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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,
I have a question. When i'm reading about how to show goats, and the showmanship manuals, i keep reading that you should "know your goats conformation faults and strive to overcome them". So, I'm not the best at finding conformation faults, but i'm learning. But say, if you have a doe with a really steep rum, how exactly would one "strive to over come it". What about a weather who toes out?
I'm a bit confused, because while maybe there are ways to set the goat up to hide them, the judge will probably see them when you are walking your goat. Plus, you can't just change your goats conformation. I am also reading how you don't want to try and cover up all your goat's conformation flaws because it can make you seen deceitful to the judge.
Could any of you shed some light on this?

Also, i want to say a big thank you:stars:
You have all helped answer my goat question and have been very supportive, caring, and helpful. I really appreciate all the advice you have given me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It was mentioned in the showmanship scorecard, so i just assumed that if you were judged on that it must be something to do with showing, setting up, or fitting your goat. :scratch:
 

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7 does - 2 bucks - 1 wether
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Striving to overcome conformation faults is saying that when you breed the goat, find a match that will improve upon their weak points. For instance, I have a lovely doe, with a tiny bit of a steep rump. I will be crossing her with Valentino, my buckling with a very flat rump. That means, that hopefully their kids will have a flatter rump then their dam. Does that make sense? :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks guys!
I was just a bit confused as i thought it was something that happened in the show ring. This makes more sense.

Well if all goes as planned the buck we picked will definitively be breeding up.
 

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For a goat that toes out you can trim their feet to help improve this.
For a goat with a steep rump you need to be more careful how you set their legs so you don't exaggerate the problem.
No matter what the fault wont go away, but you can do some things to not exaggerate or minimize the look.
 

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Care giver of 4 milkers, one doeling, and One beau
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My does have a higher hindquarters , I don't know the right word, then there front I want a buck who looks good in that? I'm sorry my wording is horrible.
 

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in the show ring striving to overcome their faults would mean that if the goat has a steep rump you set the rear legs back and push down on the loin. if your goat toes out you trim the inside toes shorter than the outside. if the goat is narrow in the front end you set the front legs further apart. then you go home and try to breed the faults out. lol
 

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Boers & Nubians
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I agree; part of it is a showmanship thing and part is a breeding recommendation. Of course, there is nothing you do to change a goat's conformation while in the ring, but they may want you to "show it out".

This spring, during a showmanship class, the judge asked me- What is one thing I would change about my goat? I told her that I would make him wider through the chest. She asked how I would do that between now and fair, and I said- It's impossible; I can't. She put me in second place because she had never heard a better answer before. And the reason for that is: It's true!! Nothing you can do about it.

So, by knowing your goat, you can develop a certain way that you set her up to make her look best. Weak chine? Don't extend her back legs as much. Taller hindquarters? Chine her down to a level stance. Small chest? Put her legs straight beneath her, so she's at her own level and doesn't appear weak in the pasterns. ;)
 
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