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I keep hearing folks talk about how their goats got out and did X, Y, or Z. Obviously, something has to be done to keep them in, or out. What did you do to keep them out of trouble? The crazier the solution, the better.

In my case, it was the goats getting into the chicken coop and eating the straw out of the nest boxes. Little punks. So I started thinking. I wanted them to exit into the pasture preferably, so that the larger birds would tend to stay in there. We have turkeys and guineas, birds whose size meant one of those nifty little chicken doors would have to be large enough that a full grown buck could get in if so inclined. I thought about it, and the only solution seemed to be a half door.

And it worked. The goats look, well, incredibly stupid if they stick their heads in the gap underneath the partial door that allows the chickens to easily get in and out. This partial door is in addition to their full size door that I shut at night. I built the partial door myself. It is really solid, which means some day some dopey goat will have to choose to take it on.

I know mine isn't completely a "pull out the duct tape, jumper cables, and bailing twine" kind of crazy fix, but what are some of the fixes you have had to make that reflect the ingenious troublemakers in our midst?
 

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Actually, mine are almost laughably agreeable most of the time. I found out by accident. I was having trouble with a few naughty ones who liked to jump the fence and eat the weeds on the side of the driveway. Finally one day I lost my temper and picked up a handful of gravel and threw it at them. They were like...WHOA!!!....what's with her?!?!.....wwaaaahhhhhh!!! After laughing at their surprise at my loss of sanity, I ended up chasing them down the driveway and locked them up away from their friends in a dry lot. About half hour later I allowed them out in the pasture with their buddies again. I watched them and as soon as they came near that section of the fence I went outside. Now, they can easily leap the fence and sure enough, they did it again. Out came the gravel and the chasing and the time out. Returned them to the pasture and watched again. They came to the fence and I went out and threw gravel until they backed away. I have never had that problem again. Now, if they are too close, I just go out and scold them and toss a small handful, they usually move off a few yards and look like... "This oK?" ....problem is, there is a lot of fence and the browse is getting thinner....the lesson has not generalized to all fences...(DRAT!) ... They only stay because there is plenty of browse on the inside and they are not hungry....sigh...
 

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Well, I don't have any crazy solutions to goats getting out, but there were two very amazing things I witnessed with my guys. My pens are adapted from old feed lot pens. The pens are built with railroad ties that have 3 2X12 boards on the outside of the ties and 2 staggered 2X12 boards on the inside of the ties. The outside boards are a good foot or so above the ground and the kids figured out they could jump up on top of the top inside board, balance for a moment, then go between the inside and outside boards and get out. Of course, getting back in was a bit of a challenge and they never quite figured that one out. :laugh: I solved the problem by putting pallets in between the outer and inner boards. The other was when the new continuous fences were built. The pipe bars were not welded in between the usual bars of the gate quite high enough, and the kids would literally line up and jump out between the space. It was like watching the cartoons of counting sheep, except it was with goats. It was really quite amazing watching them line up and jump back and forth through the space in the gate! Well, to everyone but Dad. :laugh: I tried to tell him we needed another bar in the gate, but you have to prove everything to him. I guess the kids got the point across. :lol: Another bar was welded in and that solved the problem.
 

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My Jasper is a old goat now yet he tries to escape to what he thinks are greener pastures all day long. At night I keep him in a 20x20 small barn. In the morning I'll look out and he is in the yard..... Just him no other goats, they don't follow him cause I think they feel they will get in trouble. Not jasper he's jumped through barn windows, kicked at barn doors all night until the latch has opened.( I've had to put bars on the windows,the windows are at my eye level too)
I can see him watching me do work around the pen,he tries to help but I think he is just looking for a week spot in the fence and gate. It's totally normal around here for someone to say " you have a goat loose" keeps me buisy
 
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