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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have been discussing weights and measurements, and noted a few goats that measure 41" and more at the withers,

I am curious now on the tallest goats you have seen or know of?

I think that could be more important for a pack goat then mature weight.

I have never seen a 300lb goat in the flesh but have seen photos that I believe. These goats were both long and tall and the weight distributed well, all are bucks, not wethers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, I'm used to feeding horses and cattle so a goats bill is pretty light in comparison, should be able to feed 4-5 for one horse, pretty good deal to me !

I am not advocating holstein sized wethers, I am wondering how tall the biggest one is that folks have seen. Although I have noticed that bigger draft horses and pack horses do handle bigger loads. Also my oxen I have had.

I suspect a similar correlation will be found once we have some good working pack goat strains, it will be I am sure.
 

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Jake said:
Although I have noticed that bigger draft horses and pack horses do handle bigger loads. Also my oxen I have had.

I suspect a similar correlation will be found once we have some good working pack goat strains, it will be I am sure.
Draft horses are certainly able to handle bigger loads (it's what they're designed for), but I've found that they do not live as long or hold up as well as a smaller horse. Their feet and legs break down quicker because of constantly carting around the added weight of their body. I wonder if extra-big goats could have the same problem? And like any animal, attitude counts for probably 80 - 90% of ability. This is one reason the Morgan horse became so wildly popular in the 1800's. It was a horse whose tough little body and incredible work ethic made it the best all-around work horse in America despite its diminutive size. The dainty little Arabian horse is famous worldwide for its incredible endurance even while carrying a full load. And both of those smaller breeds are famous for their long working lives, unlike the heavier draft breeds. Bigger is not necessarily better.
 

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Our 250 plus pound goats that are at least 38 to 40 inches don't seem to break down any faster than a smaller goat. I do know that theoreticallly a larger animal will not live as long as a smaller one but I don't see that that applies to our goats and we probably have the comnsistently biggest genetics out there.
This mostly applies to giant breed animal such as great danes but I don't see it in goats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Drafters can live as long as other horses, I know of mares that have raised foals in their late teens, and I have been around draft horses much of my life. Working teams in their teens are very common. Everytime I think one breed is longer lived then another I hear of another in their 20s of another breed.

Genetics and early life and management are what gets them healthy into later years.

My interest is in the development of a breeding strain of packgoats that will carry a bigger load because they are physically able.

We are drifting off topic, I was simply interested in what were the tallest goats that folks have known?? I know the biggest drafters I have seen.
 

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I have an Icelandic mare doing great that is 32 years old and 2 mares in great shape that are 28 years old. Well one is either 39 or 28 years old, I don't doubt that she is 39! Her papers from Iceland say she was born in 1972 her US papers say 1983. Iceland didn't allow horses over a certain age to be exported and she was wanted by a buyer so I don't doubt some birth date fudging went on!

The mare who's age is in question had foals in 2005 and 2006. The 2005 foal was a miracle as she contracted Potomac Horse fever the summer of 2004 while pregnant and nearly died. She didn't willingly eat for over 6 weeks... and much to my and my vet's surprise didn't lose the foal!

Tough breed!
 

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I think 41" is as tall as I have personally seen. We have had numerous goats in the 38"-39" range and the odd goat that is slightly taller. The biggest thing that taller goats do for me is that they have longer legs which translates into a little faster pace on the trail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi Rex

Welcome back,

I am hoping to be seeing a number in the years to come as more and more folks get to thinking about breeding taller and longer pack goats,

I am going to be seeing some goats this fall that really push the scales down and taking my tape to get some measurements if I can.

The Alpine/Saanen seems to be the cross of choice, and I'd sure like to see some selective breeding for a longer taller pack goat that can get out on the trails and carry some loads.
 

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Saw one that a guy in Redding, Ca. had that was 41 inches and I swear I had never seen a goat so big! With the big horns and coloring and all it looked like a mix between an Ibex and a goat! I couldn't believe it!
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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If you want to see truly large bucks, take a visit to a larger ADGA goat show that has bucks showing. There isnt to many of them and the last one I partook in was in Deer Park 8 or so years ago. A fully grown intact buck owned by a nationally known breeder can be an impressive site. Thick powerful necks with stances far taller then any wether I have ever seen. But size isnt a factor when breeding dairy goats. Breed and dairy confirmation and milk production are the main traits breed for. Size is often a by product from a good breeding program.

I know that many people like to breed boar with a dairy animal to produce a pack goat and I can understand why. Boars are thicker with a much more substantial bone mass. As they should. They are meat goats after all. While a dairy goat is much more refined in both areas as that is a trait looked for. Its called dairiness or dairy standard. The focus is on a structurally correct skeletal frame rather then size or girth. Like putting a Holstein or a Jersey and an Angus side by side. Except in the bore goat you are getting, on average, a shorter animal then a dairy goat. Although the hybrid vigor is hopefully there to help balance it all out and in the end producing a good sized pack goat.

For me though, I dont care for the often stubborn / bullheadedness that comes with the boar side. Around here, boars are meat goats only with no influence in other areas and as such are considered dumb and lazy by goat standards. As are nubians. But nubians are a suburban favorite as they are so much more passive then the other goat breeds and those ears melt hearts. Personally, I always found the boars fairly observant and more fleet a foot then nubians. Raised a few pure blooded boars with alpines one year and they took on the alpines traits. But being what they are they were pushy and stubborn and would rear up as if to ram when being pushed outta the way or back into a gate. Could of been a trait passed down from their sire who was a mean bastard who would slam any and everyone who were not paying close attention to his moods. He would even fight a 2000 lbs brown swiss bull when the urge arouse. He never won mind you but he never backed down. He loved to do battle with Rams as well. So this is where my opinion comes from and I am sure its tainted because of it.
 

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Have you ever seen some of the Pakistani goat breeds? Sheep, too. Those suckers are ENORMOUS. Not sure how practical they are, but neat to look at, anyway.

[youtube:2jytozqg]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=10Dj1v6F9N8[/youtube:2jytozqg]
 

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They look like massive Nubians on steroids, lol. But they look overdone to me. Overweight, maybe, or bad angulation, or they lack enough bone for their height or something. I'm still a newbie to goat conformation but there is just something off about them to my eye.

Still, quite interesting! I have a Pakistani friend who breeds them. He doesn't breed them for these heavyweight competitions, though, but for milk & meat, so his aren't as big.
 
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