her and the boys... Just a thought :)
 

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As far as setting up, you have her a little too dairy like. Her back legs should be squared up a good bit and not so wide set. Try setting them at her pin width.

I would work on her relaxing too. Just put the collar on her and chill with her some. Maybe not so much seriousness. Then once she's used to it and not tensing start working on setting up and all that.
 

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And yes she does have enough pigments. Shes whag is called violet pigment which means she just doesn't have really dark pigment but it still counts in the ring.
 

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Do you have a clipping stand with a head catch? If so, this is the easiest way to start training...

Put goat on stand with head in head catch set at the right height to keep head and neck at 45 degree angles. Touch her all over. Handle her top and leg as a judge would. Rub her legs all the way down to her hooves until she's comfortable and doesn't move. Lift her feet, one at a time and place so that all 4 are square out her corners...straight down from her shoulders and down and slightly back from her rump. The 2nd pic you posted is about right, but rear legs are too far apart. The 4th pic, I think it's the 4th, she is too stretched...back legs need to come forward and closer together from rear view.

Once she is comfortable with all this...may take a few lessons...continue to next step.

Put her back on the stand with a collar on. Stand on stand with her holding collar as of she were being shown. Her head should still be in head catch with head and neck at 45 degree angle. Keep a little pressure on the collar the whole time you're working with her. Move so that both of your feet are under her belly. Lean down and set her back feet as previously described. Step back to her shoulder and set her front feet. Stand, keeping slight pressure on collar for a short time and then release pressure and pet her. Repeat several times adding a little more time until she'll stand still for several minutes.

Once she is solid with showing on the stand, try it on the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I do not have a fitting stand.. Just a milk stanchion. Maybe I can get a fitting stand for christmas :) Either that, or a goat. LOL! I will get some new pictures of her set up this weekend. Today she did SOOO well compared to previous 'lessons'. I am hoping that with a few more days training (I work with them at least once a day, sometimes twice) she will be ready to pose for at least pictures... She is good with getting her feet and legs touched, just when it is time to lead or get her head up, she FIGHTS! Using the show chain really helped. She looks MUCH nicer today when I set her up then she does in these pictures :)
 
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