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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello all! I want to thank all of you for all of your insightful, informative, and kind advice so far. Today my boys had their surgical castration. I have to say… sometimes I question my vet, but she’s been honest with me about everything, including risks for types of castration. The castration was nowhere near as bloody as I thought - very, very little blood, in fact. It was interesting to see 4 testicles on the ground, lol. The scrotum itself is not stitched shut on either boy, but she did put a stitch in each spermatic cord to prevent any excessive bleeding. She did tell me they should be confined to a small area for the next week or so. I have two gates to clip to the fence - they clip together to form about a 30’-32’ area (where I’ve TRIMMED grass so it isn’t so tall and not so many bugs.

I was torn between banding and surgical, but… I asked for a lot of advice from you all and my vet. I considered all of my options carefully. I went with surgical for one reason (well, two). My vet did tell me that banding is popular, and in goats that have had a healthy start in life and no health problems thus far, it would be great. She gave me her opinion on why we should go with surgical: my boys did not have a healthy (or easy start in life). They’ve had the beginnings of pneumonia at 8 weeks old and had to be treated; they were at one point loaded with sucking lice, had been anemic; they are very small and underweight for 12 weeks (they barely come up to my knees and I’m 4’11” and they only weigh between 22-25lbs). Snowball had the thiamine scare (which, with treatment, he was 100% better after about 40 hours), though she did say that she didn’t have a guarantee that was the problem, but it seemed like some early symptoms. We are waiting on bloodwork for CL (he has a small ball/lump under his jaw that seems to “float” and is kind of squishy. Anyway, she opined that the surgical actually had LESS risk of infection for them, due to their rough start. A banding, while totally okay (she agreed), would be more risky for them as the tissue would have to necrose, and we aren’t sure their immune systems are strong enough. I went back and forth and agonized for 4 weeks, and even though this is going to KILL me money wise, I went with it. Thanks to all of you, you reminded me there was no wrong way to do things.

They got their CDT boosters and rabies shots! They were sedated (verses being anesthetized) with ketamine, dosed with antibiotic, and anti-inflammatory. They are recovering here in the house where it is nice and cool (propped up so they are not lying on their sides and risking bloat; I’ll attach a picture). The only thing I’m chewing my lip over? I bought blu-kote, both for preventing infection and for fly control, but she said she isn’t a fan and to just leave it alone. She said dose them with UltraBoss, but they aren’t due until the 9th. I did under-dose them last time by mistake. I don’t know what to do here, and I’m looking for veteran advice :)

Again, I cannot thank you all enough for the constant support!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good to hear things are ok.
They are moving well and eating and drinking and all that! Do I have to keep them confined to a smaller area or can they just go back to normal and just have the whole backyard? They don’t usually go nuts running or anything - they jump on a few things here or there and come up the stairs to sit on the deck - but all seems well so I didn’t know if the little dudes needed to have any kind of restriction. <3
 

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They are moving well and eating and drinking and all that! Do I have to keep them confined to a smaller area or can they just go back to normal and just have the whole backyard? They don’t usually go nuts running or anything - they jump on a few things here or there and come up the stairs to sit on the deck - but all seems well so I didn’t know if the little dudes needed to have any kind of restriction. <3
I am glad it went well.
I am thinking maybe @Damfino may have experienced advice for you regarding the recovery period.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I am glad it went well.
I am thinking maybe @Damfino may have experienced advice for you regarding the recovery period.
Thank you! I’m getting nervous again. Flower is acting totally normal. He lies down a little bit more today, but it’s HOT and he’s lying in the shade, so I’m really not that worried. Snow lies down and then stands up a bit before he’ll actually find a, what I’m assuming, is a comfortable position. Now, he’s scratching his ears CONSTANTLY and shaking his head, which he wasn’t doing yesterday. He did this weird yawn a few times, but I couldn’t tell if he was grinding his teeth. I sprayed them with blu-kote this morning, so… i can’t really tell if it’s red back there. He’s eating hay and grain; both of my goats either drink when I’m not looking or drink a little around me. Obviously they are not dehydrated or they would be showing signs of that. Snow just got done with a round of Thiamine (B1), but I’m also looking for B Complex, as that was recommended to me on here quite a bit. Honestly, I think he might have something going on with his ears, and I think he’s in pain, but she gave me nothing to give him. She gave them anti-inflammatory yesterday. These boys are going to turn my hair grey before 40 😂
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good to hear things are ok.
Ignore my other reply. Vet set let them roam. Fly control is good. I gave them UltraBoss yesterday, and then of course it rained a bit and they decided (apparently “hey it’s hot, let’s stand in the rain, and then yell until Mom comes out to lead us to shelter.” Don’t know how effective the UltraBoss is now… oy vey!
 

