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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Based on our location and economic status, around here it can be very difficult to sell registered Kikos often people are not willing to pay a premium for registered goats. Its now pouring down rain here so I was kind of thinking about planning for next year.

In the past we have added to our stock from a variety of locations, some were selected based on appearances, make up etc. While we have also purchased a few based on yeah we have to get them out of here.

Oddly enough the ones we have purchased from less than ideal locations have done very well and ended up being more parasite resistant and very healthy.

So I was wondering if there was any validity in my theory that perhaps some goats may end of being a good choice based on the fact that they are doing ok in less than an ideal setting?
 

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I think it is completely valid to think that the goats that survived okay in unhealthy environments would then thrive in healthy ones. It's all about parasite resistance and resilience. If you take a goat from a farm that is giving it all the support its body needs and take it to a farm where the management style demands the goat becomes more self sufficient, it likely won't do well because it hasn't been bred with "hands off" management style in mind.

Evaluate your goals. Are you looking to breed self sufficient goats? Are you looking to breed Kikos to improve the breed? Are you just looking to breed meat goats? Is conformation important to you? Which things are most important to you? These are all examples of things you should be asking yourself. Once you find those goals, outline what will help you achieve them. What stock aligns with your goals and which do not. Don't breed the ones that aren't helping you reach those goals.

I hope I'm not just reiterating things you are already thinking.馃槄
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think it is completely valid to think that the goats that survived okay in unhealthy environments would then thrive in healthy ones. It's all about parasite resistance and resilience. If you take a goat from a farm that is giving it all the support its body needs and take it to a farm where the management style demands the goat becomes more self sufficient, it likely won't do well because it hasn't been bred with "hands off" management style in mind.

Evaluate your goals. Are you looking to breed self sufficient goats? Are you looking to breed Kikos to improve the breed? Are you just looking to breed meat goats? Is conformation important to you? Which things are most important to you? These are all examples of things you should be asking yourself. Once you find those goals, outline what will help you achieve them. What stock aligns with your goals and which do not. Don't breed the ones that aren't helping you reach those goals.

I hope I'm not just reiterating things you are already thinking.馃槄
Honestly our focus seems to be moving towards meat goats and Ultimately have more self sufficient goats. Additionally my wife would also like to have a few more Nubians as she has an interest in milking. I really do not see confirmation being an important item other than having good stock that is in line with our goals.
 

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Raising Quality Show & Commercial Goats
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I started with Spanish, myotonics, kiko x boers, boers. I found out my Spanish were krazy, jumpers, couldnt work with them, just too much work. Sold them. The kikox boers are wonderful girls. Top seller of kids. Easiest to work with. Less dewormer, sickness, or injury. I sold my Kiko x boer buck, got top dollar..( should have been a clue). Bought 100% reg Boer does, each with 100% reg boer bucklings. All of superior bloodlines for show. Since then Ive bought several full blood reg does.
My reg. Does are all show quality . All need more maintenance, deworming, and general care than my crosses.
Yes a few kidds will bring more $$$, but not all of them are perfect for shows.
My Vet says anytime you say registered or fullblood you double the cost to keep. Hes right.
I have kept my 3 kiko x boer does, 3 savannah x boer does, 1 Tennesses meat goat , 1 Tennessee meat goat x boer, and 9 full blood reg. Boer does. So after kidding season. 1st of March. Ill let you know how many does Stay or go..lol I have 3 reg. Boer Bucks. 1 Myotonic buck & 6 myotonic does that I started with. Lol lol.
So good luck, and enjoy whatever path works for you!
 

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I had some Kikos for awhile- then decided the meat route wasn't for me. (I loved those baby kikos!). They are, as a breed, wonderful goats. The moms were easy kidders,
took care of the kids, the kids grew well and the bucks were pretty much self sufficient. I even milked them after we weaned the kids. Good sweet milk.

Since they were pretty much wild for much of their history over in New Zealand, they should have pretty good resistance to parasites. (until they get ruined here in the USA!)

I agree, the ones that had minimal fussing over probably have better parasite resistance. (only if they had adequate nutrition- a starving critter will not be able to resist illness or parasites).
 
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