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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Every time I think things are going decently well, Bad things start to hit all at once....
I lost one of my favorite bucklings this afternoon. He has always been a very healthy kid and was growing great and maybe even big for his age. He had never had any health issues.
He was the most cuddly, friendly baby I've ever had in my 11 years of raising goats.

He was completely normal last night, Eating fine and not showing any symptoms.
I worked early this morning so my little sister had to do barn chores alone. When I got home from work between 1-1:30, I went to the barn and when I went to see my little Benji, He didn't stand up at first which I thought was unusual for him. I nudged him a bit and he did then stand up. So I offered him grain and when he wasn't interested I knew something wasn't right.

I let him out of his pen and he walked a little but went into another pen and laid down again. I got him up again and he went and tried to climb into the hay feeder then he actually jumped up into it. Then I think he laid down again.

I checked his eyes for his FAMANCHA, They seemed pretty pale. Which was very weird because he showed no other signs of parasites, Like I said he was growing fast and in no way too thin and his coat wasn't dull. No diarreah. No bloating. He felt slightly warm but not feverish, I didn't have a thermometer on me. Inside his mouth felt normal temperature.
But it was also about 87⁰ outside so everybody was warm.
He just got his first CDT shot about a week ago. He was fed hay from this year, a little bit of grain (What he stole from mom at milking time or if I left him in the pen I'd give him a couple handfuls) and he was still with his mom and nursing overnight when she came in from outside.

For starters I gave him ivermectin, Vitamin B12, and Probios and I was gonna see how he did from there since he showed no symptoms except for acting off and wanting to lay down a lot and no appetite.

I had to run some errands so I was out for a bit. When I got home around 5pm, I went to check on him and he had already passed.

I'm absolutely clueless on what could have happened. It was so quick and with minimal symptoms. I'm just worried I'm missing something and I want to be prepared in case any of my other goats start to act the same way.

Some other (maybe unnecessary) info:
He was a twin but his sister was born stillborn. It was his mom's first birth.

In early 2021, I nearly lost his mom to listeria. But we saved her with high dosages of penicillin/Vitamin B complex every 6 hours for almost 2 weeks and she fully recovered.

He didn't seem to show signs of listeria, When he did walk he walked normal, He just seemed like he had no energy.
 

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I’m so sorry for your loss.


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Sometimes the only way to know what could have happened when there is a sudden and unexplainable death is through a necropsy on the corpse. I understand your concerns for the other goats as well. Loss of appetite and lethargy could be the presenting symptoms for a multiple of ailments. Please get a thermometer to have on hand for the goats. A higher than or less than a normal temperature reading can be a useful diagnostic aid towards helping to pin point the differences between an off rumen and an infection brewing.

I am so sorry your little buckling passed over.
 

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Awe. I'm so sorry. I would get a thermometer and keep on hand. Best thing to do on top of checking famacha is taking temp. Again..Im sorry.
 

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I’m so very sorry for your loss :( even with us doing everything right sometimes things happen, and sadly they can happen fast. I agree a necropsy is the best way to know. We can all give guesses but it won’t be for sure. A few things that I know can kill very fast is, silent pneumonia, over eating disease but in the single case I had it was fast fast! And cocci, although not necessarily is a super fast killer, I learned the hard way it doesn’t always show the classic signs of scours and weight loss.
Again I am so sorry for your loss
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks everyone for your replies
I'm still heartbroken, It took everything in me to keep from crying last night when I let his mom out for milking and she immediately went looking for him and calling him and was so visibly worried he wasn't responding and she even nudged him with her nose. I thought she had realized yesterday before I moved her to a different pen but maybe she only thought he was sound asleep.


While it's extremely hard seeing animals suffering when it isn't so fast, At least there is hope of them recovering and/or you have time to mentally prepare. But when it happens so fast in a matter of hours to one of the healthiest, You can never be prepared for that.
 
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