Starting to worry about getting the girls bred.

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by tracyqh, Sep 13, 2010.

  1. tracyqh

    tracyqh New Member

    394
    Aug 9, 2010
    Ohio
    :help: I'm new to goats. Bred horses for nearly 20 years via AI and even work on a breeding farm. Goats are NOT horses. :chin:

    We got a LaMancha/boer and Alpine does last spring. My cousin brought his Savanna buck over the 1st of Sept and I seen him breed the Lamachax but the Alpine has never come in heat. I may be alittle early on her though. I've been reading and now I'm thinking the LaMancha is polled or was had an extremely well done disbudding job. She is a 1.5 and the Alpine is now 4. Neither had babies last year but a young buck and too many does was the said culprit. The Apline had twins the year before.

    I'm I starting to panic or what? The Lamanchax is due to come in heat around the 20th. If she doesn't, I'm going to ultrasound her. If she's empty, do I worry?

    We have just swapped out the Savanna buck for a boer buck. He's only 7 months old and I worry about that too. Can someone either confirm my fears or tell me to get over it? :greengrin:
     
  2. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    you have seasonal breeders so your does are JUST now coming into heat. This is totally normal and most people dont breed till October/November anyway because the strong heats arent really till the later fall months.
     

  3. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    I agree...don't worry, if your munchie x isn't settled can you bring back the Savanna?
     
  4. tracyqh

    tracyqh New Member

    394
    Aug 9, 2010
    Ohio
    Thanks for the reasurrance. I was just hoping the girls weren't sterile. If they were a horse, I could palpate the ovaries and check for activity. That won't work for goats! lol
     
  5. kannm

    kannm New Member

    267
    Mar 18, 2009
    :greengrin:
     
  6. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    A lot of times seasonal breeders don't get really serious about cycling until October. Some will cycle earlier when exposed to a buck but other won't do a thing until Late Sept. or Oct. My favorite time to breed them is mid-late October because I feel that March is the best Month for them to kid--not too cold but still cold enough to keep parasites and creepy crawlies at bay for another month or two until the kids buildup some resistance.
     
  7. tracyqh

    tracyqh New Member

    394
    Aug 9, 2010
    Ohio
    Thanks for the insight. I've just done horses my whole life and we can go in and feel what is happening with those ovaries. Then we can pull blood, check hormone levels and suppliment with progestrone, prostoglandin, etc. With goats there is no palpation and I'm a NEED TO KNOW PERSON. :GAAH: :)

    We'll put some mares under lights in November to "trick" them in to coming in to heat in Feb. so we can get them bred earily so the yearlings will be older and bigger at sale and breaking time. With 16hrs of light and 8 hours of darkness, their pituatary gland thinks it's spring. They will be outside for as much natural light (and free light) as possible. At dusk they come in to stalls for artifical light and they automatically shut off around midnight.

    After a month under lights, we start teasing and palpating. Just because she is showing heat, does not mean she is producting breedable folicals. We do all Artifical Insemination at our farm with 7 stallions in Ohio and Indiana. We ship semen starting Feb. 15th and go thru July 15th.

    We know and track ovarian activity to the size of the developing folicle. Not to be able to do this on the goats in making me crazy. Maybe I'm a control freak? :shocked: I love these goats like my own sons. I was telling a client about how my I love them and how werid it is to me to love a farm animal so much. I've raised and shown horses and cattle my whole life so it's not like I'm new to animals or something. He hit it on the head when he said,"well your whole life horses and cattle were thought of as a commodity. Something that was always for sale. The goats are like your pets. You'll milk them, raise babies for sale and make soaps, cheeses, etc. but the does are your pets if you want to admit it or not. These are farm PETS not farm COMMIDITIES". It all made sense then. :laugh:
     
  8. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    Yep, soooo much truth in that statement! You can't help but love them :love: