silly ? about worming

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by cdtrum, Jun 15, 2009.

  1. cdtrum

    cdtrum New Member

    Aug 25, 2008
    Northern Indiana
    Can worming cause eyelids to go pale the day of worming :shrug: ? I wormed all 4 boys today in case of lungworms, 3 boys coughing. Jake eyelids now look pale after worming this morning.
     
  2. ksacres

    ksacres New Member

    161
    Oct 30, 2007
    San Antonio Texas
    Heavy worm infestations can cause blood loss after worming as the parasites loose their grip-then you have some bleed outs. But that's about the only thing I can think of that's related to worming that would cause them to pale.
     

  3. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    I've never heard of that, but the above post sounds like a definate posibility....hmmmm, not sure, i'm sure someone will respond soon w/ good info. :wink:
     
  4. Thanatos

    Thanatos New Member

    937
    Mar 16, 2009
    Lake Ariel, Pa
    there was a wormer, i cant remember which one, that if given orally and the load of worms was very high it caused the animal to bleed internally. I want to say it was invermectin, but i cant remember. but your boys are all young right?
     
  5. cdtrum

    cdtrum New Member

    Aug 25, 2008
    Northern Indiana
    Yes, Jason they are young.....two are right at a year, the other two are 4mths......what does their age have to do with it? ......and I did us Ivomec, which is ivermectin to cover lungworms......my 2 little guys have been coughing for over a month now and one older one started this weekend so wormed them for lungworms to cover my basis......two little guys did have shipping fever a month ago so don't know if cough is from that or worms.....very frustrated!
     
  6. Thanatos

    Thanatos New Member

    937
    Mar 16, 2009
    Lake Ariel, Pa
    I ask age cause its less likley to be a worm overload with very young kids as they dont have time to build it, but I was thinking like 4-6 months old young. I am hunting for the article where I read the wormer thing when I find it I will get it in here.
     
  7. Thanatos

    Thanatos New Member

    937
    Mar 16, 2009
    Lake Ariel, Pa
    Found it!!!!

    http://goat-link.com/content/view/58/46/

    It DOES NOT specify a specific medication it just says not to give an injectable orally to an overloaded goat.

    Warning the pic on there is mabey a bit graphic.
     
  8. cdtrum

    cdtrum New Member

    Aug 25, 2008
    Northern Indiana
    Thanks Jason for the article.....I have always read to give the injectable orally, so that is what I did. I have been out in the yard with them for a bit and they are fine...Jakes coloring is looking better tonight.....How do you know if a goat is overloaded, but no eggs show on fecal? I know they can have worms but the worms aren't laying......quite confusing. I just did fecals on them all and they showed no eggs, but really thought I'd be better to treat for lung worms because of such bad cough.
     
  9. RunAround

    RunAround New Member

    Feb 17, 2008
    Massachusetts
    I personally do not like the famancha method and don't go by it since i've had goats with very pale lids come back with normal blood counts.

    If I had to guess I would say he got cold and the body kept most of his blood in his inner organs to preserve body heat. When you checked again he was warm so his body was not be keeping the blood in.

    It's fine that you treated with ivomec orally. I do all the time. And the cough is a sign of lung worms so i probably would have wormed them too.
     
  10. cdtrum

    cdtrum New Member

    Aug 25, 2008
    Northern Indiana
    Thanks RunAround......I took the Famacha class last week and I just don't know about it either.....they even said in the class that pale eyelids can be from other than just barber-pole worms, which is the only worm the Famacha is really for. My 2 older guys have never had as red of membranes as the chart shows they should have and Jake and Elwood have been so healthy since getting them almost a year ago. It's my new little guys that are causing me the pain in my rump.....Now if I can just get them healthy!
     
  11. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    you cant expect them to be suddenly healthy. After being sick it is a process for theiir bodies to heal.
     
  12. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    After all they've been through they could possibly have vitamin A deficiency--it is not unusual in kids that have/had cocci due to decreased absorpbtion because the intestinal walls get irritated. Vitamin A deficiency can cause respiratory problems (such as coughing and nasal discharge), susceptibility to parasites, and rough skin/coat (I think you mentioned one of your little guys had hair/skin problems).

    If the cough doesn't begin to clear up after a couple rounds of ivomec, you may want to consider supplementing with vitamin A for a while and see if that helps.

    I once had a young doeling with a chronic cough that I could not get rid of. I was sure it was lung worm but no amount of any kind of wormer cleared it up. A local breeder told me exactly what I typed up above and within a couple weeks of supplementing, the cough was gone.
     
  13. cdtrum

    cdtrum New Member

    Aug 25, 2008
    Northern Indiana
    Thanks FunnyRiver.....how do you supplement Vit A? Can I just give them human Vit A or is there a livestock supplement?
    Thanks for the info, Denise
     
  14. Cinder

    Cinder New Member

    736
    Mar 2, 2008
    I've been following this thread as I have one Nigi that has had a dry, hacking cough for several weeks now. I've wormed with Ivermec and will do so again this week.

    I also would like more info on giving Vit. A.
     
  15. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    You use human vitamin A suplements although they do make an injectable for livestock. I gave 25,000 I.U. per day until I noticed great improvment (2 or 3 weeks or so) and then droped down to 10,000 I.U. per day for another couple weeks.

    You should not give the high 25,000 I.U. dose for more than a month since vit. A is fat soluble and accumulates in the body.

    I gave this to a full-sized dairy goat kid so for smaller breeds you may want to start out with 10,000-15,000 I.U. instead and see how they respond.

    For full grown adult goats you could probably triple or quadruple the amount I gave. It's very difficult to o.d. goats on Vit. A unless you give a very high dose over a long period of time.
     
  16. cdtrum

    cdtrum New Member

    Aug 25, 2008
    Northern Indiana
    Thanks sooooo much for the info FunnyRiver, I will get some Vit. A tomorrow!
     
  17. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    No problem :)

    It should also help to get them out browsing as much as possible--fresh, green plants are high in beta carotene, which is converted to vitamin A by the liver.

    If you don't see an improvement after a month, than you are likely dealing with something else...sometimes goats can drive us crazy! :hair: