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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After so many wonderful stories from Nanno and kidding news from Dave I am going through withdrawals it's been so quiet sitting here around the campfire!
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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You just hush! :) The flood gates will open in the next week or so :) We still have at least 20 more to kid! But instead of enjoying this slight break, I have been focusing on getting the barn in working order. Moved all the "crap" outside and focused on hot water tank and instead of just doing the one sink on the milking side, I decided to do the utility sink on the general side. Wish I had another week to get all the shelves and stuff back inside but its off to work tomorrow...

As for any other news... OH, my brother came down with his dog. A yearling border collie I think. The goats of course were going nuts :) They lined the fence with all the babies behind em to "protect" them. I decided to see what Legion would do with a kinda hyper herding dog so over to him and the other boys we went. Justice and Fun Boy didnt want anything to do with the dog. Darius only came out of the pen because Legion did. Dog on leash for about the first 10 minutes. Darius not to happy with the dog, so just before that put him back in his pen with just Legion out. I was totally amazed. Outta 45 minutes of being with that dog, he only trotted a few steps once. All the other times the dog got to close, he would present his horns, give a little butt if the dog got close enough, but was never fearful or even aggressive. After about another 15 minutes, Legion just ignored the dog and just stood around with us getting a scratch and a good boy. It was kinda funny though, at one point, Legion was herding the herding dog :)

OH AND, forgot to mention, the first prospects of the year are on their way to the new house in Sandpoint ID. and some great poeple. I dont know if I like not being able to raise em up till weening but the lighter bottle baby load will be most appreciated! :) Especially when we hit the next way of babies :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Dave,

When you sent the bottle buckling to the folks in Sandpoint did you wether them at that young age or do you trust the people will wether them and not use them for breeding?

Maybe going to work will be less work than staying on the farm kidding! :lol:
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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Sent them intact. Get a feel for people who trying to be tricky by the questions they ask and these people have been on the waiting list awhile :). So not even slightly concerned. And if by chance someone did buy some for breeding, they couldnt market them via the bloodlines without registration papers. ADGA keeps a pedigree list on their genetics site and if by some miracle someone found a way to cheat the system, they would still come up under the number of registered kids under a registered animals name. And on the pack goat side, Ill always chose to trust before I dont. Pack owners arent nearly as insane as dairy goat owners :)
 

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I'll tell you a story. In late October when Scout the Oberhasli was 110lbs at 6 months old we were pheasant hunting in a field with a creek. This goat saw the dog swimming around in the water. Seeing all the leaves floating on the surface and the dog in the water Scout decided to jump off a 4 foot bank and sank head first into the water and stopped with his butt up in the air. Well I had just read how goats could swim so I reminded my self in that moment of panic that goats could swim and stood there waiting for him to come up. After what seemed like an eternity I jumped in fully clothed into a mud silt muck up to my chest. I saw scouts neon orange collar in the mud and gave it a yank and could barely move him. He was stuck in the mud. I grabbed an overhanging tree branch and pulled on both the goat and the tree and he popped up.
We both scrambled up the bank he shook the water out of his ears and with in 90 seconds he was eating grass. I was still in shock about what had just happened and I was getting cold. My older goat had my dry coat so I decided to peel off my wet shirt. As I am standing there topless in the middle of no where farm field with 3 goats a sheriff car comes bumbling down the field. So put my coat on, smiled, waved and forever more I'm paranoid about leaves covering water when the goats are around.
We both stuck like swamp water but I was grateful it ended well. IdahoNancy and the Oberpackers
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Truth really IS stranger than fiction!

I grew up in Michigan and remember the stench of the swamp mud. How long was it before you were able to scrub that stench away?!
 

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Oh my, it would be terrifying for your goat to get stuck head-first in swamp water! I'm glad you were able to get him out. And what a time for law enforcement to wander through! Hahaha!

We had a blizzard on Saturday. It dumped about 2 feet in 12 hours. And that's just when Cuzco decided to get sick. None of the goats ate much Friday night (even Nibbles didn't finish her grain and she never leaves food!), so I wondered if there was something weird going on with the weather. But it was calm all night and Saturday morning we just had fog. I was disappointed by our "dud storm" and took everyone's blankets off. The little goats had their appetites back, but Cuzco wouldn't touch his breakfast. At around 9:30 am the snowflakes started to fall. I ran out to haul a load of water for our cistern in case we got snowed in. I'm glad I did because by the time I got home an hour later there was five inches on the ground! When I went to check on Cuzco he was hunkered in his shed, shivering miserably with his food bowl still untouched. His blanket went right back on, but half an hour later he looked worse and I was getting worried because he wouldn't even look at treats or grain. He took a ginger cookie only reluctantly and then dropped most of it back onto the ground.

The blizzard was revving up and a dense fog had rolled down, and even though Cuzco looked unhappy, he didn't seem to be in terrible pain or distress. It was not worth risking life and limb to drive him to the vet. So we brought him into the basement by the wood stove where I took his vitals. Heart rate was good, temperature seemed low. I really didn't like that. He shivered for about 45 minutes even by the fire. He wasn't belching and he felt bloated. There were no gut sounds. I couldn't tell how long it had been since he'd peed, and of course that's the problem we worry about most. He hadn't drunk water all night or morning, and since I didn't know what was wrong with him I wasn't sure if this was a good or bad thing.

Cuzco sat with me in the basement for a couple of hours while I massaged his rumen and scratched his head. There's obviously something wrong when a goat comes into your basement and doesn't even look at the bags of grain by the door or yank you around by his leash while he tries to explore the rest of the house! He seemed to improve quite a bit after he stopped shivering, and eventually we started hearing small belly rumbles and the occasional burp. Soon he started to be interested in the grain bags and that's when I blanketed him and put him back outside. He continued to improve throughout the day, drank some water, and even ate most of his dinner. By next morning he was right as rain and it was obvious from the yellow snow by the back door that there was no urinary blockage. I'm not sure what came over him, but I'm very glad it passed!
 
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