Skin and general health problems

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by TroutRiver, Oct 15, 2010.

  1. TroutRiver

    TroutRiver New Member

    7
    Oct 14, 2010
    Hello everyone,

    I am new here, but thought I would start over here. Sorry, this might get long, I will try to keep it concise. I will post an introduction too so you all know a little more about what's going on, but right now I am concerned about one goat that I have. We call her Mama Red, she is a purebred nubian, about 4-5 years old. We have had a really hard time keeping her healthy ever since we got her. At the beginning of the summer we brought her home along with her 2 year old daughter and two bucklings, all from the same farm. They were the first goats that I brought onto my property, there were no others at that time. A couple weeks after we got them, they all started acting very weak and lethargic. We were told that they were wormed a few days before we brought them home, so the vet ruled out worms and was trying to figure out what else might be going on. The younger doe (Mama Red's daughter) went downhill very quickly over the course of a weekend and we actually lost her before we figured out that they did have parasites (not sure if the wrong kind of wormer was used, the wrong dose given, or what might have happened there). The other three were given an injectible dewormer and we have been using rotational grazing up until a couple weeks ago (I am up north and the pasture is pretty much spent for the season now). We wormed them again 3 weeks ago with a pelleted wormer (about one month after the injectible dewormer was given).

    The two bucks are doing great, and we have several other goats now that came from a different farm, all of which are very healthy. But Mama Red is still really skinny. She's gained a little weight but not much, and now she has a big bald spot on her neck that seems to be spreading. The vet came out yesterday and took a skin scraping. He called me back and said he did not see any mites, and he thinks it's ringworm, but that ringworm usually doesn't affect adult goats, which means there may be some kind of immune deficiency going on with her. He mentioned CAE but said there wasn't much in the way of reliable testing for that.

    Right now, I am giving her a little bit of grain (alfalfa pellets and organic dairy grain, 50-50), washing down her neck with an iodine solution daily and putting an over-the-counter athlete's foot cream on the spot on her neck. That's what the vet told me to do. My questions have partially to do with short term care and partially to do with a long-term solution. Does this treatment seem reasonable? Is there anything else besides ringworm that it might be? As far as the long-term goes, what would you all do if you had a goat like this? Should I be culling her out of my herd, or is this something that might be circumstantial and might pass with time and care?


    :whatgoat:
     
  2. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Welcome... :wave:

    :scratch: that doesn't make sense to me... as ringworm.... can target certain animals...and can get on any animal... any age.... at any time....even humans...so where gloves....treating with Iodine and athletes foot stuff is good to use...

    As for the weight loss....I would recommend getting a fecal done for cocci and worms..... it sounds as if your vet is just guessing here....by getting this done you will be able to see...what is ailing the goats.... with cocci ...not always do they show scouring signs....adult goats loose weight no matter how well fed..... :hug:

    Have you taken their temps?
     

  3. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    agree with Pam -- disagree with your vet

    1) get a fecal done - check for coccidia and worms, get the egg count not just "they have worms" as your answer. Demand the know, you are paying you should know.

    2) a doe after feeding kids will loose weight and needs to build it back so put her on a nice high protein feed -16%-18% a good way to add protein to the diet is through BOSS (Black Oil Sunflower Seeds - yes the kind the birds like). Give her a couple handfuls with her feed. THis will also help her skin

    3) Ringworm effects even humans so wear gloves!

    As Pam said Adult goats dont always scour when they have coccidia (kids usually do) they just loose muscle mass and this makes those dairy does look like skin and bones.

    If you vet comes back wtih a positive for coccidia in the fecal then treat with Dimethox (powder found at Tractor Supply Company or feed store) or Albon (Rx) Corid can work but you need to dose at 1cc per 4lbs to be effective and thats a lot for a large breed adult. Corid can be found at your feed store. There is also Sulmet (not labled for goats but does work. give 1cc per 5lbs first day and 1cc per 10lbs the following 4 days).

    If he says: she has strongyles then treat with Ivermectin injectable (labled for cattle) and give orally at the rate of 1cc per 20lbs. Repeat in 7-10 days.

    Or you can give Safeguard Goat dewormer liquid: weight goat, divide by 2.2 multiply by 10 then divide the answer by 100 that will be the # of ccs you should give. Estimate the weight high rather then low.

    Note: if one goat has worms or coccidia then they all probably do so treat everyone accordingly.

    Hope that helps

    And welcome to TGS :wave:
     
  4. TroutRiver

    TroutRiver New Member

    7
    Oct 14, 2010
    Thanks, I will look into having a fecal test done ASAP. She is looking a little better after a few days of iodine and athletes foot cream treatment. The vet took temps while he was here and they were all normal. Thanks so much for your help.
     
  5. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Your very welcome..... keep us updated.... :thumb:
     
  6. KFOWLER

    KFOWLER New Member

    184
    Oct 5, 2010
    OKLAHOMA
    This past spring I went to look at some does for purchase. The owner had said she also had a buck that was a little scratched up. When I got there I took the does and went to look at the buck (in a different pen) and he had lost most of his hair and had scaly patches on his skin...he was a little more than just scratched up!!!! I went ahead and took him mainly because he wasn't being cared for...he looked horrible. We actually changed his name to Mangy Mike (after my ex-hubby) :wink: It was a Sunday(no vet open) so we stopped by a Southern Ag store and the vets assistant came and looked at him and gave me some antibiotic and some pink colored spray to use. I'm glad to say that he is doing well...all his hair has grown back and he is chasing the girls!!!! I never really figured out what he had and none of his herd mates ever got it.
     

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  7. KFOWLER

    KFOWLER New Member

    184
    Oct 5, 2010
    OKLAHOMA
    Stacey...can any of the wormers u mentioned be given to pregnant does??
     
  8. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Yes they are safe, the only wormer I can think of that isn't safe for pregnant does is Valbazen
     
  9. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    liz is correct - the ones i mentioned: ivermectin and safeguard - are both safe for pregnant goats. Valbazen isnt safe in the first 3 months of pregnancy but most just refrain from the use of it all together on pregnant goats.
     
  10. myfainters

    myfainters New Member

    Oct 29, 2009
    Lancaster, CA
    I agree 100% with the treatments mentioned above but also have one other important point I didn't notice get covered.....minerals..... what kind if any are you feeding? How much do you see the goats eating it.... are you feeding a loose mineral or block?

    Also, CAE, CL and Johnes can all be tested for through a simple blood test and then sending the blood sample in to a trusted lab like WADDL or UC Davis. :)

    You may want to look into a different vet.... one that knows goats. (Although, trust me I KNOW how hard it is to find one of those!!!! :sigh:)

    By the way WELCOME to the group! :wave: