Stuff to have on hand vs. stuff to buy as needed

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Feira426, Jan 5, 2020.

  1. Feira426

    Feira426 Active Member

    206
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    Hey everyone! I’d like to put together a medical kit/list for my herd since the nearest goat vet to me (that I know of) is about a forty minute drive and may or may not actually know goats super well.

    What do you recommend for stuff to have on hand, and what do you use commonly but buy as needed instead? I’m sure some stuff doesn’t have a long shelf life and might be better to get it fresh when it’s needed, but I was also thinking some commonly used stuff might be good to keep on hand, even if you have to throw out expired stuff and restock from time to time, just to have it right there for emergencies (for when a trip to the store would cost precious time).

    I’m interested in both herbal and synthetic resources.
     
  2. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    If you do a search, there are several threads with lists.
     
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  3. GoofyGoat

    GoofyGoat Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2018
    TEXAS
    One thing that never seems to be on lists but is great to have on hand is DARK beer.
    It always seems to be something everyone whose goats having sub temp or rumen issues has to go get...
    Just an observation.
    Some states don't allow alcohol sales on Sundays or not before noon...
    I'm not a drinker at all, so I had to make it a point to go on my lunch hour to a place that sells beer to get some. We do our marketing on Sunday mornings because of my work schedule and Texas doesn't sell beer before noon...I keep a 6 pack in my pantry so I know I'll have it if I need it. It's come in very handy not just for me but other goat owners I've had to help.
    Edit bad spelling, grammar and typos..needed coffee :(
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2020
  4. LamanchaAcres

    LamanchaAcres Active Member

    620
    Jan 11, 2013
    Though i am lucky to multiple great vets nearby, i prefer to keep just about everything that could be needed on hand, especially med wise. I hate when im missing something that could have been easily picked up beforehand. Med wise- lute and oxytocin are musts for kidding season. I always have multiple antibiotics - nuflor, la200, penicillin, tylan. Multiple pain meds - banamine, meloxicam. Meds for ketosis, preg tox, mastitis etc - calcium gluconate, cmpk, nutridrench. B complex, iron, thiamine, probios, molasses, extra syringes and needles (multiple sizes), vet wrap/guaze, iodine...and the list goes on lol.

    Most of the meds/items are fairly cheap, so if i have to pitch i dont mind. But between my large herd, and my 4h kids, i dont typically throw away a whole lot. Hopefully this helps. Lists are likely going to be somewhat different for everyone.
     
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  5. Feira426

    Feira426 Active Member

    206
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    I did look at several of those already, but I didn’t find any that included information on the shelf life of the items and whether it was best to stock up or just know where to get them. That’s specifically what I was hoping to find out starting this thread. Sorry if I did something wrong.
     
  6. Feira426

    Feira426 Active Member

    206
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    That’s a great idea. I’ve seen dark beer mentioned several times now in different posts. Do you give it with one of those non-needle syringes? Right into the back of the mouth?
     
  7. Feira426

    Feira426 Active Member

    206
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    I have a pretty small herd, and part of my worry is throwing away a lot of stuff as well as just spending loads of money on things I will most likely never need. I have only five goats. I know it would be best to be as prepared as possible but I have to consider the budget too.

    Which of your items would you consider most important for a small scale operation?

    Also, where on earth do you get antibiotics without a prescription? I tried getting some for a sick rooster recently and couldn’t find any.
     
  8. Moers kiko boars

    Moers kiko boars Well-Known Member

    Apr 22, 2018
    Oklahoma
    My first med kit was & is very simple. I have a hanging scale to weigh babies. A sling to weigh them with. Iodine for umbilical cord. I have dental floss..in case I need to seperate umbilical cord. Plastic gloves, lubricant, towels, dog sweaters. I have a head lamp to use, keeps me hands free. I have a material tape measure to take down height, length, and girth measurement. I have a note book with notes & info on delivery problems. I have phone # to call people that have several years goat experience. I have paper towels, alchohol, syringes, kid tube, drenching gun, and dex, red cell, and tubes of vit b combo. I take with me a thermos of warm water. A empty cool whip container with maple syrup in it waiting for water. My colostrum is in the freezer...not had to use it...
    I have an xtra power battery for my phone..i have it fully charged. I have a folding chair in the birthing barn so I can sit in comfort while I wait. And I take a blanket to keep my feet warm.
     
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  9. LamanchaAcres

    LamanchaAcres Active Member

    620
    Jan 11, 2013
    All of my antibiotics are prescription. I cant buy much of anything med wise without one. Lovely California. Im lucky to have 4 phenomenal goat vets local that will prescribe what i need if i cant pick it up at a local tractor supply/ feed store.

    I would definitely have some sort of antibiotic on hand at all times. A pain med would be good too. Maybe see if your vet will sell you just a couple doses of each vs a whole bottle? Some will do that. Little things like b complex, probios, syringes/needles, iodine, molasses and beer are all things i would definitely have on hand.
     
