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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
See Georgia's front legs? How they are bowed?



If it isn't genetic, what would be causing them to be like nutrition wise?
 

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I think it is how his hooves are trimmed. The toes look a little long so he is standing funny.

Trim down the toes a little at a time and you should see improvement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes the hooves are long, the whole herd needs trimmed but do to an injury from my stupid horse i couldn't, and then when I went to trim hooves few days ago one of my pygmys caused me to slice my thumb open with the hoof trimmer. GRRR Hopefully this weekend I can get everyone done. :D

Thanks
 

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well if after you trim you notice a difference then you know that was the culprit.

I don;t know much about setting up a goat but it almost looks like his legs are to far beneith him, so that could be leading to the bowed look as well
 

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selenium deficiancy. I know when babies re born like that it is due to a selenium deficiancy. I dont know if this is the case here, but that is just my 2 cents :D
 

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her hooves are long but not terribly over grown that it should be causing bowed legs. When did you first start notice the does legs bowing? I agree that it could be a selinium defficiancy. although usually that causes them to go down on the pasturns. Get herhooves trimmed up and a good dose of bose and see how she looks in a few weeks.

beth
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies. Also on the setting her up, her legs aren't too far back. They may be a little too much under her but not by much.

I didn't notice the bow until yesterday when someone pointed it out.

She had her hooves trimmed today.

I was thinking Bose shot was needed also. Last one was in June...


Thanks again.
 

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How old is she and how many doses of BoSe has she been given? That is usually the culprit for leg issues like that, but maybe not if you have been giving her the shots. What dosage are you using? The normal is 1cc per 40#.
 

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What is the frequency for Bo-Se in Selenium defecient areas?? I understand 1cc per 40 lbs, but I have a sheet that says once a year. Another source that says 1/4 cc every 3 months, but does not mention weight. I hate just guessing on goat stuff when things are not labeled clearly.
Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Georgia was born April 16, she was given a bose shot the day she was born.
She had another bose shot back in June.
 

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Then I don't think it's Selenium. We've not had to give it to anyone but the kids when they are born. Some do give it annually, but if we don't see a need, we don't give it. Maybe you can do the pvc pipe thing and splint one at a time and see if it straightens them out? I really don't know.
 

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Just mentioned this to my husband. He said Selenium deficiency wouldn't make the legs bowlegged which has to do with the bones. He's bowlegged so I guess he should know. :D He said either it's genetics or as a kid, they were walking on too soft a foundation. Like if they stayed in alot of straw in the barn too long and the joints didn't set right.
 

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Ok- my only knowledge of this is through horses so feel free to ignore everything I say. Bowlegged to me means () from the front of the goat -( from the side of the goat is over at the knee (we are talking front legs?) This sometimes happens with horses as a matter of confirmation but can also be causes by a defiency of copper or pain in the foot. What happens is that one of the flexor tendons is contracted in the lower leg which causes the knee to not fully extend. If mild, it ususally is not a serious fault as it doesn't seem to cause any real problems.
I have no idea whether this applies to goats at all. Vut if I had a foal with that much, I would not worry about it at all unless it was sudden and getting worse. A lot of the time it straightens out as the foal gets older as the contraction is due to the folding in the womb- but usually within a few weeks of birth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all the replies.

Another person said lack of calcium may cause it to. SO she's getting alfalfa pellets and hay. Plus her free choice mineral. She hasn't had much mineral lately because of moving everyone around. She has the mineral now so maybe it was a vitamin/mineral deficency(sp?).
 
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