Storing hay on Pallets

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by MellonFriend, Sep 5, 2019.

  1. MellonFriend

    MellonFriend Well-Known Member

    I am currently trying to figure out how to store my hay for the winter. My barn will be able to hold some of the hay I need, but not all of it. I am looking into the tarp and pallet idea and I have a few questions. I see a lot of different methods. All of these end with putting a tarp over the whole thing, but my question plays into what to do under the hay. I've heard some people do hay on pallets, hay on tarp on pallets, hay on pallets on tarp, hay on pallet on pallet. Which method do/would you use? Another question I have is when you cover the whole stack how does that allow for air flow? I mean hay needs airflow in order not to combust, right?
     
  2. NigerianDwarfOwner707

    NigerianDwarfOwner707 Well-Known Member

    May 17, 2018
    East Coast, USA
    Always on pallets. I can never find pallets to buy so I just use 4x4s.

    IMG_7864.jpg
     

  3. ReNat

    ReNat Well-Known Member

    407
    Jan 20, 2019
    Rossia
    The pallet is always good because, it rips the hay off the ground and damp! If you store hay on the street, you will lose part of the hay, how much will be the loss of hay depends on the density of the winding hay bale the denser, the better...
     
    toth boer goats likes this.
  4. Goats Rock

    Goats Rock Member

    Jun 20, 2011
    NE Ohio
    When I had to store hay outside, we had it on a hay wagon. There were gaps in the wood they made up the deck, so pallet like. I put pallets on the top too, then went overboard and put cut pool noodles along the pallet edges so they didn't rub the tarp. Put a big tarp over the entire thing and tied it down. It was late fall, so not a lot of warm sun and the pallets kept the tarp from direct contact with the hay.
     
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  5. SalteyLove

    SalteyLove Well-Known Member

    Jun 18, 2011
    New England
    I would do tarp on ground, then two layers of wood pallets, then hay, then tarp. But stake and tie the top tarp corners out away so it makes like a tent and there will be airflow rather than wrapping the top tarp tight against the stack
     
    MellonFriend and Iluvlilly! like this.
  6. ReNat

    ReNat Well-Known Member

    407
    Jan 20, 2019
    Rossia
    I think we need to think that cheaper tarpaulin or lose part of the hay during storage. In the end, hay it is a fertilizer and tarpaulin
     
  7. fivemoremiles

    fivemoremiles Well-Known Member

    Jan 19, 2010
    western montana
    Pallets on the ground to keep the air flow. ground to give the water a place to escape. tarp the stack. leave some hay exposed on the sides to let air circulate.
    put tires on top to keep the wind from getting under the tarp and ripping it to peaces.
     
    ReNat likes this.
  8. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you Staff Member Supporting Member

  9. SeventeenFarms

    SeventeenFarms Active Member

    247
    Dec 9, 2013
    Southern New Jersey
    We keep ours in a garage with a concrete floor and more in a "run in shed" that is a dirt floor. In both cases we put down a sheet of plastic to prevent moisture from coming up from beneath, and stack the bales on pallets, leaving gaps in the stack for air. We know some people in our area who keep the first layer (on pallets) as sacrifice bales - these bales capture moisture and don't let it get to the layers on top. I have never needed to do this, but it is an option. Since both structures protect on three sides and are roofed, we don't need to tarp and they are able to breathe.
     
  10. MellonFriend

    MellonFriend Well-Known Member

    Thanks for all the help guys. Sorry for the silence on my part for the past few day. I had a cold and didn't feel like looking at a screen. Now how about some opinions on how many bales you can stack on a pallet?
     
    toth boer goats likes this.
  11. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    That depends on the strength of the pallet and how high you want to go. I personally won't go higher than 5 high because I don't want to use a ladder. But my hay is in a barn.
     
    toth boer goats likes this.
  12. SeventeenFarms

    SeventeenFarms Active Member

    247
    Dec 9, 2013
    Southern New Jersey
    Five to six high, which I can reach to put up and bring down.