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  10. Feira426

    Feira426 Active Member

    206
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    This sounds great! Is there anything that you find you use frequently but don’t keep on hand? Things that don’t keep long that you just run to buy when you need them?
     
  11. Jessica84

    Jessica84 Well-Known Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    California
    Your going about this in a very smart way! When I first started jf it could be given to goats I bought it. I threw SO MUCH away!
    If you live close to a decent feed store then a lot you can just wait and get as needed. I do not so I only keep things on hand that I might need NOW to save a life.
    Since I have a stomach bug and don’t want to get out of bed lol these are things off the top of my head that I know I keep around.
    Yes dark beer!!! Any stomach issues and they get some
    CD antitoxin
    Tetanus antitoxin
    Today.
    Uterine boluses, those things last for ever and I use those instead of putting on a 5 day antibiotic in a lot of cases
    La200
    Penicillin
    Vitamin B complex
    And spectoguard
     
  12. Moers kiko boars

    Moers kiko boars Well-Known Member

    Apr 22, 2018
    Oklahoma
    I really use all this stuff I mentioned. In everyday stuff. I go through minerals more than anything else. Im starting to do my own fecal samples, so I use alot less of running for stuff. Now I see whats causing the issues and work from this point.
    Im not as experienced as others. So Ive not had their situations.. yet. So I am simple,,and have just a few things. Like tums. For bloat. Pepto bismol too. Garlic for coughs. Sugar & honey for wounds. I really try to stay away from too many medz. Each one causes another problem. So I stay as simple as I can.
     
  13. NigerianDwarfOwner707

    NigerianDwarfOwner707 Well-Known Member

    May 17, 2018
    East Coast, USA
    I think you need to first, make sure you have a good spice cabinet — those come in hand for goats often! Have fresh fruits and veggies, and always some sort of juice on hand like apple or carrot. Always have onions, garlic, etc. but that’s easy cause it’s all human grade!!

    I tend to keep natural stuff on hand. I don’t have chemical dewormers it many antibiotics or injectable other than Vitamin B Complex and the tetanus and enterotoxemia anti toxins (because I don’t vaccinate). I have a vet in a 5 minute radius, another vet in a 45 minute radius, a tractor supply 10 minutes away, and a local co-op with meds 3-5 minutes away. But natural stuff is harder to come by and usually has to be ordered online. So I stock up on this. Supplies is really important, syringes, first aid, that stuff can be more important than drugs and supplements.

    It’s the simple stuff you don’t think about that you need to have. Like beer, which can save a goats life.

    https://thegivinggoat.home.blog/2019/01/06/first-aid-kit-supplies-raising-goats-naturally/

    This is some basic stuff.
     
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  14. Feira426

    Feira426 Active Member

    206
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    This is really interesting! Gonna read up more on this. I don’t really want to vaccinate my goats either but I realize that means I need to find other ways to keep them healthy and safe. I know a little bit about herbal medicines but I’d like to know a lot more.
     
  15. Feira426

    Feira426 Active Member

    206
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    I bought a brewers yeast b-complex thing from the feed store today. It’s a powder. And I bought a liquid Red Cell bottle. I hope these are good. Need to read up now on how and when to use them.

    I really appreciate everybody’s input. This is so enlightening.
     
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  16. GoofyGoat

    GoofyGoat Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2018
    TEXAS
    The Red Cell you bought....it is the kind for horses and cattle ...not dogs correct...there is a difference and the stuff for dogs CAN NOT be used for goats. Not everyone knows this so I thought I would point it out.
     
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  17. Goats Rock

    Goats Rock Member

    Jun 20, 2011
    NE Ohio
    If you are going to have goats kidding, puppy pee pads work great! They are great to put under the doe as she goes thru the birthing process, they catch all the goo and liquid, then put a clean one down for the newborn before it gets all they way out. After its born and navel and feet dipped, lay on a clean pad, get ready to catch the next one etc. saves on cleanup and helps keep the area a little less goo ful.
     
  18. Feira426

    Feira426 Active Member

    206
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    I didn’t know before I looked, but I did see the dog/cat one had a “don’t feed to ruminants” warning on it. So I got the horse one that didn’t say that.
     
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  19. Feira426

    Feira426 Active Member

    206
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    That’s an idea!

    This will probably make me seem really unknowledgeable, but I’ve never heard of dipping newborns’ feet before. What is that for and what do you use?
     
  20. Goats Rock

    Goats Rock Member

    Jun 20, 2011
    NE Ohio
    Well, because newborns feet are still soft, they can get bacteria on them. One year we had a bad time with navel and joint ill. (15 years ago or more), a neighbor down the road who raised sheep, said he always used iodine on the umbilical cord and on the feet. He never had navel I'll, etc. so, the next year I did the feet dipping, we had no problems. So, I've done it ever since. The only kids that I've had any navel ill or joint I'll were ones that didn't get dipped right away. Since I pretty much live in the barn, I catch 98% of my newborns. Last year 117 were born and I attended every birth but 4. Those I got there before they were an hour old.

    It's just what I do.
     
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