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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know… "don't tether them" is the standard advice, but if I'm going to sit out with the goats while they landscape, I want them tethered so I can read, lie in a hammock, etc. and not worry about one person (ME!) chasing three goats in three directions.

I'm wondering how some of you have tied out your goats. I want to allow them some range, so thought I would put a collar on the goat and tie it to a long cable, like a dog run. That way, it can move up and down the cable freely, browse the edge of the yard/house and still be in sight.

So, if you tie your goat out, what material do you use?

Thanks
 

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Maybe a ground stake and dog cable? Make sure they can't get caught anything and they should be fine. Goats aren't very smart when it comes to being tied up... They tend to get wrapped around themselves more than anything.
 

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I tether my goats out all the time. I just use a fence post and a long (12 ft) leash and put them where they won't get tangled up, I check on them throughout the day and the worst tangle is the rope wrapped around a hind leg a few times. I don't tether them till they are about 1 1/2 months old, until then they are either in the mini pasture or running free. When they run free, they usually stay by their moms.
 

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I use a big heavy used tire, a coated cable from the pet store (the ones for extra large dogs), and i watch them. I put a water bucket in the center of the tire.

I use the tires because they have some give if the goat runs and hits the end of the cable, plus I can just tip them up and roll them where ever i want them. I use the heavy duty cable because they are strong and very stiff and can't get wrapped tight around a leg, and I watch them in case someone else's dog wander past and decides to attack. I put the bucket in the center of the tire because then they always have water that they can't dump over. Just make sure the tires are big enough to be heavy enough the goats can't drag them all over. :)
 

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we tether ours out all the time. no fence around the property. we use 12-15ft long chain (the lightweight ones....not heavy chains) and a dog collar. we used to use a metal rebar rod to stake them out, but they've figured out how to wiggle their way out of that, so i just tie them to a tree or a sturdy root with a carabiner. i check them every once in a while, and unwrap them from the one small or large thing they somehow got around, under and through.
 

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I have tethered out horses before and I used a cable that I had run through a garden hose, putting the snap on after it was through. The cable would not wrap small enough with the hose on it to cause any harm, but was flexible enough to let the horse eat anywhere in the tether area. Worked pretty well. I would think that the raised run line would work well if it was adjusted well. I love the idea if a tire with a bucket of water in the center. That's brilliant!
 

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We also use a small tractor tire in the pasture. Easy to move. That way they can all eat the greenery.
 

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I use a T post and braid cable with the rubber coating. It has clips on each end. It is fairly stiff. I tether out bucks during the day and check on them. I have old protein tubs that I use for water for them.If I had any trees I would make a skyline and use that. I think that would be ideal.
 

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I think a stake and a long coil of rope should do. If you are going to watch them they should do perfectly fine :) But if you plan on possibly leaving them on their own for a bit, I would suggest you tether them so that they cannot overlap ropes, this helps prevent them getting tangled and choking. You can also use regular halters(not the rope ones, when they pull on rope ones they will tighten and they will not be able to eat) that way there isn't anything on their neck in the first place that can choke them.
 

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I know… "don't tether them" is the standard advice, but if I'm going to sit out with the goats while they landscape, I want them tethered so I can read, lie in a hammock, etc. and not worry about one person (ME!) chasing three goats in three directions.

Thanks
That sounds so peaceful...sitting outside with them...reading a book lying in a hammock... Good Luck. I have never been able to sit and read without my goats nibbling on my book, chewing my shoes laces, zipping up/down my pocket zippers trying to find food... ;)

If you are around, I don't see why you can't teter them. Just make sure you are out of their way but do watch them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks to everyone for the input. I like the idea of rolling a tire. Even my kids could handle that! A lightweight chain instead of a cable sounds like a winner, too. There would be less chance of the kinking and it would be more durable.
I'll also be sure to watch where I put my book ! LoL
 

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I've hooked them out before. I used a rebar post with a "T" welded to the top. For the tether I used a lunge line attached to a brass ring. The brass ring was placed on the ground and the rebar stake was driven thru the middle. The goat could go around in a circle and there was noting for them to get tangled in. I rope or something similar could replace the lunge line. Each goat wears a collar all the time, so I just hooked the collor to the lung line snap.
 

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I tether my goats out all the time. In fact that's how my buck is living right now. I use a large tractor tire with a hole drilled in it to put the cable through or just a fence post. For the lines I use a plastic coated metal dog cable with a spring loaded clip next to their collar so that if they take off running it softens the blow to their neck when they hit the end of the line. It looks kind of like this.


Chains and rope didn't work good for me they always tangled up and kinked. These cables don't at all. One of mine is three years old and been used nearly every day all day and its still in complete working order.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
That's just the thing I was thinking of. We had one for a dog for a while, years ago.
 

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I tether my goats out all the time. In fact that's how my buck is living right now. I use a large tractor tire with a hole drilled in it to put the cable through or just a fence post. For the lines I use a plastic coated metal dog cable with a spring loaded clip next to their collar so that if they take off running it softens the blow to their neck when they hit the end of the line. It looks kind of like this.


Chains and rope didn't work good for me they always tangled up and kinked. These cables don't at all. One of mine is three years old and been used nearly every day all day and its still in complete working order.
This is what i use, exact same thing, the thick one for really big dogs. I personally do not use a chain of any kind, ever. A chain isn't stiff enough to resist wrapping around a leg where as the heavy cable is too stiff for that to happen. I was using a light chain many years ago, ran inside for a quick potty trip and when i came back out my Pygmy had the chain so tight around her back leg I had to cut the links with bolt cutter to get her loose because it was just so tightly jammed.
 

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Goatless goat momma
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I tether my goats out all the time. In fact that's how my buck is living right now. I use a large tractor tire with a hole drilled in it to put the cable through or just a fence post. For the lines I use a plastic coated metal dog cable with a spring loaded clip next to their collar so that if they take off running it softens the blow to their neck when they hit the end of the line. It looks kind of like this.

Chains and rope didn't work good for me they always tangled up and kinked. These cables don't at all. One of mine is three years old and been used nearly every day all day and its still in complete working order.
I'm going to switch from chains to this cable. i find with the chains, they kink, and the welded part can come apart. also, unless your goats are really trained on the lead, when they pull/jerk the chain to get to that piece of grass they want to eat, it's not great on your hands (speaking from experience...currently have a blood bruise on my thumb and the chunk taken out of my index knuckle has finally healed).

xymenah, how long is the cable that you use?
 

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Seat Belt

Hello,
Has anyone used a seatbelt? ("webbing" as they call it).
Someone mentioned a "leash". What material would that be?
I'm looking for a cheap material which a goat cannot bite through, to make fences. Does anyone know if a goat can bite through a seatbelt?
 

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With determination, they can bite through a lot! Mine managed to break chain link fencing. The buck chewed a hole in it!
 

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My goats don't ever run away lol they seriously just browse all day and are only penned at night. However I do tether my buck sometimes because he is a huge pita like trouble making pita lol but yeah anytime I try to read the just try to eat my book. If my buck is loose he will jump on me lol
 
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