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These are the best pictures I could find. Our milking station is pretty basic, it is right next to our goats loafing area. We have 2 stands butted up next to one another, I like the rail on the yellow stand, it provides a good place to brace the goat, especially if they're squirmy. We put an old folding table in front of the milking stands and it's a dirt floor underneath. We have running water in the barn and electricity which makes milking a lot easier.

I have dreams of pouring concrete with drainage in one of our stalls with a sink, a fridge, wipeable walls and cabinets to organize my goat pharmacy/ supplies. Oh and bright lights so I can see better...a girl can dream right??
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Here is my milk room. I will pour concrete, and put a shelf in. I can't wait for it to be finished!!!
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This is the view of the goat pen from the milk room, a little far away, but not too bad
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cristina-sorina, I just LOVE that photo of the suckling kid! What a style!!! But I would prefer the goats to be separated by a standing place for the milker, not forcing you to walk all the way around to start milking the next goat! If you have an assistant (child???), that person will have just about enough time to shift goats on one stand while you milk the goat on the other stand. If I can add to your dream, it would be a nice shelf for straining the milk after each goat, and another UNDER the stands, for the milk pot, to prevent hoofs into it ...

nigerian dwarf goat, I wonder how you use your stand? Are you sitting or standing when milking? How does the goat get up? If she jumps by the yellow bucket, and then you sit down on it, your clothes will get dirty when bad weather ...

I am impressed by the "crossword", and by the clock, and I wonder how you prevent the hens from messing on your coming milk shelf?
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I wonder how you use your stand? Are you sitting or standing when milking? How does the goat get up? If she jumps by the yellow bucket, and then you sit down on it, your clothes will get dirty when bad weather ...

I have a little stool I sit on when I am milking. My goats just jump up on the stand, and since i have small goats, if they cant get up themselves, then I will lift them up. The yellow bucket is what I bring all my stuff out there with like the baby wipes, the bucket, etc

I am impressed by the "crossword", and by the clock, and I wonder how you prevent the hens from messing on your coming milk shelf?
When I am milking the hens are cooped up, and they cant get in unless I open the gate, so they got in when I went in to get pictures. @Trollmor I dont know what you mean by "crossword"
 

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I meant the stones in the treat bucket. Anything that will cause the goat to get concentrated on searching for the goodies will do as a "crossword"!

But I am still puzzled. Are you sitting close to the goat you are milking? You can not possibly stand up!
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
nigerian dwarf goat, I wonder how you use your stand? Are you sitting or standing when milking? How does the goat get up? If she jumps by the yellow bucket, and then you sit down on it, your clothes will get dirty when bad weather ...
I have a little stool I sit on when I am milking. The goats just jump up on the milk stand themselves, and since my goats are little if they cant get up on the stand, I will just lift them up.

I am impressed by the "crossword", and by the clock, and I wonder how you prevent the hens from messing on your coming milk shelf?
The chickens usually dont go into the milk room unless I open the gate, and when I go out to milk, the chickens are eating their scratch or are in the compost pile behind the barn and usually dont try to bother me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Are you sitting close to the goat you are milking? You can not possibly stand up!
Yes, I have a little stool that I sit on when I milk, but it was in the garden because i was pulling weeds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Also as yall can see the little deer blind that I call the goat shed has a pallet with hay & alfalfa on it, 3 storage bins for feed and minerals, and a big box filled with goat stuff. It is very crammed in there and i would like to move some of the stuff into he milk room
 

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cristina-sorina, I just LOVE that photo of the suckling kid! What a style!!! But I would prefer the goats to be separated by a standing place for the milker, not forcing you to walk all the way around to start milking the next goat! If you have an assistant (child???), that person will have just about enough time to shift goats on one stand while you milk the goat on the other stand. If I can add to your dream, it would be a nice shelf for straining the milk after each goat, and another UNDER the stands, for the milk pot, to prevent hoofs into it
We actually don't milk from the side, we milk our goats from behind so I don't have to go all the way around. Sometimes if they misbehave on the stand I will sit on the side of the stand and sort of pin them up to the rail so they can't dance around as much.
I like your addition to my dream! That's an interesting idea to have a way to milk into a pot under the stand so thy can't get their hooves into it.
 

