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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello I am currently getting ready to put up a new fence and I have the sheep and goat fencing. I am wondering how far apart I should put the t post? I will be using 5ft t post and most people say 8 to 12ft apart. I was thinking of doing 10ft apart.
Thank you
 

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I assume your running electric fence? I started out pretty close together myself about 12-15ft. But I learned as long as I keep decent tension and use the 7 or 8ft posts I can easily space em about 30ft without sagging.

The hard part is turning corners or irregularities in ground height.

My best cheapest solution so far is metal posts at corners and maybe every 50-100 ft on long straight stretches, and then plastic step in posts every 10 to 15ft in between the metal t-posts to allow the lines to go in the dips or over the bumps.
 

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6' T post with 4' spacing: the 4x4" wire is difficult to get a tight stretch between the post without bending and/or breaking the the square sections. The way goats stand on, poke their heads through, push against and rub on the fencing creates sections that will bow and sag more than could possibly be imagined until it is experienced. Some people run a strand(s) of electric wire on the inside to keep the goats off of the fencing due to some of these reasons.
 

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6' T post with 4' spacing: the 4x4" wire is difficult to get a tight stretch between the post without bending and/or breaking the the square sections. The way goats stand on, push against and rub on the fencing creates sections that will bow and sag more than could possibly be imagined until it is experienced. Some people run a strand(s) of electric wire on the inside to keep the goats off of the fencing due to some of these reasons.
Ugh I know I don't get much time out of the wire on the areas where they scratch and rub a lot. You need to replace it, keep goats locked inside for about an hour at a time and do it section by section so it doesn't take too long.
 

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Are you saying cut and remove sections out of the fencing and piece it back together again with a new fencing? Are you using wooden post or T post? Would adding a post in between the how ever many feet spacing (6'-8'?) be an option? How many total feet of fencing are you replacing?
 

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Are you saying cut and remove sections out of the fencing and piece it back together again with a new fencing? Are you using wooden post or T post? Would adding a post in between the how ever many feet spacing (6'-8'?) be an option? How many total feet of fencing are you replacing?
T-posts, metal. The way we do it is each side of the enclosure (it's like rectangular-ish), we roll the wire and then stop at the corners, secure it, and start a new roll on the next side. It's not one big roll that's all connected. So I go to one end, untie it from the t-posts (we use wire to secure the wire lol), wrap it up until the end of that single piece, then put the new piece on after that from the spot we took it off of. Pretty simple. I would say it is anywhere from 15-30 foot sections. That's a rough estimate lol.

And yes, in certain areas where they rub more I put in as many t posts as necessary in between the sections.

Ground staples help as well to prevent the curving.
 

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Oh, I understand now what you were saying. Guess that would work for a small lot. A bit impractical when fencing several hundreds of feet for an area though.
 

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Oh, I understand now what you were saying. Guess that would work for a small lot. A bit impractical when fencing several hundreds of feet for an area though.
Yes, welded wire does not hold up as well as it should. It's not as practical for large areas. I like it, though.
 

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I am not saying welded wire is impractical for fencing large areas in the least. I am saying taking out and replacing sections of wire is impractical when using it for a large area.
 

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Ugh I know I don't get much time out of the wire on the areas where they scratch and rub a lot. You need to replace it, keep goats locked inside for about an hour at a time and do it section by section so it doesn't take too long.
Try adding more posts like @NigerianNewbie does... it DOES help a ton. We space five ft on welded wire and it works ok in most spots but there are favorite spots that was just add in an extra post when we see it bowing. That keeps the wire from breaking and i cannot imagine tryin keep your wire tight like you are doing it.
 

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Try adding more posts like @NigerianNewbie does... it DOES help a ton. We space five ft on welded wire and it works ok in most spots but there are favorite spots that was just add in an extra post when we see it bowing. That keeps the wire from breaking and i cannot imagine tryin keep your wire tight like you are doing it.
I do. Posts in between weaker areas of course.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I am doing the 6 ft post and also 4x4 pressure treated wood in spots to help I'm fencing about 275ft. I am also using a fence stretcher to make it tight.
 

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Doesn't anybody use tensioner wire? It makes a huge difference in how tight and sturdy your fencing is.
Tensioner wire added where? Top and bottom, or just goat scratching hight. Not thought of that.
 

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Tensioner wire added where? Top and bottom, or just goat scratching hight. Not thought of that.
If I can afford it at the time in do top bottom and middle. If not I do middle when building and add top and bottom asap.

I'm going to bring building and new set of pens in the near future. I'll try to put a tutorial up for everyone to see.
 
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