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Might be getting an Alpine bottle baby in the next couple of weeks. I’m used to having Nigerians. Other than the breed standards, what should I know about them? Anything major that is different as far as care, behavior, management?
 
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Okay sounds like they’re mean ones. I have a very stubborn herd queen that I think will keep her in check when she gets older, but good to know. I’m excited but it will definitely be a learning experience having full sized goats. The main thing I’m looking forward to is not having 30 other goats in a class to compete against like you do with Nigerians.
 

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I absolutely love Alpines. It’s true they can be bullies but not really worse than some of the ND I’ve seen a lot. They have very strong personalities and are very easy to teach things to. Most Alpines are very affectionate. They are incredible mothers, great milkers, and easy to handle.

They can be jumpers and escape artists but if you have Nigies you already know about hard to keep in goats!
 

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Hope no-one minds me jumping in here! I've been following this thread.
I've got the opportunity to buy an Alpine doe. If I got her, I'd be breeding her to my Nubian buck. I'm looking for good dairy goats who are fairly low maintenance, are good moms, and good foragers, as I also do rotational grazing throughout the property to control brush. I love the Nubians, but they seem to be quite delicate. The Alpines I've seen seem tougher.
What are the potential drawbacks here?
 

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The biggest is bullying. The other would be selling kids that are mixed if people in your area prefer pure breeds.
Thanks! Yes, I have wondered about selling mixed kids. Not sure how that would go. It's something I'd just have to try and see.
I will be observing the herd before buying, so I'm hoping to pick a doe that is more laid back and hopefully won't become a bully.
 

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My thought is: there will probably always be a market for good, solid dairy goats. If I'm able to breed the kind of goat I want, probably there are other people out there who will be interested in the same thing.
None of my goats are registered, anyway, and I have no plans to get into showing, so to me, the dairy quality and general hardiness are the most important.
 

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Might be getting an Alpine bottle baby in the next couple of weeks. I'm used to having Nigerians. Other than the breed standards, what should I know about them? Anything major that is different as far as care, behavior, management?
Alpine goats tend to be hardy and adjust well to various types of climate. They are naturally more curious than usual, and will at times get fixated by watching their surroundings. They are independent and strong willed. Full of themselves without a doubt. They tend to want to be herd leaders and possibly this is where they get the reputation of being bullies. My advice would be to establish yourself as herd leader from the beginning, it helps even out that strong will they are born with. Mine decided to test his dominance round about 2 years of age; that didn't last long and seemed to settle the goober down a little. I picked an Alpine to take the position of herd leader and he has been wonderful in this role. Very protective in nature, coming front and center when threatened and will keep the others in line if need be. Never would I label him as being mean. He is sweet, kind to the others, affectionate with humans, shares hay and shelter space nicely. Now, if the herd dynamics were to be changed and his lead role was threatened, I sense he would possibly be brutal in defend his standing.
 

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Alpine goats tend to be hardy and adjust well to various types of climate. They are naturally more curious than usual, and will at times get fixated by watching their surroundings. They are independent and strong willed. Full of themselves without a doubt. They tend to want to be herd leaders and possibly this is where they get the reputation of being bullies. My advice would be to establish yourself as herd leader from the beginning, it helps even out that strong will they are born with. Mine decided to test his dominance round about 2 years of age; that didn't last long and seemed to settle the goober down a little. I picked an Alpine to take the position of herd leader and he has been wonderful in this role. Very protective in nature, coming front and center when threatened and will keep the others in line if need be. Never would I label him as being mean. He is sweet, kind to the others, affectionate with humans, shares hay and shelter space nicely. Now, if the herd dynamics were to be changed and his lead role was threatened, I sense he would possibly be brutal in defend his standing.
That is helpful! Thanks!
 
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