Shivering Goats

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by turtlebutte goats, Dec 25, 2009.

  1. turtlebutte goats

    turtlebutte goats New Member

    99
    Nov 22, 2008
    Merry Christmas everyone!
    I am in SD, and we are in a really bad storm. There is about 15" of snow on the ground with about 12" more to come in the next 24 hours. It is about 0 degrees out with about -50 to -60 windchill. I just got in from checking the goaties. They are in a garden shed which is lined on the inside with small hay bales. It is a wood floor with about 4" of hay on the floor. The door faces the south and the wind is out of the north. I have piled more hay on the floor in the corner by the door which is out of the way if the wind blows snow in the door. The problem is the goats prefer to lay on and under a table I have next to the other side of the door where the snow is blowing in. The stupid goats could go on the other side of the door where the hay is piled up to get cozy, however they have chosen to lay near the door where the wind and snow is blowing in. They were shivering pretty good. Should I be worried since they are shivering or just not worry about it since they could snuzzle down in the hay in another part of the shed?
     
  2. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Merry Christmas to you to.... :greengrin:

    Goats are strange sometimes... :roll: .. if they are eating ...drinking...acting normal..they should be OK.....for now shivering is a way ...for the body to generate heat.... but with Drafts... it isn't .. good on them.....Is there any way... to close them in...block the door way... while the wind is blowing on them like that ?
    There is that possibility... that they may get sick... from the big draft blowing on them..... :hug:
     

  3. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    can you build up the door area with hay or hay bales to block some of the snow and wind?

    shivering isnt always bad as Pam already said but if they get wet and the wind continues it could cause upper respiratory issues
     
  4. turtlebutte goats

    turtlebutte goats New Member

    99
    Nov 22, 2008
    It just seems weird to me that they would choose to lay in their shed where the draft is and not on the other side of the building where it isnt drafty. I thought about closing the door, but have read where they need the fresh air. If I close the door, I am concerned they could not get enough fresh air. Should I just close the door but leave it open 2-3"?
     
  5. pennylullabelle

    pennylullabelle New Member

    Closing it enough to prevent major drafts just during the storm should be fine. Open it back up when the wind and snow lets up. Could you move the table they live to the other side?
     
  6. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    goats like to stay where they are use to being even if its uncomfortable -- stupid I know

    yes close them in when its cold and windy but dont keep them close in for life ;)

    once the storm is over and the wind dies down you can open it back up again
     
  7. turtlebutte goats

    turtlebutte goats New Member

    99
    Nov 22, 2008
    Thank you everyone for the responses. Before I read the last ones, I ventured out to see how all the chickens, sheep, mules and goats were doing, and the goats were all huddled underneath their table (like Stacy said) where they are always at. I got some of the snow out from underneath the table, put fresh hay down and shut the door most of the way. They seemed content except for the fainter buck who is never happy!
    The sheep are all running around in the snow, just as happy as they can be. They have a shed but of course refuse to go into it. The black faces all look like the white faces now, covered in snow.

    Thanks again for the responses. For people that are not as experienced with animals such as myself, this website helps so much. Thank you Stacy for creating this. I truly appreciate all of everyones hard work in keeping this site going.
    Brian
     
  8. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    very happy to be of service
     
  9. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    You are very welcome.....we are always happy to help..... :hug: :greengrin: :wink:
     
  10. Saddlebum

    Saddlebum New Member

    52
    Dec 24, 2009
    Michigan
    I'm a newbie here to this board. One thing I would like to mention is hay is not a very good conductor of heat. Actually, I understand it to be very poor. The best thing is straw, wheat or rye. Straw has hollow shafts and is wonderful insulator and great for warmth.