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Applying this product in calm weather when rain is not predicted for the next 24 hours will help to ensure that wind or rain does not blow or wash pesticide off the treatment area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Applying this product in calm weather when rain is not predicted for the next 24 hours will help to ensure that wind or rain does not blow or wash pesticide off the treatment area.
Oh yes, i know that part. There was literally no rain in the forecast. It wasn’t a downpour, but a good drizzle/sprinkle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ignore my other reply. Vet set let them roam. Fly control is good. I gave them UltraBoss yesterday, and then of course it rained a bit and they decided (apparently “hey it’s hot, let’s stand in the rain, and then yell until Mom comes out to lead us to shelter.” Don’t know how effective the UltraBoss is now… oy vey!
I spoke too soon. Snowball is being weird, so she told me get them inside and out of the outrageous heat today. They are currently penned in the dining room where it is a nice 65-67 degrees. Their breathing has slowed down a ton and they seem to be more comfortable. I did spray his sack with blu-kote yesterday and once today, so I can’t tell if what is left is red. So, soon as someone comes home to hold him still, time to take his temp to be sure. Ive seen him eat several times today, even forage a little. I know he’s in pain, but she said I can’t give him anything 😞 I am just worried that something is wrong. I saw him poop and pee this morning, but he hasn’t for a while, so I’m LITERALLY sitting here, facing them, just waiting for him to go to the bathroom again. Flower, on the other hand - doing well.
 
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Keep up the good work.

If it has been 24 hours after you put on the pouronthey should be good and it absorb.

Be careful with big temp change, if it is really hot out and they have been in a nice cool place, be sure they gradually are introduced to the change.
It can cause pneumonia, with big spread temp weather changes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Keep up the good work.

If it has been 24 hours after you put on the pouronthey should be good and it absorb.

Be careful with big temp change, if it is really hot out and they have been in a nice cool place, be sure they gradually are introduced to the change.
It can cause pneumonia, with big spread temp weather changes.
Thank you for reminding me about the change in temp! I nearly forgot about that! Holy crap, that would have sucked big time. It has been 24 hours, BUT… It rained like 10 minutes after I put it on them yesterday 😒 so I hope they absorbed it well. Right now, I’m sitting here going “what the hell is happening” because they are both scratching their ears, and Snow keeps twitching it like he’s trying to shake a fly off. I’m afraid to try and clean their ears - what if i hurt them?
 
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I have a love-hate relationship with Blu-Kote. I think it works very well, BUT as you have observed, it prevents you from being able to observe the wound very well. Your boys should get as much exercise as they want. Exercise helps prevent swelling and encourages blood flow, which really aids the healing process. However, excessive movement can make them sore or cause bleeding. Usually the soreness prevents them from excess movement all by itself so you really don't have to worry about that. They won't feel up to dancing on tabletops until the healing is far enough along that it's safe to do so. Definitely keep them comfortable. Very hot weather can definitely invite illness if they're feeling poorly, and heat tends to inflame wounds. If they do need to go outside, it wouldn't be a bad idea to apply an ice pack wrapped in a damp cloth to their groins every so often if they'll let you. Expect them to be sore for a few days and realize that some goats handle pain better than others. They may not have exactly the same recovery journey.

As for the itchy ears, it's quite possible your goats picked up lice or mites at the vet's office. This is a risk any time you take them where lots of other animals gather. I'm not familiar with treating lice or mites, so maybe others can chime in.
 

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I did spray his sack with blu-kote yesterday and once today, so I can’t tell if what is left is red.
Wonder Dust is an excellent product to use after surgical castration. Shake the bottle, aim the nozzle towards their sacks, squeeze the bottle and a dusting of medication puffs out. It has a drying agent, sulfa drug, and promotes healing without proud flesh. Personally used this product when 2 of the wethers here were surgically castrated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have a love-hate relationship with Blu-Kote. I think it works very well, BUT as you have observed, it prevents you from being able to observe the wound very well. Your boys should get as much exercise as they want. Exercise helps prevent swelling and encourages blood flow, which really aids the healing process. However, excessive movement can make them sore or cause bleeding. Usually the soreness prevents them from excess movement all by itself so you really don't have to worry about that. They won't feel up to dancing on tabletops until the healing is far enough along that it's safe to do so. Definitely keep them comfortable. Very hot weather can definitely invite illness if they're feeling poorly, and heat tends to inflame wounds. If they do need to go outside, it wouldn't be a bad idea to apply an ice pack wrapped in a damp cloth to their groins every so often if they'll let you. Expect them to be sore for a few days and realize that some goats handle pain better than others. They may not have exactly the same recovery journey.

