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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's been a lot wetter here than usual, and one of my milkers started getting bumps on her udder. They have been there for probably two weeks now. I mostly quarantined her, but now my other milker is getting the bumps.
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As you can hopefully see, there are lots of bumps and a few with white heads. Does it look like staph?

The first doe got five days on Penicillin, but it didn't seem to do much. I started washing her with Chlorhexidine gluconate in some water and then washing her again with regular soap. It seems to be improving slowly. I also have been lathering her with Neosporin. I just bought some Ammens powder, but haven't used it yet. What else should I do? Should I give the other doe Penicillin?

The other doe has three week old kids on her. Are these treatments safe with them? I can apply them at night when the kids are separated.
 

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Use the Chlorhexidine full strength and leave it..don't wash it off. B complex daily until you see improvement to support their system.
 
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I don't know that penicillin is going to help you much here. You want to wash the udders as the others have stated. Try to avoid any heavy topical creams that will trap moisture on the udder. Try to keep them as clean and dry as possible. I know that's hard when the weather is wet. :) do keep an eye on them for a few weeks after the last spot has cleared, to be sure it doesn't come back. Boosting the goats' overall health really helps keep staph at bay. When I had a doe that was really struggling with staph, I worked a lot on making sure she had all the minerals she needed, parasites were under control, and that she was physically in good shape. I even dried her off soon after being bred last year, so that her body would have time to really bounce back before she kidded again. She seems to have kicked it. I haven't seen any bumps on her udder so far this freshening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I don't know that penicillin is going to help you much here. You want to wash the udders as the others have stated. Try to avoid any heavy topical creams that will trap moisture on the udder. Try to keep them as clean and dry as possible. I know that's hard when the weather is wet. :) do keep an eye on them for a few weeks after the last spot has cleared, to be sure it doesn't come back. Boosting the goats' overall health really helps keep staph at bay. When I had a doe that was really struggling with staph, I worked a lot on making sure she had all the minerals she needed, parasites were under control, and that she was physically in good shape. I even dried her off soon after being bred last year, so that her body would have time to really bounce back before she kidded again. She seems to have kicked it. I haven't seen any bumps on her udder so far this freshening.
That's a good point about overall health. Thanks.
 
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