The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This will be my first kidding season and I need to know what all I need. What size/brand tattooing supplies for Nubians? What kind of disbudding device? Do I need and meds for delivery or soon after? What about an "emergency" kit?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,939 Posts
Personally, I would be more concerned with getting the kids on the ground alive as opposed to what to use for tatooing and disbudding, but that could just be me. :laugh: Supplies to help make sure the kids arrive healthy and alive include heat lamps, lots of old towels - never reuse on another kid, 50% Dextrose, weak kid syringes, either frozen colostrum or packaged dehydrated colostrum powder, a good milk replacer and the knowledge of how to feed it, head snare, lamp puller, injectable fortified vitamin B, selenium(if you are in a deficient area), unwaxed dental floss (for tying off bleeding naval cords), some kind of lubricant (I like J Lube - never use mineral oil), betadine scrub/wash or shoulder length ob gloves, Nutridrench could come in handy, blow dryer to help warm kids up, Vet's number in your contacts list, your cell phone always in your pocket, and an adjustable halter for Mom. That's all I can think of right now. Happy kidding, and I hope everything goes well for you. :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,939 Posts
How about for the doe after delivery? Recommended wormer, vaccinations, supplements?
My goats are in dry lot 365, so I don't have a worm problem. I don't vaccinate for anything, and the only supplements my does get are a bucket of warm molasses water assuming I don't have another doe kidding right behind her. Now, having said that, if a doe starts losing condition due to raising triplets I will separate her and start her on grain - either alfalfa pellets or a 14 - 16% pelleted feed depending on how heavy she milks. I usually start her off at about 1/4 to 1/2 pound and increase every 2 to 3 days until she is up to a pound or so per day. At that point I just watch and adjust as necessary.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,939 Posts
Can you explain what to do with all that different stuff you listed?
I'm thinking you are asking about the 50% Dextrose, selenium, vitamin B, head snare and lamb puller? The 50% Dextrose is a simple sugar that is easily absorbed/digested and provides "brain food" to a cold kid that has lost the suck instinct. Mix 30 cc's of Dextrose with 30 cc's very warm water and tube using the weak kid syringe. A weak kid syringe is a 60 cc syringe with a detachable feeding tube that can be purchased at www.Jefferspetsupply.com, or www.caprinesupply.com. I'm sure there are other places, as well, but those are the ones I know carry them. To tube a kid you simply lay the tube alongside the kid until the tube reaches the backside of his rib cage and mark it with your thumb and forefinger. Keeping your forefinger and thumb in place on the feeding tube, insert the feeding tube in the corner of his mouth and gently feed it down his throat. When your forefinger and thumb meet his mouth, you know the tube is in his stomach and not his lungs, and depress the plunger on the syringe. If you can't get your forefinger and thumb to meet his mouth, you have the tube in his lungs. Pull it out and try again.

Selenium deficiency causes white muscle disease and can kill kids, it is marketed under the name of Bo-Se. I do not live in a selenium deficient area, so I don't know what the dosage is. Google it to find out. Vitamin B is simply a means of stimulating appetite and providing a little extra boost without having to worry about overdosing. Vitamin B is water soluble and any extra will be excreted through urine.

A head snare (available at www.Enasco.com) is a means to align a kids head into the proper presentation of head resting on front legs and keeping it there. It fits over the head, behind the ears and in the mouth. Once in place, you slide a 'keeper' of sorts to keep it place, then you can use the handle to pull the kid. Lamb pullers (also available at www.enasco.com) are a length of rubber tubing (for lack of a better word) that have a loop on either end that fit over the kids legs above the fetlock joint. You put them on, tighten the loop so they are snug, and pull gently while the doe is pushing to pull the kid out of the doe. The lamb pullers and the head snare work hand in hand to help pull a kid. A head snare is also very useful when a kid has both front legs turned back and you can't get them straightened out for one reason or another.

If I didn't cover something, please let me know and I will explain. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
Personally, I would be more concerned with getting the kids on the ground alive as opposed to what to use for tatooing and disbudding, but that could just be me. :laugh: Supplies to help make sure the kids arrive healthy and alive include heat lamps, lots of old towels - never reuse on another kid, 50% Dextrose, weak kid syringes, either frozen colostrum or packaged dehydrated colostrum powder, a good milk replacer and the knowledge of how to feed it, head snare, lamp puller, injectable fortified vitamin B, selenium(if you are in a deficient area), unwaxed dental floss (for tying off bleeding naval cords), some kind of lubricant (I like J Lube - never use mineral oil), betadine scrub/wash or shoulder length ob gloves, Nutridrench could come in handy, blow dryer to help warm kids up, Vet's number in your contacts list, your cell phone always in your pocket, and an adjustable halter for Mom. That's all I can think of right now. Happy kidding, and I hope everything goes well for you. :)
What is Nutridrench? And what is it used for? How do I know if I am in a selenium deficient area?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,939 Posts
Nutridrench is a liquid supplement that is full of vitamins and other good things. It comes in a pump type bottle, and can either be given full strength to a kid - a pump or two in the mouth - or mixed in milk or the Dextrose solution. As for knowing if you live in a selenium deficient area, check out this link.

http://tin.er.usgs.gov/geochem/doc/averages/se/usa.html
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top