Starting Step 2 - Need Advice

Discussion in 'Pack Goat Training' started by briar-hill-boer-goats, Aug 31, 2015.

  1. briar-hill-boer-goats

    briar-hill-boer-goats New Member

    24
    Aug 2, 2015
    Northwest Ohio
    I have a February born Oberhasli whether. I bottle raised him and we have a very good and strong bond together (he follows me like a puppy dog when I let him out of his pen). I am wanting to train him for packing and when/if he gets big enough carting. I have already done what I consider step 1 (having a very strong bond). I am working on step 2: lead training. He has had very minimal use with a lead. I am wondering if I should start with the normal lead or if I should halter train with a lead connected to his collar but not being used to lead him (I made my own lead that is about 2 feet-ish and I have 3 others that are like 15 feet). Any information/advice is very helpful. Thank you in advance.
     
  2. SalteyLove

    SalteyLove Well-Known Member

    Jun 18, 2011
    New England
    bump! I only do very basic leading with my herd but hopefully someone else can guide you! Definitely get started, he is more than old enough!
     

  3. idahonancy

    idahonancy Member Supporting Member

    436
    Dec 13, 2008
    Idaho North
    My goats walk on dog leashes. 2 of my Obers walk on a double dog lead. It is much easier to walk them with the halters as you will have control of their heads. Leading a goat was not difficult for me as my goats followed me easily. The lead training started at 1 month old with a collar and a leash. At 5 months they could fit a small rope halter. From 5 months on I use a halter to lead but always have a collar on in case I have to stop and tie them to something. Use the collar to tie out not the halter. I live on the edge of suburbia. My goats are use to walking in the city on a leash at a very young age. Lots of practice, short walks at first.
    This lead and follow training is important. My goats can be put on a pack string. The halter of the back goat tied to the collar or saddle of the front goat. This can be handy if you run into spasmodic horses on a trail or any time you need your goats moving single file.
    How is your training going.
     

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  4. FloatnRockRanch

    FloatnRockRanch New Member

    315
    Feb 7, 2015
    Bellingham, WA
    Following! Thank for the great information idahonancy!

    Just wanted to mention to the OP...there is also a ton of information on packgoat central, another forum that works together with this one.
     
  5. Encgoatlady

    Encgoatlady Encgoatlady

    48
    Mar 20, 2015
    Encinitas, ca
    This is a great thread for me because I am starting training with my two April born wethers, one Oberhasli and the other an Alpine. We are now up to 1 mile trail walks.

    A leash and collar are working well for me, but I may need to move to a halter when they get bigger. I have to cross a fairly busy 2-lane highway to get to the trail I want and my biggest challenge so far has been crossing that street with them because they are not used to the cars. It gets easier every time, though. Amazing how quickly they learn.

    They are leashed only when on a street or if we are passing someone on horseback. On trails, they just follow me single-file. Right now I just want to get them in shape for longer hikes. They seem pretty up for it!
     
  6. SalteyLove

    SalteyLove Well-Known Member

    Jun 18, 2011
    New England
    Soooo... if you are packing/hiking with your goats - they don't stop the entire way along the trail and browse? Or they do stop and browse but just keep up with you?
     
  7. FloatnRockRanch

    FloatnRockRanch New Member

    315
    Feb 7, 2015
    Bellingham, WA
    Have no real long hiking experience, but what I've seen from our guys in our short hikes, they browse along the way. When we go out it's really more to allow them the opportunity to browse an some quiet outdoor time for us to hang and talk and spend time with them. It's relaxing and fun. The kids learn about the woods and find things to do along the way too.

    The goats eat as we talk and slowly walk along. The kids take off running the goats tend to follow. It's very much like taking your dog out.
     
  8. idahonancy

    idahonancy Member Supporting Member

    436
    Dec 13, 2008
    Idaho North
    The stopping a browsing behavior depends. If the goat is hungry like we take off before breakfast, this happens when we are archery hunting, I figure they can eat later in the morning and so they do. The age of the goat, I don't push my young goats as much and may take more breaks. If they are hungry and want to browse as we walk they can do it but not if they stop in front of people. They go behind people or get a trekking pole in the pin bone. If we are on a wide trail they can be anywhere they want as long as they do not routinely get in the way of our walking. When they are browsing behind me as I walk they seem to stay with me if we are in new territory. When they do lag behind they catch up on their own without me calling them. This happens more in familiar territory. If the goat has a loaded pack and working they eat less on the trail. I see this with hot weather and steep hill climbs also. My friends often get concerned about how a packgoat will navigate a difficult area like a stream or fallen log. I always say never look back they'll figure it out themselves. I do watch them out of the corner of my eye but never let the goat know you are looking. Act like you don't care and keep on walking. Works everytime.
     
  9. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you Staff Member Supporting Member


    This ^^^

    I tried to explain to someone one time that you don't really train them to pack, you teach them that they are part of your herd. She asked me how I taught them to stay with me, to not follow other hikers, etc. I told her "I don't... I expect them to do it, believe they will do it, and they do.
     

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    Last edited: Oct 28, 2015
  10. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oh, and here you will see a difference too. Nancy's boys are heavy packers. They pack the camp in and haul the hunted meat back out. They are big, stocky, smart, enduring, and tough.
    Mine are fast and light packers. They never carry more than 15 to 20 lbs. They are high spirited but gentle, long legged, lighter of body, smart, enduring, and tough.

    Part of choosing your pack goat is choosing the type you really need. Nancy and I both chose the type of boys that allow us to take off into the woods for a week but, in two very different ways.
     
  11. fivemoremiles

    fivemoremiles Well-Known Member

    Jan 19, 2010
    western montana
    It is so fun to be hiking and have your goat walking above the trail bout 10 yards from ya. and then a few minutes later your goat will be below the trail. I do not lead my goats after I get about 1/4 mile from the trailhead.
    I thought my hiking days were over when my back went out. but with my goat a hike becomes a stroll.
    Fly fishing is a trip. I got to watch my back cast. my goat is normaly in the way
     
  12. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you Staff Member Supporting Member

    Last edited: Oct 29, 2015
  13. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you Staff Member Supporting Member

  14. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you Staff Member Supporting Member

  15. Bob Jones

    Bob Jones Member

    848
    Aug 21, 2009
    Yes!! It takes more time to train yourself to pack a saddle bag and adjust a saddle so it doesn't fall off, than to train the goat to follow you as part of the herd.

    The only real pack training comes when they actually have packs and they get snagged on stuff. Then it is helpful if you can command them to stop and wait for help. Some of your goats will snag stuff intentionally trying to wipe the pack off their back, others will avoid the hassle.