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TKC Farms
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been told that a calf bolus known as sustain iii can be used and is now used for Coccidia treatment. You take a sustain iii calf bolus and cut it in quarters. Give one quarter of a tablet and that it is time released so you don’t do the 5 days as with Corrid. I wish (hoping) that will be the case. Please let me here your pros and cons. My Corrid liquid I used last time, it must have been too weak of a mixing on my part. He fail the fecal exam again 10 days after completion of 5 days. I am using the powder this round. I would like to use sustain iii.
 
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We will be using Sustain III this year once our toltrazuril runs out. It’s a sulfa med just like Albon, DiMethox, etc but a different form.
 

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TKC Farms
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I will have to look into this...I'd never heard it. I like once and done not multiple days in a row, treatments.
From what I understand so far is that maybe you take a tablet that is for a 200 pound calf and if you have a 100 pound goat you cut in half. 50 pound goat gets one quarter of tablet. I really don't know if you should give any goat that is under 50 pounds? You would give it today and wait three full days and on the fourth day one more dose and that is it?
It is time release over 3 days. Let me know your findings please.
 
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TKC Farms
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am still confused over the medicated feed for Coccidia. Some swear by it others don’t. If you are feeding this after all goats are Coccidia free, then you have newborns that start eating it as they grow, does it mean they will never get Coccidia?
 

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I think the medicated feed would help keep levels down in the kids so that when they are weaned, and still exposed to cocci in the soil, that they wouldn’t succumb to an overload and create a lot of digestive problems.
Just keeping cocci out of their bodies doesn’t mean that they will not pick them up from the environment again/continuously. My understanding is that that stuff is always around, even if you keep a really clean place. There is no way to get rid of it in the soil, pastures, etc. once you’ve had goats who shed it. You can only keep it under control so as not to negatively impact the kids at their most susceptible age.

I read that there are different drugs to treat coccidia, but some are ok for for lactating does, and some are not. I think that is why I have steered away from medicated feed, which usually has Rumensin (monensin) in it, which is not safe for lactating does.
 

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I think the medicated feed would help keep levels down in the kids so that when they are weaned, and still exposed to cocci in the soil, that they wouldn't succumb to an overload and create a lot of digestive problems.
Just keeping cocci out of their bodies doesn't mean that they will not pick them up from the environment again/continuously. My understanding is that that stuff is always around, even if you keep a really clean place. There is no way to get rid of it in the soil, pastures, etc. once you've had goats who shed it. You can only keep it under control so as not to negatively impact the kids at their most susceptible age.

I read that there are different drugs to treat coccidia, but some are ok for for lactating does, and some are not. I think that is why I have steered away from medicated feed, which usually has Rumensin (monensin) in it, which is not safe for lactating does.
Thanks, this helps a lot. Then when I have a new batch of kids next year, I could feed medicated feed to them in their creep feeder where moms can't get, correct?
 

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Even being fed medicated feed doesn't mean they will never have a cocci explosion.

Stress alone can trigger cocci to go to a high enough level, to be at an unsafe level, causing issues.

Remember, all goats have a low and safe level of cocci.
However, it is when it raises to a certain level, it can be deadly.

This is with kids and adults alike.

It use to be dark/black scours, now that is not the case anymore.
We do not always see scouring signs anymore. But sometimes we do.
 

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I read that there are different drugs to treat coccidia, but some are ok for for lactating does, and some are not. I think that is why I have steered away from medicated feed, which usually has Rumensin (monensin) in it, which is not safe for lactating does.
I want to point out, for anyone new reading this that is not familiar with rumensin, that it is not to be fed to lactating does whose milk is being used for *human* consumption. It's been approved in cows but not yet goats.

You can most definitely feed medicated grain to does who are lactating and just nursing their kids.
 

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No problem! I’ve seen a lot of questions about it in the past. I wanted to make sure anyone reading it wasn’t going to get worried when reading their grain bag. I saw the same warning years again and was like, “wait, what?” lol.
 

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No problem! I've seen a lot of questions about it in the past. I wanted to make sure anyone reading it wasn't going to get worried when reading their grain bag. I saw the same warning years again and was like, "wait, what?" lol.
Yeah, me too! That's why I've avoided monensin and used amprolium/CoRid in my mixed herd.

I wish they had clarified why it was not "safe" instead of making me have a little panic.
 

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I am still confused over the medicated feed for Coccidia. Some swear by it others don't. If you are feeding this after all goats are Coccidia free, then you have newborns that start eating it as they grow, does it mean they will never get Coccidia?
We have used the medicated feed from the day we got our goats. All our kids have only eaten this feed. So far, no coccidia issues but to say they will never have it......I just don't know. We also keep Corrid in our main water source. When it rains, we have several places where we have seen all our animals drink from but mostly, they like the main clean water source.
 

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Even being fed medicated feed doesn't mean they will never have a cocci explosion.

Stress alone can trigger cocci to go to a high enough level, to be at an unsafe level, causing issues.

Remember, all goats have a low and safe level of cocci.
However, it is when it raises to a certain level, it can be deadly.

This is with kids and adults alike.

It use to be dark/black scours, now that is not the case anymore.
We do not always see scouring signs anymore. But sometimes we do.
So does this mean coccidia doesn't have to be introduced from an outside source? Is this something they carry and stress can cause a problem?
 

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Kids aren’t born with coccidia but most all goats carry it naturally even in minuscule amounts. Any worms or coccidia kids contract are from the environment or other goats around them.

Stress causes a problem with both worms and coccidia. That’s why many will make sure to treat for coccidia preventatively when weaning, since that’s one of the most stressful times of their life.
 

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I am still confused over the medicated feed for Coccidia. Some swear by it others don't. If you are feeding this after all goats are Coccidia free, then you have newborns that start eating it as they grow, does it mean they will never get Coccidia?
I milk my goats. So i do a coccidia treatment to each kid. I do not want that or any meds in my milk. If i need treat an adult that i am milking (never have) i would dump all milk until the withdrawl time was over.
 

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So does this mean coccidia doesn't have to be introduced from an outside source? Is this something they carry and stress can cause a problem?
Yes, that is correct sadly.

It was explained very well above too.
 

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TKC Farms
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Kids aren't born with coccidia but most all goats carry it naturally even in minuscule amounts. Any worms or coccidia kids contract are from the environment or other goats around them.

Stress causes a problem with both worms and coccidia. That's why many will make sure to treat for coccidia preventatively when weaning, since that's one of the most stressful times of their life.
When you say treat for coccidia , you mean the moms during the weaning or babies or both?
 
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