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I got a 9 week old dam raised dwarf doe to add to our herd. She is very skittish. She will eat out of my hand but that is it. I have had her for 10 days and has made very little or no progress at all. I couldn't get her in the barn the last 2 nights and had to leave her out.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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You're going to have to catch her up and put a leash on her and just take her everywhere you go around the property. Give her treats periodically and give her a lot of attention. Of you have kids, have them do this as well. In a few weeks you Should see her start wanting your attention. Hope this helps.
 

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Spend time with her in a small area. Talk to her every time you go out there, bring treats! The more interaction you have with her the better. I am not adverse to grabbing a kid by the leg and making them sit in my lap to be petted for awhile either!
 

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yes, I read somewhere that if you grab them and just hug them for a long while, it makes them desensitized. we got some skittish babies last year, and i did that one day to one of them. she turned out to be much friendlier than the other one.

treats work too. just give them time, and don't do anything scary around them for a while (e.g. yelling, clapping loudly, etc)
 

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I agree, you need to have a lot of time with her. My oldest daughter got a new goat in early May, she was about 10 weeks old and wild as can be.
We brought her home, and turned her out with a doe who is a month older than her, and a bottle baby.
We'd have to lead the older doeling into the barn so the 'wild' one would follow just so we could catch her.

Routine is a big part of taming IMO. You have to do things in a routinely manor, and be consistent.

Lots of talking, love, and patience. We always put the wild ones on a halter/lead to work with them. Rub them all over their body with our hand and eventually start using a brush.

Within 3 weeks this doe was tame enough we could walk up to her and catch her.

We've had her 6 weeks now, and she's become a spoiled baby lol
If she wants her grain, we'll hear about it! If we call her name she will usually reply! And if she sees us she will yell for us and run over to the gate. She loves being rubbed/loved on. She absolutely LOVES to be brushed.
 

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My ND doeling was like that. She would take a few nibbles of stuff off my hand but as soon as I got near her she would take off! Just take time to be with her and she will come around. I spent a lot of time offering her food and sitting with her on the pasture. She's now as tame as my older doe and loves getting attention. :)
 

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My experience with taming almost ANY animal is to confine them to a smaller area so they can't run and hide from you. Spend lots of time with them and use lots of treats. Make them let you pet them while they eat, etc. And dont ALWAYS go right up to her when you enter her area. Just go in and sit. Let her come to you (for treats). Even if she doesn't come to you... that's ok. Just sit awhile and then leave. It helps her not see you as any kind of threat.

My kids are dam raised, but man... they all come RUNNIN the second they hear that gate. If I crouch down, I have six babies fighting for lap space. If I'm standing, there's usually at least 3 trying to convince me to crouch! LOL
 

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I usually wait until kidding time and make sure that I am there when they kid. I let them "clean" me up when they clean their newborns and we are family after that. I am fine with my goats not being extremely friendly. I can always catch them if I need to.
 

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My experience with my little doe that was wild as a deer has been that it is important to be patient and make all of your interactions with the goat positive. Never chase them down if you can at all help it. Putting them on a lead/holding them until they settle did not work for me, it just made her more scared and likely to runaway. Once I figured out a way to feed her without having to catch her she came around. I would also wait patiently (so painfully patiently) until she joined the others inside to close the barn instead of catching her to put her up.
 
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