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Nice you like my addition, which I tried out for many years. Very rarely, a piece of dirt could land in the milk there underneath, and once actually a hoof (followed by the whole goat!!!), but most of the times even a dancing goat failed to put any much dirt into the milk. (Sometimes milk all over me and the rest of the room, though ...)

(I fail to understand how you reach the udders from behind on the yellow stand.)

Goat psychology, for those of you who are at the planning stage: Goats prefer to be milked from the side. Look at how they do when they feed their young! They check the kids' ID by sniffing on their butts, (which in its turn stimulates the youngsters to suck more intensive). If a human milks, the goat will also occasionally check ID by sniffing, which many of you no doubt have felt.

When you have filled your pot, you will gladly just turn around to fill the strainer, and then turn again to milk the next goat.

Be careful to have a good working position! Ergonomy!
 

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(I fail to understand how you reach the udders from behind on the yellow stand)

Be careful to have a good working position! Ergonomy!
This is the best picture in could find if hubby milking. We sit on the back of the milk stand and put the pail right behind them, it actually keeps a lot of the belly hair from falling in. My brother in law who kept over 300 sheep in Romania and milked them twice a day to sell the milk and cheese always milked his sheep like that. I originally started milking on the side but decided to give his milking style a try and found it works so much better for me ergonomically speaking, plus I end up with cleaner milk. The goats have all gotten used to being milked from behind and do very well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I made some changes yesterday!! Also, instead of me pouring in concrete, I think I am going to use that money for a sink and a mini fridge! Since so many of y'all have dirt floors, I figured I could go without it and go with some other things that will make my milking much easier!

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
@cristina-sorina Aha, you sit on the stand! Never occurred to me! This shows that also an old Troll can still learn new things! :)

@Nigerian dwarf goat Beautiful shelf! I think you did the right thing! Also a concrete floor must be washed and brushed, so it is not so much more daily work to rake a dirt floor!
That is the thing. If i get a concrete floor, then i will have to get a pressure washer, and that is about 600 more dollars. Pouring concrete would probably cost me 5$ a square foot my milk room is about 20 x 10 so that will cost me another 1,000$. All in all, i think it would be better for me to keep a dirt floor and use the rest of the money to make improvements to my herd and to my other animals on my farm.
 

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That is the thing. If i get a concrete floor, then i will have to get a pressure washer, and that is about 600 more dollars.
My family used a special hose and nozzle, it attached right to a regular spigot. I don't know how much it cost, but it couldn't have been that much cause my dad does NOT spend extra money and he already had a pressure washer at the time. I do understand about the dirt floor though. It's cheaper and more easily maintained.
 

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Here's my super-not-fancy-but-upgraded milk space. It went from the dirtiest building on the farm to our attached garage (that we never park in). It's clean (enough), bright, social (kids help more now), my does are more compliant, and the person sized door leads to the kitchen- super handy. It's also near the hose and we moved feed that we soak each day into the garage too. Loving it!
 

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Depending on the weather I milk under a metal shed outside (cover) adjacent to the goat building/feed room or inside the building. Warm weather milking is done outside in the open and during cold winter weather milking is done inside the building.I can tell you that the goats prefer the outside stands over going inside unless it is cold or raining. I have shelving inside that holds all the wipes, creams or what ever is needed. Outside I just carry out the necessary items usually wipes and fightback spray. I use metal milking stands with head locks. The flooring on the stands are expended metal which allows the goats good footing and actually cleans some of the dirt from the hooves making trimming the hooves a little easier. The building is made of wood in the fashion of a normal house structure with a porch on the front to allow the goats to get onto before entering through the door. The Building has electricity for lights and other needs. Plans are to put in a small refrigerator soon for milk and other items needing refrigeration.
 
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