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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In a podcast that I listen to using spent grain from breweries to feed goats was brought up, and that got me thinking that we have a lot of microbreweries around our town, and that it would probably be something I could get my hands on. I did some research yesterday and came up with some old threads, including one from @fivemoremiles about using it. I found out that it needs to be given with some form of alfalfa because the phosphorus is high, and the calcium is low. I heard that it is really high in protein so I feel like I'd be concerned about kids getting too large for easy kidding. I'm also not sure how it would affect my mineral program. My final concern is how well it keeps. I'm worried that in my warm wet climate it is going to spoil too quickly. But hey, it might be free! So I feel like I have to give this the best research I've got. Anyone here use it, or have thoughts or opinions on using spent grain? 馃

I found this site on it nutritional profile, but I couldn't make 100% sense of it. 馃え
Brewers grains | Feedipedia
 

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I haven't used brewer's grains, but I have used corn mash from making whiskey. I think it should be fairly similar in some respects to brewer's grains. It will go bad after about 5 days in the summertime, but if you had a cool place to store it, it would keep much longer. My goats loved it, but I eventually quit feeding it because it was too much protein for Josie, even when I fed in moderate amounts. However, it would be a good feed for an animal that needs more protein! My goats seem to all do well on a 14% protein feed and a dab of alfalfa for the milkers, so they really don't need a lot of extra protein. I may revisit the mash if feed prices get too exorbitant. I have kicked around the idea of mixing a very small amount of mash with something like chopped pumpkin or another food that Josie really likes, to keep her busy on the milk stand without giving too much protein at once. But that would be a lot of work, so I just keep buying the bagged feed since I can still afford it. :)
Funny story: I had some folks who'd grown up in Arkansas out here buying a goat from me. They were down by the pig pen shortly after my sister had fed corn mash to her pigs. They started sniffing and said, "SOMEBODY is making shine!"
I explained and we had a good laugh. The mash definitely has a distinctive smell!
In my opinion, if you can find a way to haul it, you could get some and see how your goats do on it. You're not going to find any sort of guaranteed analysis, since each batch of grains may be slightly different from the next. If they're wet grains, there's going to be a lot of water that may have to be skimmed off the top and thrown out before feeding. And what your goat actually receives may be 80% water. In my experience with mash, the stuff at the top is always very wet, whereas the stuff at the bottom is probably more like 50-60% moisture content, since the heavier grains sink to the bottom of the container, leaving the water on top.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your input @Caileigh Jane Smith. 馃檪 I don't know that I have a cool place to store it, so that would be an issue. That is a funny story about the pigs! 馃槃

How many goats do you have? You would also need to find out what amount the brewery would expect you to take. I know some brewery's would expect you to take the whole batch of spent grain.
I only have two does eating grain on the milk stand right now so it definitely won't work if I have to take a whole load.

I am interested in feeding it to our chicken flock too, so if anyone has input on that front I'd be glad to hear it.
 

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I fed the mash to our chickens, too. I didn't replace their regular feed with it, but I added it in a separate dish that they could peck at. I noticed a possible correlation between feeding the mash and my hens getting egg bound. I'm not certain if it was because the high protein in the mash caused problems, or if it threw off their calcium balance. These are older birds that have had other problems, too, so again, I'm not certain that the mash was the culprit. But I haven't had anyone getting egg bound since I quit feeding the mash.
I do give milk to the hens nearly every day now, too, since I have plenty. So I'm sure that helps keep their calcium levels up.
Again, it would be worth experimenting with. The chickens liked it, and you might be able to add alfalfa pellets or something to even out the calcium. I tried alfalfa pellets and oyster shells, but my hens would never get excited about eating them.
 

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I have fed spent grain.
Here is the low bown.
Never feed more than 20% of there feed as spent grain.
More than 20% causes polio in your goats
Spred the grain out so one goat can not hog it all
I lost a buck to polio because he hogged the grain

It causes faster hoof growth
It makes you goats look great
Cuts feed costs
Keeps for 3 days in summer and 6 ln the winter
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have fed spent grain.
Here is the low bown.
Never feed more than 20% of there feed as spent grain.
More than 20% causes polio in your goats
Spred the grain out so one goat can not hog it all
I lost a buck to polio because he hogged the grain

It causes faster hoof growth
It makes you goats look great
Cuts feed costs
Keeps for 3 days in summer and 6 ln the winter
Thanks so much for the low down! Is that 20% of their total feed or just grain ration?
 
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