As for the itchy ears, it's quite possible your goats picked up lice or mites at the vet's office. This is a risk any time you take them where lots of other animals gather. I'm not familiar with treating lice or mites, so maybe others can chime in.
Hi there! They actually didn’t go to the vet’s office for the castration - she came out to us. However, I did give them a treatment of UltraBoss. So, if it happens to be lice or anything that that particular product takes care of, I usually see an improvement in about 48 hours (last time every single louse on them was dead in 48 hours).

For now, because of the heat and really high humidity index, the vet had me bring them in where it is cool. She told me to bring them out to walk around again when the weather cools down tonight. They do have an enclosed space in the house (tarp underneath them and bedding on top) with food and water. She suggested giving some electrolytes to encourage them to drink (I have plain water in there too). I let her know that it’s kind of a smallish space, and for now, she let me know that as long as they are standing up, moving around the little pen, eating/drinking, and going to the bathroom, that they should be alright until tonight. She told me not to let them just lie down for hours. They are really starting to perk up now. Since she didn’t want to increase cost for me, she gave me dosing for aspirin for them for pain, and to reduce their fevers. Which, she believes is from their vaccines yesterday. They had aspirin about 3 hours ago and they are perked up and in much better spirits.

When it’s time to let them out to run around again for a bit, we’re going to turn off the air conditioner and open windows so the temperature slowly equals out to what it is outside, and then I’ll let them out. And backtracking to the blu-kote, i 100% agree with what you say. It’s been fantastic in wound care, and I’ve not seen a single fly or bug near their scrotums. But, as we both know, it makes it hard to see if anything is red or inflamed. He’s having a much MUCH easier time lying down now. It’s easy to tell he’s still uncomfortable, but I’m glad you reminded me that not every goat deals with pain or heals the same. I figure they won’t feel the best for a few days but at least I know, between all of the advice here and the vet, that I’m doing the right thing. I’ve talked on here a lot, and these boys did NOT come from a well-cared for or healthy herd. In the 6 weeks I have FULLY owned them, I’ve easily spent 100k+ just trying to get them healthy. I don’t know what breed they are for sure, but they have super soft hair and of course, are cute as hell. But, they are pretty small for 12 weeks. I’m 4’11” and they are just starting to reach my thigh, and they don’t even weigh 30 lbs yet.

I am going to at least TRY an ice pack. Flower is much, MUCH less fidgety - but I’ve been handling him since he was 5 days old. Snowball took weeks and weeks to come around and even let me touch him. Flower MIGHT let me apply ice (with a little help from my son) for a few minutes. Snowball is an enigma there… He’ll probably kick me in the face LOL He already gave me a black eye once (headbutt and horns = ow), but it was my fault. He was into something he shouldn’t have been (my fault) and I ran up to get him out of there and grabbed him up from behind. Pretty sure I scared the crap out of him and he just reared back.

Oh my god, I’ll shut up now. Thank you for the information and advice. I’m taking it ALL in. 🙂
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Wonder Dust is an excellent product to use after surgical castration. Shake the bottle, aim the nozzle towards their sacks, squeeze the bottle and a dusting of medication puffs out. It has a drying agent, sulfa drug, and promotes healing without proud flesh. Personally used this product when 2 of the wethers here were surgically castrated.
😲 I totally forgot that someone mentioned this before! Thank you for reminding me! I’m going to switch to that for now so I can keep an eye out for inflammation or redness and actually see it. I believe i saw it at TSC too!
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Do you have any VetRX? It's for goats or chickens. Kind of smells like Vicks.. Put a few drops in the ears and rub it around. Before that, look in the ears with a flashlight, you might see a big glob of yuk, (ear mites) or even just dry skin.
Oh wow! I never knew that! Flower will let me mess with his ears a bit, Snowball tolerates it for about 10 seconds before he’s like “get away from me” haha. I will DEFINITELY get some. Is it prescription or just something I can buy in store?
 
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