Silly Chicken Question

Discussion in 'Other Pets' started by tracyqh, Nov 10, 2010.

  1. tracyqh

    tracyqh New Member

    394
    Aug 9, 2010
    Ohio
    I'm new to chickens. Hatched some on 7/6/10 (Delawares) and now they are big, fluffy, eating a ton and laying NO eggs. Granted, they just hit the 4 month old mark and they time change has set in. I noticed the roosters hoping on the hens lately. Now I know you don't have to have a rooster to make eggs :greengrin: , but could this be a sign that everyone is getting old enough to start laying? :chin:
     
  2. GoldenSeal

    GoldenSeal New Member

    298
    Sep 13, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    They usually don't start laying until at least 6 months.
     

  3. tracyqh

    tracyqh New Member

    394
    Aug 9, 2010
    Ohio
    crap. we are anxious for eggs....
     
  4. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Yep.... need to be a little older... but ...when it is time....give them some egg layer to help get them started... :wink: :thumb:
     
  5. tracyqh

    tracyqh New Member

    394
    Aug 9, 2010
    Ohio
  6. MissMM

    MissMM New Member

    645
    Oct 22, 2007
    McGregor, MN
    I wouldn't expect to start seeing eggs until they are at least 18 weeks old. Then you'll start seeing midget eggs, goofy-shaped eggs, but that will level off by 6 months old.

    IMHO, I would cull the roosters. They are not needed to 'create' eggs. They are just feed-burning noisy poo monsters. Although after saying that, I've kept the most beautiful roo but keep him out of the pen. He's our 'guard roo.'
     
  7. tracyqh

    tracyqh New Member

    394
    Aug 9, 2010
    Ohio
    I'm culling them as soon as they are big enough to EAT! (when will that be?) I have a pretty one, but they are getting to be pains. I have a banty "Watch Dog" Rooster. Nothin' get past him. He struts around like he's holding a gernade and is not afraid to use it!
     
  8. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    You'll want to "take care" of the roosters soon...anytime from now - 6 months of age. If you wait longer than 6 mo you'll risk having very tough meat...so sooner is better!
     
  9. tracyqh

    tracyqh New Member

    394
    Aug 9, 2010
    Ohio
    I'm making arrangements now.... :thumb:
     
  10. NubianLover

    NubianLover New Member

    784
    Sep 19, 2010
    Nebraska
    I just sold off 12 chickens that were just starting to lay "regular" shaped eggs.... they were April babies, sold a month ago. First couple weeks (as MissMM said) they may lay odd shaped, tiny eggs.
    I agree with culling the roosters. We kept our 1 americana rooster for about a year. Not only was he LOUD, but he was MEAN. He attacked me everytime I looked at him. They have "spurs" on backs of their feet and he was not afraid to use them! Ended up selling him to a breeder as she was looking for an americana.
    One other note, since winter is coming you may want to keep a lamp on them or they may not lay through the winter on a regular basis. Mine have a lamp on them nearly all the time, so they do continue to lay all year long. Only problem I have run into is if you don't get out there soon enough the eggs will freeze and crack!
     
  11. HAha around here we call thier first eggs fart eggs! lol they should be laying by 20 wks it is the time of year production is slower also, unless you use a light. I guess depending on where you live? You'll want to give them a good layer pellet or crumble. That will help start good healthy egg production.
    Are your girls free range? They don't need as much if they are. I unfortunatly have to keep mine in a run(STUPID dog), and various other critters. Anyhow, hope you get eggs soon!
     
  12. tracyqh

    tracyqh New Member

    394
    Aug 9, 2010
    Ohio
    We are keeping a light on them and I'm hoping the guy can get my roosters ASAP! I WANT EGGS!!!!! :greengrin:
     
  13. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    Make sure that you are only giving a total of 12-14 hours of white light. If you want a light on through the night - that one needs to be a red bulb. If you use white light 24 hours a day - they will not lay.
     
  14. tracyqh

    tracyqh New Member

    394
    Aug 9, 2010
    Ohio
    Thanks for that. I was using a white light. I'll put the red in tonight. My girls will be living in the "red light district". :ROFL: My, what will the neighbors think when they see the red glow from the coop?
     
  15. You can put your light on a timer, they are pretty cheap. And then you can time it to come on in the morning a few hours before dawn. You don't want it to shut off suddenly at night, cause then you catch them off the roost and they can get all confused. But then you wouldn't have to run a light all the time :wink: Saves on the electric bill that way.
     
  16. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Those timers work great! I had to use a dusk to dawn night light for my doeling back in January and February, it really saved me from worrying about being home to turn on her light when I went away. You can get them pretty cheap this time of year too...people use them to run their Christmas lights. Get 2...one for the white light to turn on and off and one for the red light so you aren't worrying about confusing your chickens when the white light goes out.
     
  17. animallover

    animallover New Member

    44
    Jun 20, 2010
    Redding,CA
    with my roosters I make them scared of me. I run at them,so them don't turn into mean ones.