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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tonight I noticed that Nautical's buckling was only eating on the one side. Went to look and the one other udder is very swollen. Went to milk it out a bit, but it isnt normal. Not milk- almost pus. She has a wound on the udder- scaly spot- but "liquid" comes out like milking. But it is very thick. Not clotted like I would expect from a mastitis case. Like a thick pus almost. No nasty smell (not that I can normally smell most things in the barn; sadly my allergies automatically stop up my nose) but it has a light milk smell and feels creamy almost lotion like and somewhat sticky. I'm going to separate her from him tomorrow and try to completely milk that side out. Just wondering suggestions- should I treat her for mastitis or treat as CL? Her kid is already going for butcher, though my niece wants to show him for county fair. I won't let her show him if he has any visible cysts.

I haven't tested my herd for CL, but I'm fairly certain we probably have it. We have had multiple cysts here but I have had none in udders that I have seen before. I always seperate ones with cysts and lance, clean, and wait for cysts to heal before returning goats to the herd. I don't believe in automatically culling for CL or cysts. I would lose too many of my herd if I did that. I won't sell any that I know might have been exposed for replacement does and all my bucklings go for butcher.

I will try to get some pictures tomorrow.
 

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It's congestion or perhaps it has turned the corner to mastitis from the kid never nursing that side.

Massage with peppermint oil if you have it and very very warm compresses (you can put washclothes in very hot water in a small cooler to carry out with you.) Plan to spend 30+ minutes massage, hot compressing, and milking so tie her well and get comfortable.

If you get to the point in milking where the milk returns to normal consistency then tape the favored teat and leave this one open and observe to see if the buckling will switch sides. Once he learns there are two sides - all is well! Otherwise, plan to milk her partway out once a day to keep mastitis at bay while still signaling her body to slow down production.
 

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Ok. I am curious in my questions here NOT judging at all! So please dont take me for tryin be mean here.

You said you don’t test ffor cl but think you most likely have it there... then you won’t sell for replacement does if you think they have been exposed.

So. You dont sell any doelings? Or does? Cause my understanding of cl is that if it hits anything it is contagious and it lasts in the area a long time. Even if you quarantined the possible suspect... a cl germ could have hit your boot, clothes, skin, the wind was blowin that day.. anything and then you go out to your other goats. And they are exposed. So how does one not expose if you have it there?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ok. I am curious in my questions here NOT judging at all! So please dont take me for tryin be mean here.

You said you don't test ffor cl but think you most likely have it there... then you won't sell for replacement does if you think they have been exposed.

So. You dont sell any doelings? Or does? Cause my understanding of cl is that if it hits anything it is contagious and it lasts in the area a long time. Even if you quarantined the possible suspect... a cl germ could have hit your boot, clothes, skin, the wind was blowin that day.. anything and then you go out to your other goats. And they are exposed. So how does one not expose if you have it there?
If I plan to sell any for replacements, I will automatically pull for bottle babies and they will be raised in the house/garage. And I raise mainly commercial so it is very, very rare that I sell for replacements other than for myself.
 

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How long has the milk been sitting in the udder? If the kid isn't emptying that side, she is going to dry up. When the doe starts drying up, the water parts of the milk is the first to be absorbed, the milk particles are the last. When you milk out an udder that has partially dried, you get a thick creamy almost paste like substance. Can you take a clean catch sample to a vet and have it cultured? That way you would be certain that it is mastitis or not.
 
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